Logo

Blackman Collegiate Academy explores MTSU science options

Blackman Collegiate Academy juniors sampled science at MTSU and the University Honors College during a Friday (March 24) visit to campus.

Geosciences, biology, physics and astronomy, Concrete Industry Management and the university’s Experimental Vehicles Program were areas the Blackman High School students discovered in the school’s second visit to MTSU this year.

MTSU biology chair Lynn Boyd addresses research and career opportunities in her field March 24 in the new Science Building during the Blackman Collegiate Academy Day at MTSU. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

MTSU biology chair Lynn Boyd addresses research and career opportunities in her field March 24 in the Science Building during the Blackman Collegiate Academy Day at MTSU. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

The MTSU-Blackman partnership is one of several arranged each semester during the academic year. It allows freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors opportunities to spend time on the college campus, meeting MTSU students, faculty and administrators and learning about many of the university’s 140-plus programs.

As part of the partnership, which is designed to give them a competitive edge as they prepare for college, juniors and seniors in the academy who meet eligibility standards can take up to six hours of university courses taught by MTSU instructors at Blackman at no cost. The credits will count on high school and college transcripts.

Diamond Bradley, 17, was one of nearly 10 students taking in a 45-minute session on concrete. They even made concrete coasters.

“This has been a good experience,” Bradley said at the conclusion of the session. “I had trouble with mine, but I enjoyed the process. There’s a lot to learn off simple concrete. There’s a lot to the process.”

Classmate Gabrielle Brown, 16, liked the fact “a lot of job opportunities” can be found in the concrete industry.

Blackman High School junior Gabriele Brown makes a concrete coaster during a session led by Concrete Industry Management's Nicole Green as part of the March 24 Blackman Collegiate Academy Day at MTSU.

Blackman High School junior Gabriele Brown makes a concrete coaster during a session led by Concrete Industry Management’s Nicole Green as part of the March 24 Blackman Collegiate Academy Day at MTSU.

Zach Rachidi, 16, was with a group in Wiser-Patten Science Hall witnessing “cool” things happening in physics, led by Department of Physics and Astronomy chair Ron Henderson.

“Actually it was pretty cool and entertaining (demonstrations by Henderson), but it is not something I want to do,” said Rachidi, who expressed a strong interest in being a pilot and following an aerospace path.

Rachidi said he “learned a lot about the Honors College — the GPA requirements and the (Honors) opportunities at MTSU.”

Henderson, concrete’s Heather Brown and Nicole Green, biology chair Lynn Boyd, geosciences chair Warner Cribb and engineering technology chair Walter Boles discussed careers in their respective fields. In addition to Wiser-Patten, sessions were the new Science Building, Davis Science Building, Voorhies Engineering Technology Building

Dean John Vile and event coordinator Susan Lyons provided a complete rundown of Honors College options and requirements as they toured the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building.

Concluding their visit, Blackman students heard about “a typical day in the life of a college student” from MTSU Student Ambassadors in the Student Union Building.

After arriving on campus earlier in the day at the Student Services and Admissions Center/MT One Stop, Blackman students received True Blue Bags and heard about the admissions process from Linda Olsen, director of undergraduate recruitment, and recruiter Joey Clark.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU Department of Physics and Astronomy chair Ron Henderson explains how various heat and water processes will create steam and eventually cause the sides of aluminum can to cave in March 24 to Blackman Collegiate Academy students visiting MTSU.

MTSU Department of Physics and Astronomy chair Ron Henderson explains and then shows Blackman Collegiate Academy students how various heat and water processes create steam and eventually cause the sides of aluminum can to cave in March 24 at MTSU.

 

Noted immigration attorney to give March 15 guest lecture at MTSU

Noted Nashville immigration law specialist Elliott Ozment will speak on the “History of Xenophobia in America” at MTSU.

Ozment’s talk will start at 2:20 p.m. Wednesday, March 15, in the Simmons Amphitheatre (Room 106) of the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building. The talk is open to the public.

Elliott Ozment

Elliott Ozment

All visitors are requested to use parking meters or obtain a permit from the Parking and Transportation Services office at 1403 E. Main St. or purchase and print a visitor pass at https://mtsu.t2hosted.com.

Ozment’s visit is presented by the MTSU Department of Political Science and University Honors College, which often invites guest speakers to share expertise — often about timely topics.

Xenophobia, Ozment’s topic, relates to the fear and hatred of strangers or foreigners.

An alumnus of MTSU for his undergraduate degree in political science and Vanderbilt University for his law degree, Ozment has focused his practice in immigration law since 1998.

Ozment has provided initial consultations to more than 1,000 individuals and families and represented hundreds of clients in Immigration and Naturalization Services cases in Tennessee and around the country.

He has earned a number of awards and is a former member of the Tennessee House of Representatives.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Honors flyer72

 

ICYMI: Still time to register for accelerated Spanish course

MTSU is again offering a breakthrough learning experience during spring break with its accelerated language program that will get participants excited and confident about speaking Spanish.

Registration is open for the five-day program, which will run from 6 to 9 p.m. March 6-10 at the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building.

The course is offered by the Center for Accelerated Language Acquisition at MTSU. CALA Spanish instructor Brian Roberts said that the course structure is based on brain research to give learners a special interactive experience that results in accelerated knowledge of the language.

Click the image to see class offerings and to register for the 2016 Summer Language Institute.

Click the image to see class offerings and to register for the upcoming five-day accelerated Spanish class.

“The course aims to develop conversational abilities in a fun, low-stress classroom, and you will use movement, songs, games and stories to acquire the language naturally,” Roberts said.

“CALA courses develop participants’ abilities in some of the most commonly used communicative tools. At the end of the course, participants are able to recognize the rhythm of the language and are capable of producing enough language to compose basic communicative needs in Spanish.”

One student who took the course last semester shared this feedback with course organizers: “What I liked most was the laughter and high energy through storytelling. Everyone seemed to build off each other, and we were all excited about learning, which got me excited.”

Discounts are available for MTSU students, alumni, faculty and staff. To register or for more information, including course fees, visit www.mtsu.edu/cala or contact Roberts at brian.roberts@mtsu.edu.

— Faith Few, student writer (news@mtsu.edu)

Opportunities, ‘sense of community’ draw students to Honors open house

One student flew from Colorado, most of the high school students came from Tennessee, and the rest came from surrounding states in the South and Midwest.

With sunny, mid-70 degree weather prevailing outdoors for Presidents’ Day when most were out of school for the holiday, more than 700 people attended the MTSU Honors College open house Monday, Feb. 20.

Honors College Dean John Vile, right, greets prospective MTSU student Cameron Almonrode, who has questions about the program. (MTSU photos by Andy Heidt)

Honors College Dean John Vile, right, greets prospective MTSU student Cameron Almonrode, who has questions about the program. (MTSU photos by Andy Heidt)

MTSU’s University Honors College fosters the academic excellence and nurturing environment of a small, select, private liberal arts college within the setting of a major university. It also provides expert faculty, unique curricular and extracurricular experiences and “Collage,” an award-winning arts and literary magazine.

Attending a mock trial demonstration by MTSU students for the roomful of visitors and their parents, Cate Farone “loved the courtroom atmosphere. If I come here, I’m definitely going to be on the mock trial team.”

Farone, 18, of Murfreesboro, is a Father Ryan High School senior. This marked her “first official college visit,” though her parents, researchers and faculty members Tony and Mary Farone, each have worked more than 20 years on campus.

Cate Farone is one of the newest recipients of a Buchanan scholarship from the Honors College, the top award an MTSU undergraduate student can receive.

“Coming today, I definitely want to come here,” added Farone, who had an opportunity to talk with Student Government Association vice president Connor McDonald, a senior majoring in political science, the field she wants to pursue. “He was very interesting and helpful. I want to be a lawyer, and he told me about the law school process.”

Visiting MTSU with her mother, Zeinab Ali, Antioch High School senior Sunaya Ali of Nashville said she “didn’t know what the Honors College had to offer and details regarding the thesis. The 18-year-old is still deciding on a major; an older brother, Ayuub Ali, is a junior majoring in business in the Jennings A. Jones College of Business.

Making his first visit to campus, Juan Escobar, 17, another Antioch High senior from Nashville, has received a Provost Scholarship, but said he’s “looking at a couple of options with other schools.”

Honors College logo“I met a friend (Natenael Belete) who used to go to my high school,” added Escobar. “He told me some good things about the university. The Honors College has smaller classrooms, giving you a sense of community.”

Farone said she liked the university’s diversity, adding that she’s glad to see “different backgrounds and parts of the country and the world coming together at MTSU.”

Honors College Dean John Vile was more than pleased with the turnout.

“The Student Union ballroom was filled,” he said. “It’s been a great day.”

The university Admissions Office joined the Honors College in hosting the event. All of the university’s colleges, MTSU Housing and Residential Life and the MTSU Parent and Family Association shared information with the visitors.

The visit included tours of the James E. Walker Library; the Department of Aerospace’s air traffic control simulator; and the Department of Recording Industry, Center for Innovation in Media, Department of Electronic Media Communication Mobile Production Lab and more in the College of Media and Entertainment. The prospective students also observed “mad science” physics experiments and mock trial demonstration and had the option to hear the afternoon spring Honors Lecture Series talk by Keel Hunt of The Strategy Group, who brought “Political Speech: How Candidates Win and Leaders Lead” to the classroom.

More than 200 people attended a separate Celebration of Scholars event Feb. 19 at the home of MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee and his wife, Liz.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU physics and astronomy professor Eric Klumpe demonstrates a straight line wave to Honors College Presidents' Day Open House visitors during the the fun with physics "mad science" demonstration in the Student Union Parliamentary Room Feb. 20.

MTSU physics and astronomy professor Eric Klumpe demonstrates a straight line wave to Honors College Presidents’ Day Open House visitors during a “Fun with Physics: Mad Science” demonstration in the Student Union Parliamentary Room Feb. 20.

Click on the poster to see the full schedule of 2017 open house events.

Click on the poster to see the full schedule of 2017 open house events.

Honors lectures on ‘rhetoric in contemporary culture’ open to the public

The general public is once again welcome to join an MTSU Honors College class for the spring 2017 Honors Lecture Series each week for topics on “Rhetoric in Contemporary Culture.”

Honors Lecture Series poster

Click on the poster to see a larger PDF version.

The series continues at 3 p.m. Monday, Feb. 20, when MTSU alumnus Keel Hunt, a public affairs consultant, author and former journalist, will discuss “Political Speech: How Candidates Win and Leaders Lead.”

Honors College logoThe spring lecture series takes place from 3 to 3:55 p.m. every Monday with the exception of March 6, when MTSU students and faculty will begin spring break.

The lecture series ends April 10.

MTSU’s Honors Lecture Series, which is always free and open to the public, has been a staple in the fall and spring semesters for two decades. It features focused topics and presenters from multiple disciplines on and off campus and is a required course for upper-division Honors College students.

Lectures are held in the Simmons Amphitheatre, Room 106, in the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building. A searchable campus map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap. Off-campus visitors attending the lectures can obtain a special one-day parking permit at www.mtsu.edu/parking/visit.php.

Dr. Kaylene Gebert

Dr. Kaylene Gebert

Politics, social issues, climate change are among the upcoming lectures. To view the full schedule, visit http://mtsu.edu/honors/lecture-series/2017-spring.php.

“Rhetoric in Contemporary Culture” explores arguments that people use for various contemporary — and often controversial — topics, said Dr. Kaylene Gebert, an Honors College faculty member and a former university provost.

“While rhetoric is an ancient art, rhetoric or persuasion is clearly evident in our daily world, including a newer form: social media,” said Gebert, who collaborated with Associate Honors Dean Philip Phillips to develop the theme and to schedule presenters.

“The series provides a diverse, yet powerful, set of exemplars, pictures, arguments and studies that pervade our culture and attempt to persuade us,” Gebert said. “The goal of the series is to promote informed reflection and constructive dialogue on rhetoric and the pervasive role it plays in how we perceive the world around us.”

For more information about the Honors Lecture Series or MTSU’s University Honors College, call 615-898-2152.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Feb. 20 Honors open house targets high-ability prospective students

Most public and private secondary schools are closed for the Presidents’ Day Holiday. MTSU happens to be open.

That’s why the University Honors College and the Office of Admissions host public, private and homeschool students for the annual Presidents’ Day Open House.

John Vile, standing right, the Honors College dean, visits with incoming Buchanan Fellows and their families during the Honors College Presidents' Day Open House in this February 2016 file photo. (MTSU file photo by Andy Heidt)

John Vile, standing right, the Honors College dean, visits with incoming Buchanan Fellows and their families during the Honors College Presidents’ Day Open House in this February 2016 file photo. (MTSU file photos by Andy Heidt)

More than 500 prospective students and their parents will be attending the open house from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Feb. 20, all across the MTSU campus.

For more information about the open house, including the full schedule, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/honors/open-house.php. To register, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/schedule-a-visit/special-events.php. Parking is available in the Rutherford Lot (http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap), where visitors will be shuttled to campus.

The Honors College offers personalized teaching, smaller classes and a competitive edge in a more interactive learning environment for high-ability scholars. Take advantage of this opportunity to meet people who can answer questions and show you the campus and academic departments, including honors students, financial aid and scholarship staff and academic advisers.

“This has been one of our most popular events during the past few years,” said Honors College Dean John Vile.

Vile said the open house comes early enough for “high school sophomores and juniors to get an idea of MTSU before they begin applying for colleges and universities and late enough for seniors who are trying to decide which of the colleges or universities that have accepted them are the best fit.”

Honors College logoFor Vile, who is a political scientist and presidential historian, the open house provides the opportunity “to give my famous Presidents’ Day Quiz,” he added.

Optional events for attendees include a demonstration by the MTSU Mock Trial team, a “mad science” demonstration by physics and astronomy professor Eric Klumpe and tours of campus housing, recording industry, the Center for Innovation in Media, the Mobile Production Lab, Walker Library and aerospace’s air traffic control lab.

Attendees also are welcome to take in the 3 p.m. Honors Lecture Series led by Nashville’s Keel Hunt with The Strategy Group.

For more information, call 615-898-2152.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Dr. Eric Klumpe performs a physics demonstration for an audience attending the Honors College Presidents’ Day Open House in this February 2016 file photo.

Dr. Eric Klumpe performs a physics demonstration for an audience attending the Honors College Presidents’ Day Open House in this February 2016 file photo.

VA health leader brings ‘Trusted Leadership’ talk to MTSU campus

Jennifer Vedral-Baron, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System director, spoke on “Trusted Leadership” Jan. 26, in the Simmons Amphitheatre, Room 106, of the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building at MTSU.

Honors College logo cropped

Jennifer Vedral-Baron

Jennifer Vedral-Baron

“This presentation is another example of director Vedral-Baron’s commitment to MTSU and our students,” said Dr. Hilary Miller, director of the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center, one of the co-sponsors along with the University Honors College and the Omicron Delta Kappa National Leadership Honor Society.

“Since moving into her new position, the director has already attended a Graduating Veterans Stole Ceremony and been instrumental in providing academic and career opportunities to our students,” Miller added.

“The director’s leadership and military experience as well as her medical background should make the presentation appealing to many groups.”

The event was open to the public.

In 2016, Vedral-Baron retired as a captain after 30 years of active military service with the U.S. Navy. She most recently served as director of the Fort Belvoir Community Hospital in Fort Belvoir, Virginia, where she was awarded the Defense Superior Service Medal.

Daniels Veterans Center logo webDuring her service, she also received the the Legion of Merit Award three times, four Meritorious Service Medals, four Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medals and five Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals.

Vedral-Baron also holds the distinction of being the only U.S. Navy Hospital commanding officer to have led her teams to five Military Health System Patient Safety Awards.

The American Association of Nurse Practitioners selected her a fellow in 2011, and she also was recognized as a fellow in the American College of Healthcare Executives. She maintains certification as an adult nurse practitioner.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

As MTSU students and staff members listen, guest lecturer Jennifer Vedral-Baron discusses "Trusted Leadership" from her 30-year military career Jan. 26 in the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building's Simmons Amphitheatre. She is director of the Tennessee Valley Healthcare System. (MTSU photos by Eric Sutton)

As MTSU students and staff members listen, guest lecturer Jennifer Vedral-Baron discusses “Trusted Leadership” from her 30-year military career Jan. 26 in the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building’s Simmons Amphitheatre. She is director of the Tennessee Valley Healthcare System. (MTSU photos by Eric Sutton)

Jennifer Vedral-Baron, right, talks to a group of MTSU students following her "Trusted Leadership" talk Jan. 26 in the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building.

Jennifer Vedral-Baron, right, talks to a group of MTSU students following her “Trusted Leadership” talk Jan. 26 in the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building.

Tennessee Valley Healthcare Director Jennifer Vedral-Baron, top left, and event attendees listen as an MTSU student asks a question following her "Trusted Leadership" talk Jan. 26.

Tennessee Valley Healthcare Director Jennifer Vedral-Baron, top left, and event attendees listen as an MTSU student asks a question following her “Trusted Leadership” talk Jan. 26.

 

‘MTSU On the Record’ takes listeners to ‘Marguerite’s Landing’

An MTSU professor emerita, author of several prize-winning books, discussed her newest publication on a recent edition of the “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. June McCash

Dr. June McCash

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. June Hall McCash first aired Jan. 16 on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org. You can listen to their conversation below.

McCash Marguerite cover webMcCash’s latest historical novel is “Marguerite’s Landing,” which is based on the true story of a woman who fled with her family to Jekyll Island in the late 1700s as revolution created social upheaval in her native France.

The book’s protagonist, Marguerite du Bignon, is depicted as a plucky woman who endures setbacks and hardships while trying to create a home in a strange new land.

“She was the only woman, aside from her servants, on the island,” said McCash. “She had to come into a brand new culture she knew nothing about, learn a new language, and, I think, weave her way through a very difficult period of time historically.”

McCash is the author of 13 books, including four novels, eight nonfiction works and a book of poetry. She was named Georgia Author of the Year in 2011 and 2013 for her novels.

WMOT-new web logoA former professor of French in the MTSU Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, McCash is a recipient of both the MTSU Foundation’s Distinguished Research Award and Career Achievement Award. She also was the founding director of the university’s Honors Program, which evolved into the current University Honors College.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

Immigration’s role in American history is focus of ‘MTSU On the Record’

The impact of immigration in shaping the American experience is the topic of the next “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. John Vile

Dr. John Vile

Vile immigration book cover webHost Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. John Vile, dean of the University Honors College and a political scientist, will air from 8 to 8:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 9, and from 6 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 15, on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org.

Vile is the editor of “American Immigration and Citizenship: A Documentary History.” In this book, using a mixture of statutes, constitutional provisions, speeches, judicial decisions and interpretive essays, Vile traces changes in immigration policy over the years.

WMOT-new web logoIn the interview, Vile also comments on contemporary attitudes toward immigration stemming from current political controversies such as “sanctuary cities,” where mayors have refused to prosecute undocumented immigrants solely for violating federal immigration laws.

“For all practical purposes, the national government does set immigration policy,” said Vile, “but once they’re here, that does present a little bit different issue, and I think it will be sort of one of the flashpoints that we’ll just have to watch for and see how it’s resolved.”

The fall 2016 Honors College Lecture Series, which focused on “Citizenship, Refugees and Immigration,” featured Vile as one of the presenting scholars.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

This circa 1905 photo of the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor, created by the Detroit Photographic Co. and the focus of countless immigrants’ hopes since it opened in October 1886, is part of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division and is featured on the cover of MTSU political scientist John Vile’s book “American Immigration and Citizenship: A Documentary History.” (photo courtesy of the Library of Congress)

This circa 1905 photo of the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor, created by the Detroit Photographic Co. and the focus of countless immigrants’ hopes since it opened in October 1886, is part of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division and is featured on the cover of MTSU political scientist John Vile’s book “American Immigration and Citizenship: A Documentary History.” (photo courtesy of the Library of Congress)

MTSU Honors Transfer Fellowship has Feb. 15 application deadline

A special incentive in the form of a $3,500 scholarship for up to four semesters awaits prospective MTSU transfer students who meet the eligibility criteria and apply by the Feb. 15 deadline.

The MTSU Honors College is offering 30 Honors Transfer Fellowship awards, which are patterned after the highly successful Buchanan Fellows Program.

Dr. John Vile

Dr. John Vile

To apply, visit http://mtsu.edu/honors/transfer.php.

Chosen applicants will be a part of the fifth class of transfer students. The transfer fellowships began in 2013. In the previous four years, the Honors College awarded 15 such awards.

“In talking to President Sidney A. McPhee, this is two years after implementation of the Tennessee Promise (free community college tuition),” said John Vile, Honors College dean. “We are anticipating that significantly more community college graduates will be benefiting from that this year.”

The fellowship is open to students who anticipate having completed 60 hours of college or university coursework with a 3.5 GPA or better by the fall of 2017.

Honors College logoRecipients will gain special consideration for support for study abroad and for making presentations at scholarly conferences. Students who are accepted as fellows will complete a common class together during their first semester at MTSU.

For up to six out of state transfer recipients, the award will be $7,000 per semester because they pay higher tuition and fees, Vile said.

For those who do not receive the Honors Transfer Fellowship, MTSU Financial Aid also offers a guaranteed Transfer Promise Scholarship of $1,500 a semester to students with a 3.0 GPA who complete their application by Wednesday, Feb. 15.

Applications by mail must be postmarked by Feb. 15. Applications must include official transcripts of all college and university work, two letters of recommendation from college professors and/or honors administrators and a personal essay.

For more information, call 615-898-2152.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Secured By miniOrange