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Army honors MTSU’s McPhee, Huber with invitation to jump with Golden Knights

CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. — The Army’s Golden Knights precision parachute team will honor MTSU’s commitment to student veterans on Tuesday, April 25, by inviting President Sidney A. McPhee and retired Lt. Gen. Keith M. Huber to join them for a tandem parachute jump.

The recognition comes for MTSU’s substantial support efforts for student-veterans, the 2016 opening of the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center and its recent expansion into career placement.

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

Keith M. Huber

Keith M. Huber

It will be the first parachute jump for McPhee and the first free-fall jump for Huber, the university’s senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives. The administrators, each paired with a Golden Knights team member, will descend over Outlaw Field in Clarksville.

A Special Forces veteran with 38 years as an infantryman and a Green Beret, Huber earned his jump wings in hundreds of tethered descents, but he’s never conducted military free-fall jumps nor been involved in sport parachuting.

Former President George H.W. Bush jumped with the Golden Knights three times, most recently when he celebrated his 90th birthday in 2014.

U.S. Army Recruiting Battalion spokesman Lee Elder said the precision parachute team, which is visiting the Nashville area for the first time since 2004, hopes to draw awareness to career opportunities in the Army.

“We are truly honored that President McPhee and General Huber are making such a major investment of their time to participate with the Golden Knights,” Elder said.

“It’s typical of the support that MTSU has given our recruiting efforts for the regular Army and Army Reserve over the years. They’ve always gone all-out to help us in a number of endeavors, and this is just the latest example.”

Army Golden Knights-LogoMcPhee said it was difficult to turn down an invitation offered by the Golden Knights, especially since Huber personally delivered it to him.

“The record speed in which we built and opened the Daniels Center shows that it’s hard to say no to General Huber,” McPhee said. “How could I refuse this?”

McPhee said while he appreciates the Army’s nod toward MTSU’s efforts to attract, retain and graduate veterans, the true honor goes to those who serve.

“We at MTSU want to do right by to those who gave so much to our nation,” he said.

Huber said the offer to jump with the Golden Knights “is one of respect and appreciation for our programs.”

“Many academic campuses seek the title of ‘Vet Friendly’ as a slogan to attract future students,” he said, “but MTSU demonstrates a veteran and military family loyalty in a consistent and comprehensive manner.”

Huber said he was “honored to participate” alongside McPhee, adding that “represents another challenge to conquer your apprehension at 13,000 feet and to simply do what is right to honor our veterans.”

For more information about the Daniels center, visit www.mtsu.edu/military.

— Andrew Oppmann (andrew.oppmann@mtsu.edu)

‘MTSU On the Record’ studies science savvy for non-science teachers

Teaching teachers how to teach science is the subject of the next “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. Katherine Mangione

Dr. Katherine Mangione

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Katherine Mangione, an assistant professor in MTSU’s Department of Elementary and Special Education, will air from 9:30 to 10 p.m. Tuesday, April 25, and from 6 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, April 30, on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org.

Mangione asserts that student teachers, now known as preservice teachers, need special instruction to familiarize themselves with the lingo of scientific disciplines, especially if they are not particularly science-savvy.

WMOT-new web logo“Vocabulary in science is exceptionally precise,” said Mangione, “so when the science teacher is explaining the concept of a wave, he may mean something different in a physics class, but then your earth science teacher … may be teaching things like P-waves and S-waves before and after earthquakes or ocean waves.”

Mangione, biology professor Cindi Smith-Walters and Alyson Smith Bass, an associate professor of elementary and special education, wrote about their research in the Electronic Journal of Science Education. You can read the article here.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

MTSU Alumni Summer College ‘Greatest Hits’ awaits June 21-23 attendees

The 10th year of Alumni Summer College at MTSU will combine the best of the previous nine years, as music, food, athletics, history and more await an expected 100 attendees.

Alumni Summer College graphic“Greatest Hits: A Remix of ASC Classics” will be the theme for the June 21-23 event, which will be held at on- and off-campus venues.

Alumni Summer College is an annual three-day program presented by MTSU’s Office of Alumni Relations. Alumni and friends are invited to campus to connect with the university, learn about interesting subjects and have loads of fun, said Rhonda King, alumni assistant director.

MTSU faculty, alumni, and local experts present information in an “edutaining” way through classroom lectures and interactive field trips, King said.

Included are the classes, field trips, tour admissions, meals and traveling by coach buses. Lodging reservations are the responsibility of the participants.

Tuition is $250 per person. Space is limited, and there is a May 15 registration deadline. To learn more, visit www.mtalumni.com or call the Office of Alumni Relations at 615-898-2922.

Alumni Summer College participants are scheduled to hear from Hugh Berryman, nationally recognized forensic scientist. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

Alumni Summer College participants will hear from Dr. Hugh Berryman, nationally recognized forensic scientist. (MTSU file photo by J. Intintoli)

Each year focuses on a different theme that showcases MTSU’s work and study in that particular field, King said. Past themes have included “Exploring Our History,” “How Things Work,” “A Song’s Life,” “Wide World of Sports, “A Century in the Making,” “Whodunnit?”, “Stories from the American Civil War,” “The Science Around Us” and “Food for Thought.”

Here’s a sample of “classes” this year:

  • Touring Davis Science Building and Wiser-Patten Science Hall, which reopened in January after two years and $20 million in renovations.
  • An update from Dr. Hugh Berryman, nationally recognized forensic scientist, on the Mexican-American War Dead Identification Project. Remains of soldiers, most likely Tennesseans, were discovered in Mexico and returned to Dover Air Force Base in Delaware in 2016 after five years of negotiations, sparked by Berryman’s urging.
  • Insights on MTSU men’s and women’s basketball success from head coaches Kermit Davis and Rick Insell.
  • Learning about the MTSU Center for Coaching and Student Success from Department of Health and Human Performance professor Colby Jubenville. The College of Behavioral Sciences center has been designed to address the challenging gap between approaching graduation, graduation and securing gainful employment.
  • Scheduled visits to the Ryman Auditorium, backstage at the Grand Ole Opry and Studio A and dinner at Five Senses Restaurant.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

The world famous Ryman Auditorium in downtown Nashville will be a stop for those attending the 2017 MTSU Alumni Summer College June 21-23. (Photo by Chris Hollo)

The world famous Ryman Auditorium in downtown Nashville will be a stop for those attending the 2017 MTSU Alumni Summer College June 21-23. (Photo by Chris Hollo)

MT Engage celebrates student participation with inaugural reception

MT Engage, MTSU’s most recent Quality Enhancement Plan, or QEP, is igniting interest in students across academic disciplines wanting to further their education beyond the classroom.

The program honored students who completed at least one 2016-17 MT Engage course with the first MT Engage Student Reception, held Thursday, April 20, in the Tom H. Jackson Building. Students received refreshments, complimentary professional photos for the early arrivers and tokens of appreciation, including water bottles and T-shirts.

Students taking MT Engage courses were treated to T-shirts, refreshments and complimentary professional headshots at the inaugural MT Engage Student Reception held Thursday, April 20, in the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

An MTSU student displays one of the T-shirts that MT Engage program participants received at the inaugural MT Engage Student Reception held Thursday, April 20, in the Tom H. Jackson Building. Student participants also received water bottles, refreshments and complimentary professional photos. (MTSU photos by Jimmy Hart)

The event also allowed the 80-plus students who attended to ask questions about what to expect if they continue with MT Engage, which has a motto of “engage academically, learn exponentially, showcase yourself.”

MT Engage logo-webUniversity Studies professor Scott McDaniel, assessment coordinator for MT Engage, noted that students who enroll in MT Engage-based classes receive hands-on experience that allows them to apply the knowledge they already have.

“My colleague who teaches statistics had her students go to ‘Scholars Week’ and report on some of the posters and statistics that were used there, and they had to reflect on it,” McDaniel said.

Program officials expect students in these courses to learn and/or develop skills in self-assessment and reflection and connect their new knowledge to their experience.

“Other things we want professors to try to instill in students (are) making connections between disciplines, from statistics to biology or from history to English and even history to statistics,” he said.

McDaniel shared one exciting aspect of MT Engage called the e-Portfolio, an electronic record created by students throughout their academic journey to serve as an important tool in marketing themselves toward a career or graduate degree.

University Studies professor Scott McDaniel, right, assessment coordinator for MT Engage, checks in a student at the inaugural MT Engage Student Reception held Thursday, April 20, in the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

University Studies professor Scott McDaniel, right, assessment coordinator for MT Engage, checks in a student at the inaugural MT Engage Student Reception held Thursday, April 20, in the Tom H. Jackson Building.

“It’s hard to assess someone’s knowledge from just one snapshot,” he said. “Now we enter the e-Portfolio.”

As McDaniel explained, the e-Portfolio digitally adds completed works through a student’s time at MTSU, allowing them to create presentations for different audiences or future employers.

“Say they want to apply for a job and send not only their resume but also their e-Portfolio — it’s like the next best thing to meeting me.”

Current and future students will be able to learn more about the benefits of the latest QEP and the future of MT Engage during MT Engage Week, which will be held in September, and during through CUSTOMS new student orientations.

The QEP is a requirement by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, or SACSCOC, the regional accreditation body for higher education institutions in the South.

Also joining McDaniel at the reception were MT Engage Director Mary Hoffschwelle, who also is an MTSU history professor, and assistant director Lexy Denton.

Hoffschwelle said the student reception will become an annual event.

For more information about MT Engage, visit http://mtsu.edu/mtengage, email mtengage@mtsu.edu or call 615-904-8281.

— Jayla Jackson (news@mtsu.edu)

Students enjoy refreshments at the inaugural MT Engage Student Reception held Thursday, April 20, in the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

Students enjoy refreshments at the inaugural MT Engage Student Reception April 20 in the Tom H. Jackson Building.

MTSU Creative and Visual Services photographer Andy Heidt photographs an MT Engage student during the inaugural MT Engage Student Reception held Thursday, April 20, in the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

MTSU Creative and Visual Services photographer Andy Heidt photographs an MT Engage student during the inaugural MT Engage Student Reception April 20 in the Tom H. Jackson Building.

Students enjoy refreshments at the inaugural MT Engage Student Reception held Thursday, April 20, in the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

Students enjoy refreshments at the inaugural MT Engage Student Reception held Thursday, April 20, in the Tom H. Jackson Building.

Students were eligible for door prizes at the inaugural MT Engage Student Reception held Thursday, April 20, in the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

This photo shows some of the door prizes students were eligible to receive at the inaugural MT Engage Student Reception in the Tom H. Jackson Building.

MTSU entertains public, fights hunger at April 24 ‘End of Semester Show’

MTSU’s entertainment community is coming together Monday, April 24, for an “End of Semester Show” aimed at showcasing campus talent and industry partnerships with an eye toward helping hungry fellow students, too!

End Semester Show 2017 poster webThe program, set for 7 p.m. April 24 in Tucker Theatre, features MTSU recording industry songwriters opening for The Acorn People, a Nashville-based rock band of MTSU alumni.

Admission is a can of nonperishable food, which will be donated to the university’s Student Food Pantry.

CME-logo-webOrganizers from the College of Media and Entertainment, who say this year’s show may be the largest ever, note that the event involves teamwork from students, faculty, organizations, departments and colleges across campus as well as nonprofits and industry donors and partners in the community. For example:

  • Students in a recording industry Sound Reinforcement class are working alongside a Theater Lighting class from the Department of Theatre and Dance to plan and provide sound, lighting and production for the show.
  • Master of Fine Arts students in recording industry will be creating multitrack recordings of the performances.
  • Animation students from the Department of Electronic Media Communication are creating content for a $1.5 million video wall, again donated by veteran EMC partner VER Nashville and most recently used for the MT Raiders Choice Awards, that will be assembled on stage and used during the show.
  • Student-run radio station WMTS and AMP Entertainment, MTSU’s student-run entertainment organization, are providing event promotion.

In addition to VER’s video wall equipment donation, Nashville-based entertainment lighting systems company 4Wall and audiovisual supplier LMG Nashville are also donating equipment for this year’s show.

For more information about the event, email Rachel Helms, coordinator for the College of Media and Entertainment, at rachel.helms@mtsu.edu.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU on WGNS: Student veterans support, graduate programs, lifelong learning

MTSU faculty and staff took to WGNS Radio recently to share information about the university’s ongoing efforts to support student veterans, its myriad graduate program offerings and an upcoming series of classes for those who are lifelong learners.

The details were shared during the April 17 “Action Line” program with host Bart Walker. The live program was broadcast on FM 100.5, 101.9 and AM 1450 from the WGNS studio in downtown Murfreesboro. If you missed it, you can listen to a podcast of the show here.

Guests and their topics were as follows:

• Shane Smith, interim employer search agent, and Sean Martin, transition manager, in the new Daniels Center Veterans Transitioning Home Office at MTSU, discussed their roles and the services offered to student veterans and their families at the new office.

MTSU guests on the April 17 WGNS Radio program “Action Line” with host Bart Walker are shown here. At top left, from left to right, are Shane Smith and Sean Martin with the Daniels Center Veterans Transitioning Home Office at MTSU; bottom left, from left to right, are Dr. Derek Frisby and Connie Huddleston from the College of Liberal Arts; and bottom right, Dr. David Butler, vice provost for research and dean of the College of Graduate Studies. (MTSU photo illustration by Jimmy Hart)

MTSU guests on the April 17 WGNS Radio program “Action Line” with host Bart Walker are shown here. At top left, from left to right, are Shane Smith and Sean Martin with the Daniels Center Veterans Transitioning Home Office at MTSU; bottom left, from left to right, are Dr. Derek Frisby and Connie Huddleston from the College of Liberal Arts; and bottom right, Dr. David Butler, vice provost for research and dean of the College of Graduate Studies. (MTSU photo illustration by Jimmy Hart)

Located in Keathley University Center Room 316, the nearly 600-square-foot facility will allow Smith and Martin to match veterans and other MTSU students with prospective employers. Smith and Martin also are veterans.

Read more at http://www.mtsunews.com/veterans-transitioning-home-opens/.

• Dr. David Butler, the new vice provost for research and dean of the MTSU College of Graduate Studies, discusses his new roles on campus and what the College of Graduate Studies offers to the community.

Butler, 46, officially began at MTSU on Jan. 1, 2017. A native of Houston, Texas, Butler comes to MTSU from the University of Southern Mississippi, where he has served as chair in the Department of Political Science and director of the doctoral program in International Development.

The MTSU College of Graduate Studies, considered a leader in graduate education in Tennessee, provides academic, financial and other support services for graduate students while upholding academic standards. More than 100 programs of study are offered to students.

Read more at http://www.mtsunews.com/new-research-graduate-dean/.

• Connie Huddleston, coordinator for the College of Liberal Arts, and Dr. Derek Frisby, professor of military and Tennessee history and geography, discussed the upcoming 2017 Lifelong Learning Program

The College of Liberal Arts is pleased to again offer the program, a homework-free, exam-free classroom experience for older learners. It is slated for four Mondays — May 1, 8, 15, and 22 — in the Ingram Building, located at 2269 Middle Tennessee Blvd. in Murfreesboro. The cost is only $20 per course.

This year’s courses include: “Reflections on Vietnam” with Frisby, an MTSU alum and Marine Corps veteran teaching military and Tennessee history and geography; “Jazz Transition in the ‘60s” with Dr. Don Aliquo, a saxophonist and professor of Saxophone and Jazz Studies at MTSU; and “Eastern Philosophy” with Dr. Jack Purcell, who was raised in the traditions of India.

For more information, visit http://mtsu.edu/liberalarts/lifelong.php.

Students, faculty and staff who are interested in guesting on WGNS to promote their MTSU-related activities should contact Jimmy Hart, director of news and media relations, at 615-898-5131 or via email at jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu.

MTSU collects more than 92 pounds of unwanted medications

Dominic Cooper was one of dozens of MTSU employees and area residents bringing their old, unwanted medical prescriptions and over-the-counter drugs to campus Thursday (April 20).

It was for the annual MTSU Drug Take-Back Day, a 5½-hour collection held adjacent to the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center on the east side of campus.

Campus Pharmacy's Tabby Ragland accepts unwanted prescription drugs from Don Daniel April 20 at the collection site adjacent to the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

Campus Pharmacy’s Tabby Ragland accepts unwanted prescription drugs from Don Daniel April 20 at the collection site adjacent to the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

It was part of the Drug Enforcement Agency’s overall national efforts to remove excess drugs from communities where they could be abused or misused, diverted into the wrong hands or disposed of in environmentally unsafe ways.

By the end of the collection period, MTSU officials collected 92.2 pounds — a 20 percent increase from fall 2016.

A relatively new MTSU employee, Cooper said it was his first time to bring his unwanted medications to the university.

“I have been trying to get rid of these,” said Cooper, a West Tennessee admissions counselor in the Office of Admissions. “I would rather they be in safe hands than at my house sitting in the bathroom medicine cabinet.”

Cooper said one of his medicines, a strong pain pill, was one that was prescribed for him after dental work, but he really did not need it because he’s “good with pain.”

Assisting Campus Pharmacy director Tabby Ragland and Health Promotions director Lisa Schrader in the spring collection were Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy doctoral students Kara Stockdale and Kaylee Cerminara. Both are from Nashville.

The drug take-back event is a joint venture between the pharmacy and Campus Police.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU pharmacist Tabby Ragland, foreground, and Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy doctoral students Kaylee Cerminara, left, and Kara Stockdale, inspect medications collected during the April 20 MTSU Drug Take-Back Day next to the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU pharmacist Tabby Ragland, foreground, and Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy doctoral students Kaylee Cerminara, left, and Kara Stockdale, inspect medications collected during the April 20 MTSU Drug Take-Back Day next to the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

 

Walker Library exhibit showcases memories of Welty’s life, work

Dr. J. Lee Owen reminisced about his passion for searching for and collecting vintage books, especially first edition print copies by southern author Eudora Welty from his hometown of Jackson, Mississippi.

Michael Kreyling, professor emeritus of English at Vanderbilt University, squeezed decades of research and insight regarding Welty, who wrote about the American South, especially her native Mississippi, into a captivating 40-minute talk.

With images of the southern author in the background, Vanderbilt University Professor Emeritus Michael Kreyling shares stories about Eudora Welty. (MTSU photos by James Cessna)

With images of the southern author in the background, Vanderbilt University Professor Emeritus Michael Kreyling shares stories about Eudora Welty. (MTSU photos by James Cessna)

Owen, Kreyling and others spoke on the occasion of the opening of the “Eudora Welty: Her Life and Legacy” exhibit that will continue through Thursday, May 4, in Special Collections, Room 444, in and the James E. Walker Library.

The exhibit is free and open to the public. To find the library and nearby parking, visit http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap. To learn about visitor parking regulations, including free parking in the Rutherford lots, purchasing a one-day parking permit and more, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/parking/visitors.php.

Owen and his wife, Sophia, who live in Murfreesboro, knew Welty, who died in 2001. J. Lee Owen, a pediatrician in Jackson for 50 years, became charmed with her works.

“Miss Welty was a wonderful and gifted Mississippi lady,” Owen said. “… She got everything (award-wise) except one thing — a Nobel Prize — and she should’ve gotten that.”

He shared a story of attending a used book sale and finding a signed, first edition Welty book. The price marked was $2.

“I thought I’d found a pot of gold,” said Owen, knowing the true value of the book. He quickly grabbed some cookbooks for his wife, and in the final exchange needed one more item to finish the $13.75 transaction he paid with in cash. “I bought a $3,500 book for $2 and a (25-cent) doughnut.”

Vanderbilt University Professor Emeritus Michael Kreyling, left, discusses various photographs of author Eudora Welty with MTSU Honors College associate dean Philip Phillips and Walker Library Dean Bonnie Allen. (MTSU photo by James Cessna)

Vanderbilt University Professor Emeritus Michael Kreyling, left, discusses various photographs of author Eudora Welty with MTSU Honors College associate dean Philip Phillips and James E. Walker Library Dean Bonnie Allen during the opening of the exhibit.

After being introduced by Honors College associate dean Philip Phillips, Kreyling told the audience, “I wish I could’ve found that book.” Owen’s quick response: “Everything has a price.” It generated laughter from attendees.

Kreyling, who met Welty for the first time in 1973, retraced the author’s career through research-based stories and online images from the 1930s forward.

“She was just like a (regular) person more than a (famous) author,” he said.

Walker Library Dean Bonnie Allen said she is just thrilled the collection was made available for 30 days.

“I hope our students take advantage of this excellent opportunity,” she said. “It’s a valuable collection of a southern author and a great one at that.”

Phillips recognized the efforts of his research assistant, Megan Donelson, a doctoral English student from Wooster, Ohio, who was co-curator with him, and Susan Lyons, who befriended the Owens and learned about the Welty collection.

Laura Owen of Nashville and Margaret Showalter of Murfreesboro, two of the Owens’ four children, attended the opening event.

The exhibit is sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts, Department of English, Honors College and Walker Library.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Dr. J. Lee Owen, right, who has a collection of southern author Eudora Welty’s works, shares stories with MTSU Honors College students Hannah Berthelson, left, and Benjamin Koulas. The Welty collection continues through May 4 in Special Collections in the James E. Walker Library.

Dr. J. Lee Owen, right, who has a collection of southern author Eudora Welty’s works, shares stories with MTSU Honors College students Hannah Berthelson, left, and Benjamin Koulas. The Welty collection continues through May 4 in Special Collections in the James E. Walker Library.

The “Eudora Welty: Her Life and Legacy” exhibit will continue through May 4 in the James E. Walker Library. Attending the opening event April 4 were Michael Kreyling, professor emeritus of English at Vanderbilt University; co-curator and MTSU doctoral English student Megan Donelson; collection owner Dr. J. Lee Owen; and Honors College associate dean Philip Phillips, an exhibit co-curator.

The “Eudora Welty: Her Life and Legacy” exhibit will continue through May 4 in the James E. Walker Library. Attending the opening event April 4 were Michael Kreyling, professor emeritus of English at Vanderbilt University; co-curator and MTSU doctoral English student Megan Donelson; collection owner Dr. J. Lee Owen; and Honors College associate dean Philip Phillips, an exhibit co-curator.


Eudora Welty collection visits Walker Library through May 4

From a friendship with physician J. Lee Owen and his wife, Sophia, MTSU’s Susan Lyons learned about the Owens’ collection of celebrated author Eudora Welty’s works. Now the Owens have brought the collection to campus for a free, public 30-day exhibit.

“Eudora Welty: Her Life and Legacy,” a special exhibition of rare materials from J. Lee Owen’s Welty collection, will be on display from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday through May 4 in Special Collections, Room 444, in the James E. Walker Library.

Eudora Welty flyer72

To find the library and nearby parking, visit http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap. Off-campus visitors can obtain a special one-day permit www.mtsu.edu/parking/visitors.php.

Welty, a short story writer and novelist who lived her entire life (1909-2001) in Jackson, Mississippi, wrote about the American South. Her works included “The Optimist’s Daughter,” which was published in 1972 and earned a Pulitzer Prize in 1973.

After college, Welty worked in radio, wrote society columns for the Memphis Commercial Appeal and took photographs as a junior publicity agent for the Works Progress Administration. The photos were exhibited in New York but weren’t published, at her request.

Her first publication of many was a short story, “Death of a Traveling Salesman.”

An opening event held April 4 featured presentations by Owen and Michael Kreyling, professor emeritus of English at Vanderbilt University and an authority on Welty’s life and works.

“Eudora Welty is recognized as one of the great Southern authors and one of the most significant writers of the 20th century,” said University Honors College associate dean Philip Phillips.

He recently went to Jackson with co-curator Megan Donelson, a doctoral English student from Wooster, Ohio, and Lyons, the Honors College’s special events coordinator, to visit the archives, secure photographs and gain additional background for the MTSU exhibit.

“She is best known for her short stories and her novels, including ‘The Optimist’s Daughter,’ a semi-autobiographical work,” he added.

Phillips said the MTSU exhibit “aims to showcase the variety of other work, which also includes original photographs and provides an overview of her life and influences.”

“It’s a really impressive collection that expresses Welty not just as a great writer, but that she had deep, loyal friendships and a great sense of humor,” said Donelson, who has studied museum exhibit design as an MTSU graduate student.

Lyons has known the Owens for two years, meeting them through a monthly technology program Honors College students attend.

“Dr. Owen shared with me about his Eudora Welty collection and introduced me to her stories,” Lyons said. “I knew the collection was special, so I shared about it with Drs. Phillips and (John) Vile.” She eventually introduced Owen to Phillips and Vile, dean of the Honors College.

Lee Owen was a pediatrician in Jackson, Mississippi, for 50 years before he and his wife moved to Murfreesboro.

The exhibit is sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts, Department of English, Honors College and Walker Library in partnership with Eudora Welty LLC and the Mississippi Department of Archives and History.

For information about Special Collections, contact Alan Boehm, Special Collections librarian, at 615-904-8501 or Alan.Boehm@mtsu.edu.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Sophia and Dr. J. Lee Owen are shown in their Murfreesboro home. A special exhibition of rare materials from the Eudora Welty collection of J. Lee Owen will be at MTSU from April 4 to May 4. (MTSU photo by

Sophia and Dr. J. Lee Owen are shown in their Murfreesboro home. A special exhibition of rare materials from Lee Owen’s Eudora Welty collection will be at MTSU from April 4 to May 4. (MTSU photo by Susan Lyons)

MTSU hosts tail-wagging 5K trek April 30 to benefit Habitat for Humanity

Human walkers and runners are invited to accompany their furry, four-footed canine companions in the annual fundraiser for Habitat for Humanity set Sunday, April 30, on the MTSU campus.

Two- and four-legged participants make their way around Old Main Circle at MTSU in the 2016 "See Spot Run" 5K Run/Walk for Habitat for Humanity. The 2017 event is set Sunday, April 30. (Photo courtesy of MTSU See Spot Run)

Two- and four-legged participants make their way around Old Main Circle at MTSU in the 2016 “See Spot Run” 5K Run/Walk for Habitat for Humanity. The 2017 event is set Sunday, April 30. (Photo courtesy of MTSU See Spot Run)

The 12th annual See Spot Run 5K Run/Walk, sponsored by the MTSU Office of Student Organizations and Service and the MTSU chapter of Sigma Pi Fraternity, is slated for 8 a.m. April 30.

Registration will begin at 6:45 a.m. race day at Peck Hall. The entry fee before Monday, April 24, is $30, and on race day, the fee will be $35.

Each entry fee includes dry-fit style shirts for all participants and awards for the top age-group finishers. All proceeds will support the MTSU Habitat Blitz Build and Rutherford County Habitat for Humanity.

A discounted group rate of $25 per person is available for organizations that have 15 or more participants. Organizations must pre-register by 4:30 p.m. April 24 in Room 330 of the MTSU Student Union to qualify for the discount.

Although participants aren’t required to run or walk with a dog to enter, those who do bring their pets must provide valid rabies tag numbers. Retractable leashes are prohibited.

See Spot Run logo web

Chip timing is available for all participants. A map of the race route is available online here.

Racers may register online at www.active.com or by mailing in a printable registration form, found here, with payment to MTSU, 1301 E. Main St., P. O. Box 39, Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37132.

For more information, contact the Office of Student Organizations and Service at 615-898-5812 or visit www.mtsu.edu/sos/see-spot-run.php.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU plans Veteran and Family Benefits Expo for community April 22

Veterans at MTSU and across the Middle Tennessee region are welcome to attend the Veteran and Family Benefits Expo, which will be held from 2 to 6 p.m. Saturday, April 22, on campus, event organizers said.

The benefits expo featuring at least 20 vendors will be held outside the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center, 1848 Blue Raider Drive, on the east side of campus in Murfreesboro.

Veteran and Family Benefits Expo in the Campus Rec Center.

Veteran and Family Benefits Expo in the Campus Rec Center.

In the event of rain, activities will move inside one of the Campus Recreation Center gymnasiums. To find the rec center and nearby parking, visit http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Sponsored by The Journey Home Project, MTSU Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veteran and Military Family Center and June Anderson Center for Women and Nontraditional Students, the expo is held to help veterans and their family members be aware of available assistance

“We welcome people from the community and campus, and want them to bring their families,” said Heather Conrad, counselor and rehabilitation counselor for VetSuccess on Campus.

Veteran service providers will include Greenhouse Ministries, Waffle House, Two Men and a Truck, Vietnam Veterans of America, Tennessee Department of Labor Mobile “Career Coach,” Tennessee Valley Health Services Women’s Health Center, Rolling Thunder Inc., Whelen Security, Wounded Warrior Project, Veterans Recovery Center/Mental Health Counsel and more.

Food is being provided by The Journey Home Project and will be served from 4 to 6 p.m.

Families are welcome to utilize the rec center’s indoor pool during the event.

The event will be hosted by the Blue Raider American Veteran Organization, or BRAVO, Tennessee Department of Labor, VetSuccess of Campus, Veterans Benefits Administration and Veterans Health Administration.

For more information, call 615-898-2974 or 615-898-2540.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

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