Logo

‘The Garden Party’: MTSU TXMD Runway Show scheduled April 1

Career-conscious MTSU student fashion majors’ and others’ work will be on display at The Garden Party: the annual Textiles, Merchandising and Design, or TXMD, Runway Show.

The event will be held starting at 5:30 p.m. Saturday, April 1, at the Miller Education Center, 503-509 Bell Street, in Murfreesboro. Doors will open at 4:30. To find parking at the center, visit http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

MTSU senior Jessie Hindes walks down the runway at the 2016 MTSU TXMD show. (MTSU file photo by Darby Campbell)

MTSU senior Jessie Hindes walks down the runway at the 2016 MTSU TXMD show. (MTSU file photo by Darby Campbell)

The student-produced, approximately 90-minute show is open to the public. Tickets are required and can be purchased through https://tinyurl.com/lksgggq.

Ticket prices, which help provide scholarships for current and potential students in the Department of Human Science’s TXMD program, are $20 and $50 for VIP seating.

The MTSU TXMD Runway Show is the final event scheduled for MTSU Scholars Week as recognition of creativity and scholarly endeavor. Any MTSU student was welcome to participate.

MTSU students will construct every garment showcased at the event. Garments can be repurposed from an existing garment (to encourage sustainability), made from a commercial pattern (emphasizing sewing skills) or made from an original pattern (emphasizing design and construction skills).

“Fashion is documented as the number one growth industry in Middle Tennessee,” said Rick Cottle, assistant professor in the textiles, merchandising and design program. “Apparel is the number two consumer good (behind only food) in the world.”

Cottle said MTSU TXMD is the only apparel design program and the largest fashion merchandising program offered by a Tennessee public institution.

“We are proud of our students and strive to provide this growth industry with both design and merchandising entry-level employees who are well prepared,” Cottle said.

A highlight of the show is the senior apparel design student showcase. Each senior will be showing an original fashion line of at least four garments.

Past participants in this show have gone on to show at Nashville Fashion Week, Utah Fashion Week and New York Fashion Week, Cottle said.

For more information, contact Cottle at 615-494-8752 or Rick.Cottle@mtsu.edu.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

The Garden Party Flyer (Final)

MTSU’s WMOT Roots Radio adds video outlet by joining VuHaus network

MTSU’s WMOT Roots Radio 89.5 FM is creating a new connection with its audience by affiliating with VuHaus, a web platform that showcases music videos and livestreams created by public radio stations.

WMOT-new web logoThe partnership is officially being launched today, March 28, at 5 p.m. Central with a special live performance of the Americana/folk band The Stray Birds from the Aurora Nashville studios in downtown Nashville that will be broadcast at www.wmot.org and www.vuhaus.com/nashville.

WMOT, which broadcasts at 89.5 FM as well as online at www.wmot.org, is a charter member of National Public Radio since 1969 and the region’s only Americana music channel. It teamed up last October with the NPR-distributed “World Cafe” music program to create a new Nashville-headquartered content hub, “World Cafe Nashville,” that focuses on expanded coverage of music and artists from Nashville and the South.

VuHaus logo webVuHaus, a Boulder, Colorado-based nonprofit collaboration operated by Public Media Company, curates music videos and livestreamed performances from a network that includes public radio stations in New York City, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Dallas/Fort Worth, Boston, Seattle, St. Louis and more, including West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s “Mountain Stage.”

This new affiliation with VuHaus gives the WMOT/World Cafe Nashville partnership an even larger showcase for Music City’s legacy, which includes classic country music, bluegrass, singer/songwriter, folk, soul, R&B and old-school rock ‘n’ roll, officials said.

“WMOT is thrilled to join VuHaus as an affiliate to present Americana music and artists with partner World Café in Nashville,” says Val Hoeppner, executive director of WMOT Roots Radio.

“At WMOT, we are building a culture of discovery, and this partnership will further our efforts to bring attention to Nashville artists and the sound that is distinctly our Middle Tennessee heritage.”

Val Hoeppner

Val Hoeppner

Roger LaMay

Roger LaMay

WMOT-FM, a 100,000-watt professional radio station housed in the Center for Innovation in Media inside the university’s Bragg Media and Entertainment Building, changed formats last September from its classical, jazz and news-talk focus to Americana in a partnership with Music City Roots, a Nashville-based firm that provides programming for both radio and television.

WMOT airs World Cafe, a daily two-hour music program produced by public radio station WXPN in Philadelphia and syndicated by NPR to more than 200 stations across America, each night at 10 Central. The program was launched in 1991 and features a mix of artist interviews and in-studio performances from almost every musical genre.

“In launching World Cafe Nashville with NPR Music as a southern hub for World Cafe, we were delighted to partner with a great local station in WMOT,” says Roger LaMay, general manager of WXPN and chair of the VuHaus board of directors.

“Extending this commitment to exposing the incredible music of Nashville and the region to a video channel on VuHaus is an important next step. “

For more information about WMOT Roots Radio 89.5 FM, part of MTSU’s College of Media and Entertainment, visitwww.wmot.org. For more information about World Cafe, visit http://xpn.org/world-cafe. To learn more about VuHaus, visit http://www.vuhaus.com.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

The WMOT Roots Radio page at VuHaus is shown in this screen grab. Click on the image to visit the site.

The WMOT Roots Radio page at VuHaus is shown in this screen grab. Click on the image to visit the site.

Learn how students are tackling local homelessness on ‘MTSU On the Record’

MTSU students’ efforts to devise a better way for Murfreesboro to help the homeless are the topic of the next “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. Michael Sherr

Dr. Michael Sherr

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Michael Sherr, chair of MTSU’s Department of Social Work, will air from 9:30 to 10 p.m. Tuesday, March 28, and from 6 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, April 2, on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org.

Sherr and his students are working with the city of Murfreesboro to study the concept of a centralized campus where social service agencies could establish satellite offices, creating a “one-stop” environment for many types of assistance.

WMOT-new web logoCoordinating with the Homeless Alliance of Rutherford County, the MTSU contingent hopes to have a proposal to present to the City Council in May. One graduate student and two undergraduate students have been working with Sherr since January on the project, which is being funded with a $15,000 grant from the city.

The social work majors are gaining valuable internship experience at The Journey Home, 308 W. Castle St., working 20 to 25 hours each week with homeless individuals.

“The problem is getting worse,” said Sherr. “The city is getting bigger … [and] there are enough people, enough stakeholders from different parts of our community that need and want to make something happen.”

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

MTSU on WGNS: Fermentation degree, Alumni Spring Showcase, Scholars Week

MTSU faculty and staff took to WGNS Radio recently to share information about the university’s new fermentation science degree, a revamped alumni-oriented event and the just started Scholars Week activities .

The details were shared during the March 20 “Action Line” program with host Bart Walker. The live program was broadcast on FM 100.5, 101.9 and AM 1450 from the WGNS studio in downtown Murfreesboro. If you missed it, you can listen to a podcast of the show here.

Guests and their topics were as follows:

The March 20 WGNS “Action Line” program featured, counterclockwise from top left, Dr. Tony Johnston, professor in the School of Agribusiness and Agriscience; Dr. Susan Myers-Shirk, interim history department chair; and Paul Wydra, assistant director in the Alumni Relations Office. (MTSU photo illustration by Jimmy Hart)

The March 20 WGNS “Action Line” program featured, counterclockwise from top left, Dr. Tony Johnston, professor in the School of Agribusiness and Agriscience; Dr. Susan Myers-Shirk, interim history department chair; and Paul Wydra, assistant director in the Alumni Relations Office. (MTSU photo illustration by Jimmy Hart)

• Tony Johnston, professor in the School of Agribusiness and Agriscience, discussed MTSU’s new fermentation science degree program.

Johnston wrote the proposal for the new fermentation science major, the first degree program of its type in Tennessee.

Read more at http://www.mtsunews.com/mtsu-crafts-fermentation-degree/.

• Paul Wydra, assistant director in the Alumni Relations Office, discussed the new Alumni Spring Showcase set for April 7-15.

The MTSU Alumni Relations Office is launching the new initiative to attract more alumni back to campus and deepen interaction with current students and the wider community.

See the full slate of events at mtalumni.com: http://bit.ly/2mWawvg.

• Dr. Susan Myers-Shirk, professor and interim chair in the Department of History, discussed MTSU Scholars Week activities.

Best-selling author and cultural critic Nicholas Carr is giving a keynote address for MTSU’s Scholar Week at 7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 27, in the Student Union Ballroom. The event is free and open to the public. A book signing will follow.

MTSU Scholars Week is an annual weeklong celebration of research, scholarship, and creative projects and will take place March 27-31 this year.

For more about Scholars Week, visit http://mtsu.edu/scholarsweek.

Students, faculty and staff who are interested in guesting on WGNS to promote their MTSU-related activities should contact Jimmy Hart, director of news and media relations, at 615-898-5131 or via email at jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu.

MTSU research is focus of annual Scholars Week March 27-April 1

Research, special events and performances are being showcased March 27-April 1 during the annual MTSU Scholars Week, which recognizes the ongoing scholarly efforts and research at the university.

MTSU senior photography major Kirsten Coutts, left, of Russellville, Ark., receives help in flying a drone simulator online from Jacob Andrews, a sophomore aerospace unmanned aircraft systems major, at the Drones iVue table March 27 during the Jones College of Business Scholars Week Business Plan Competition in the Student Union Building. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

MTSU senior photography major Kirsten Coutts, left, of Russellville, Ark., receives help in flying a drone simulator online from Jacob Andrews, a sophomore aerospace unmanned aircraft systems major, at the Drones iVue table March 27 during the Jones College of Business Scholars Week Business Plan Competition in the Student Union Building. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

Colleges, centers and departments hold Scholars Day activities during the week. The universitywide Scholars Day runs from 12:40 to 3:15 p.m. Friday, March 31.

To conclude the week, the Department of Human Science’s textiles, merchandising and design program will hold its annual Garden Party 2017 TXMD Runway Show at 5 p.m. Saturday, April 1, in the Miller Education Center on Bell Street.

Tickets are required and can be purchased through https://tinyurl.com/lksgggq.

For more information and the full schedule, visit www.mtsu.edu/scholarsweek. All events are open to the public.

To find parking, visit http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap. To learn about parking regulations for visitors, visit www.mtsu.edu/parking/visitors.php.

Helping kick events off March 27 are:

  • Dr. Tim Odegard, Murfree Chair of Excellence in Dyslexic Studies at MTSU, speaking at 5:30 p.m. in College of Education Building Room 160.
  • Scholars Week web bannerNoted author Nicholas “Nick” Carr, presenting the Scholars Week keynote adress at 7 p.m. in the Student Union Ballroom. His talk is expected to center on the influence of the Internet.
  • A free performance by traditional string musicians Bobby Taylor on fiddle and Ken Perlman on banjo at 8 p.m. in MTSU’s State Farm Lecture Hall, Room S-102, in the Business and Aerospace Building, presented by the Center for Popular Music.

The Strickland Visiting Scholar Program and the MTSU Distinguished Lecturers Fund are sponsoring Carr’s keynote with additional support from the Department of Computer Information Systems, the Department of History, the Office of the Provost, the Office of Research and the College of Liberal Arts.

Faculty and Scholars Week committee member Andrienne Friedli reports the number of posters for the universitywide Scholars Day March 31 “has grown by 25 percent over Scholars Week 2016.”

Performances are scheduled for 11:30 a.m. and 2:15 p.m. March 31 in the area just outside the ballroom.

For more information, call 615-494-7600.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU senior organizational communications major Brooke Greene, left, of Knoxville, Tenn., offers faculty member and Scholars Week committee member Andrienne Friedli the opportunity to smell carpet treated to eliminate odors March 27 at the Smells Don't Sell table as part of the Jones College of Business Scholars Week Business Plan Competition in the Student Union.

MTSU senior organizational communications major Brooke Greene, left, of Knoxville, Tenn., offers Dr. Andrienne Friedli a chance to smell carpet treated to eliminate odors March 27 at the “Smells Don’t Sell” table in the Jones College of Business Scholars Week Business Plan Competition in the Student Union. Friedli is an MTSU chemistry professor and Scholars Week committee member.


Noted author Nick Carr helps kick off MTSU Scholars Week March 27

Best-selling author and culture critic Nicholas “Nick” Carr will deliver the MTSU Scholars Week keynote address at 7 p.m. Monday, March 27, in the Student Union Ballroom.

A group of MTSU students will meet and visit with Carr — 2011 Pulitzer Prize finalist and author of New York Times bestselling book “The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains” in the general nonfiction category — before his talk.

Nick Carr

Nick Carr

The lecture is open to the public. To find parking and the Student Union, visit http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Scholars Week emphasizes the research, scholarly efforts and collaboration of undergraduate and graduate students and faculty. To learn more about Scholars Week at MTSU, including a complete schedule of events March 27-31, www.mtsu.edu/scholarsweek/index.php.

Carr is a stimulating and thought-provoking speaker on issues related to technology, culture and business, according to his website, www.nicholascarr.com.

In his presentation, Carr will provide an examination of how the Internet influences the brain and its neutral pathways, concluding with a petition for balancing our human and computer interactions.

Dr. Susan Myers-Shirk

Dr. Susan Myers-Shirk

“He’ll be talking about the Internet and how it has changed the way we read, write and think,” said Dr. Susan Myers-Shirk, interim chair in the Department of History. “It’s an ideal keynote lecture for Scholars Week because the Internet has clearly changed how scholars work.”

Myers-Shirk said she and other Scholars Week leaders look forward to Carr’s appearance.

He has spoken to professional and academic audiences around the world, including providing the keynote address at Google’s first Atmosphere conference in London, England; at the Seoul Digital Forum; at Futurecom in Rio de Janiero, Brazil; Dreamforce conference in San Francisco, California; and at MIT, Dartmouth, Harvard, NASA and other schools and institutions.

Carr’s books have been published in 30 countries.

The keynote lecture is presented by the Strickland Visiting Scholar Program and the MTSU Distinguished Lecturers Fund with additional support from the Department of Computer Information Systems, the Department of History, the Office of the Provost, the Office of Research and the College of Liberal Arts.

You can listen to Myers-Shirk discuss Carr’s visit on a recent edition of “MTSU On the Record,” which aired on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org, below.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Nick Carr, center, author of "The Shallows" and 2017 MTSU Scholars Week keynote, visits with students Lydia Harris, left, and Matthew Clements. Carr had dinner with history and computer information systems students in the BAS Sun Trust Room. Harris is a master's public history major from Antioch, Calif., while Clements is a senior and CIS major from Mt. Juliet, Tenn. (MTSU photos by Eric Sutton)

Nick Carr, center, author of “The Shallows” and 2017 MTSU Scholars Week keynote, visits with students Lydia Harris, left, and Matthew Clements. Carr had dinner with history and computer information systems students in the BAS Sun Trust Room. Harris is a master’s public history major from Antioch, Calif., while Clements is a senior and CIS major from Mt. Juliet, Tenn. (MTSU photos by Eric Sutton)

MTSU senior Titus Ballentine, left, and freshman Haley O'Neal, right, are shown with Scholars Week keynote speaker and noted author Nick Carr just before a dinner Carr had with computer information systems and history students March 27 in the BAS Sun Trust Room. Both are history majors.

MTSU senior Titus Ballentine, left, and freshman Haley O’Neal, right, are shown with Scholars Week keynote speaker and noted author Nick Carr just before a dinner Carr had with computer information systems and history students March 27 in the BAS Sun Trust Room. Both are history majors.

Blackman Collegiate Academy explores MTSU science options

Blackman Collegiate Academy juniors sampled science at MTSU and the University Honors College during a Friday (March 24) visit to campus.

Geosciences, biology, physics and astronomy, Concrete Industry Management and the university’s Experimental Vehicles Program were areas the Blackman High School students discovered in the school’s second visit to MTSU this year.

MTSU biology chair Lynn Boyd addresses research and career opportunities in her field March 24 in the new Science Building during the Blackman Collegiate Academy Day at MTSU. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

MTSU biology chair Lynn Boyd addresses research and career opportunities in her field March 24 in the Science Building during the Blackman Collegiate Academy Day at MTSU. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

The MTSU-Blackman partnership is one of several arranged each semester during the academic year. It allows freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors opportunities to spend time on the college campus, meeting MTSU students, faculty and administrators and learning about many of the university’s 140-plus programs.

As part of the partnership, which is designed to give them a competitive edge as they prepare for college, juniors and seniors in the academy who meet eligibility standards can take up to six hours of university courses taught by MTSU instructors at Blackman at no cost. The credits will count on high school and college transcripts.

Diamond Bradley, 17, was one of nearly 10 students taking in a 45-minute session on concrete. They even made concrete coasters.

“This has been a good experience,” Bradley said at the conclusion of the session. “I had trouble with mine, but I enjoyed the process. There’s a lot to learn off simple concrete. There’s a lot to the process.”

Classmate Gabrielle Brown, 16, liked the fact “a lot of job opportunities” can be found in the concrete industry.

Blackman High School junior Gabriele Brown makes a concrete coaster during a session led by Concrete Industry Management's Nicole Green as part of the March 24 Blackman Collegiate Academy Day at MTSU.

Blackman High School junior Gabriele Brown makes a concrete coaster during a session led by Concrete Industry Management’s Nicole Green as part of the March 24 Blackman Collegiate Academy Day at MTSU.

Zach Rachidi, 16, was with a group in Wiser-Patten Science Hall witnessing “cool” things happening in physics, led by Department of Physics and Astronomy chair Ron Henderson.

“Actually it was pretty cool and entertaining (demonstrations by Henderson), but it is not something I want to do,” said Rachidi, who expressed a strong interest in being a pilot and following an aerospace path.

Rachidi said he “learned a lot about the Honors College — the GPA requirements and the (Honors) opportunities at MTSU.”

Henderson, concrete’s Heather Brown and Nicole Green, biology chair Lynn Boyd, geosciences chair Warner Cribb and engineering technology chair Walter Boles discussed careers in their respective fields. In addition to Wiser-Patten, sessions were the new Science Building, Davis Science Building, Voorhies Engineering Technology Building

Dean John Vile and event coordinator Susan Lyons provided a complete rundown of Honors College options and requirements as they toured the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building.

Concluding their visit, Blackman students heard about “a typical day in the life of a college student” from MTSU Student Ambassadors in the Student Union Building.

After arriving on campus earlier in the day at the Student Services and Admissions Center/MT One Stop, Blackman students received True Blue Bags and heard about the admissions process from Linda Olsen, director of undergraduate recruitment, and recruiter Joey Clark.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU Department of Physics and Astronomy chair Ron Henderson explains how various heat and water processes will create steam and eventually cause the sides of aluminum can to cave in March 24 to Blackman Collegiate Academy students visiting MTSU.

MTSU Department of Physics and Astronomy chair Ron Henderson explains and then shows Blackman Collegiate Academy students how various heat and water processes create steam and eventually cause the sides of aluminum can to cave in March 24 at MTSU.

 

Music colloquium draws 2 top scholars to MTSU for free public lectures

The MTSU School of Music is sponsoring a Music Colloquium that will bring two top scholars to campus for free public presentations on Tuesday, March 28, and Thursday, April 20.

Dr. Joy H. Calico, the Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Musicology at Vanderbilt University, will speak at 1 p.m. March 28 in Room 207 of MTSU’s Saunders Fine Arts Building. Dr. Helena Simonett, senior research associate at Switzerland’s Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, will speak at 2:40 p.m. April 20 in Room 101 of the Saunders Building.

Dr. Joy Calico

Dr. Joy Calico

A searchable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap. Off-campus visitors attending the lectures should obtain a special one-day permit for each at www.mtsu.edu/parking/visit.php.

School of Music new logo webCalico will discuss her research on “Noise and Arnold Schoenberg’s 1913 Scandal Concert.” March 28. The Austrian-American composer, known for creating new musical composition methods involving atonality, conducted a concert in the Great Hall of Vienna’s Musikverein that was broken up by a melee and led to legal proceedings.

The professor said her research “analyzes the ways in which both the scandal and Schoenberg’s response to it sit at the nexus of fin-de-siecle anxieties about Central European concert life, the anti-noise movement and emerging copyright law.”

Calico is the author of two monographs, “Brecht at the Opera” and “Arnold Schoenberg’s A Survivor from Warsaw in Postwar Europe,” and she is writing a book about opera since Salome. She’s also the co-founder of the Music and Sound Studies Network of the German Studies Association and editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Musicological Society.

Dr. Helena Simonett

Dr. Helena Simonett

Simonett’s April 20 presentation, “Yoreme Cocoon Leg Rattles: An Eco-organological Study of a Unique ‘Sound Maker,’” stems from her research among the indigenous peoples of northwestern Mexico.

She received her doctorate in ethnomusicology from the University of California, Los Angeles, and has conducted extensive research on Mexican popular music and its transnational diffusion, as well as exploring the role of indigenous ceremonial music and dance in northwestern Mexico.

Simonett’s publications include “Banda: Mexican Musical Life Across Borders” and “En Sinaloa Nací: Historia de la Música de Banda,” and she edited “The Accordion in the Americas: Klezmer, Polka, Tango, Zydeco, and More!” and co-edited “A Latin American Music Reader: Views from the South.” She also produced the children’s book “Ca’anáriam — Hombre Que No Hizo Fuego” with Bernardo Esquer López in both Yoreme and Spanish with an English translation.

The MTSU Music Colloquium is a public series that presents scholarship on music and music-related issues concerning the world’s many music traditions. More details on both events are available at www.mtsu.edu/music/colloquium2017.php.

For information on MTSU School of Music events and musical performances, please visit www.mtsumusic.com or call 615-898-2493.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Siemens officials tour MTSU mechatronics, engineering facilities

Representatives from Siemens and other interested parties visited MTSU March 22, touring the Department of Engineering Technology’s mechatronics and other lab facilities as it considers building on the current partnership.

Dana Soukoup, vice president of Siemens Building Technologies Division in Chicago, Illinois, was joined by fellow Siemens officials Judith Bevels of Murfreesboro and Sara Mould of Nashville; Jimmy Davis of Murfreesboro-based The Davis Groupe; and Keith Hamilton, who retired in 2016 from Bridgestone Americas Inc. and continues to promote mechatronics engineering at all levels.

MTSU junior mechanical engineering technology major Tony Cheatham, left, discusses information about one of two lunar rover entries the Experimental Vehicles Program will have in an upcoming NASA-sponsored world competition March 22 in a Voorheis Engineering Technology building lab. Obsrving are, from left, Dana Soukoup, vice president of Siemens Building Technologies Division; Jimmy Davis of The Davis Groupe; Judith Bevels and Sara Mould of Siemens; and Keith Hamilton, a 2016 Bridgeston Americas retiree who promotes mechatronics engineering at middle school, high school, community college and university levels. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

MTSU junior mechanical engineering technology major Tony Cheatham, left, discusses one of two lunar rover entries the Experimental Vehicles Program will have in an upcoming NASA-sponsored world competition in a Voorheis Engineering Technology building lab March 22. Observing are, from left, Dana Soukoup, vice president of Siemens Building Technologies Division; Jimmy Davis of The Davis Groupe; Judith Bevels and Sara Mould of Siemens; and Keith Hamilton, a 2016 Bridgeston Americas retiree who promotes mechatronics engineering at middle school, high school, community college and university levels. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

Mechatronics engineering is a multidisciplinary field of engineering with a combination of systems in mechanical, electrical, telecommunications, control and computer engineering.

Mechatronics is based on a three-level international certification program created by Siemens, a German engineering company. To date, MTSU is the only Siemens-certified Level 3 four-year mechatronics program in the world.

Engineering Technology Chair Walter Boles led the entourage on the tour of mechatronics and engineering facilities. College of Basic and Applied Sciences Dean Bud Fischer joined them for tours of the new Science Building and just-renovated Davis Science Building.

In a hands-on lab, MTSU graduate assistant Joel Clements of Murfreesboro and junior mechanical engineering technology major Tony Cheatham of Knoxville, Tennessee, shared about the Experimental Vehicles Program in engineering technology.

The group had a business lunch with MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, interim Provost Mark Byrnes and other MTSU officials.

Later, they toured the mechatronics facility at the Tennessee College of Applied Technology in Smyrna, Tennessee, and met with state officials in Nashville.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU junior Tony Cheatham demonstrates how the Experimental Vehicles Program's lunar rover collapses for storage. Department of Engineering Technology graduate assistant Joel Clements, back left, Jimmy Davis of The Davis Groupe, Judith Bevels and Sara Mould of Siemens and Keith Hamilton, a Bridgstone Americas Inc. retiree who promotes mechatronics engineering at all levels, watch and listen March 22 at MTSU. Siemens officials, including vice president of BT Americas Dana Soukoup (not pictured), learned more about MTSU's mechatronics and engineering technology facilities.

MTSU junior Tony Cheatham demonstrates how the Experimental Vehicles Program’s lunar rover collapses for storage. Department of Engineering Technology graduate assistant Joel Clements, back left, Jimmy Davis of The Davis Groupe, Judith Bevels and Sara Mould of Siemens and Keith Hamilton, a Bridgstone Americas Inc. retiree who promotes mechatronics engineering at all levels, watch and listen March 22 at MTSU. Siemens officials, including vice president of BT Americas Dana Soukoup (not pictured), learned more about MTSU’s mechatronics and engineering technology facilities.

Jimmy Davis, left, of the Murfreesboro-based Davis Groupe, shares how his company utilizes MTSU mechatronics graduates March 22 at MTSU. Listening are, from left, Sara Mould and Judith Bevels of Siemens, MTSU Department of Engineering Technology chair Walter Boles and Dava Soukoup, vice president of Siemens Building Technologies Division. Siemens visited MTSU's mechatronics engineering and other facilities.

Jimmy Davis, left, of the Murfreesboro-based Davis Groupe, shares how his company utilizes MTSU mechatronics graduates March 22 at MTSU. Listening are, from left, Sara Mould and Judith Bevels of Siemens, MTSU Department of Engineering Technology chair Walter Boles and Dava Soukoup, vice president of Siemens Building Technologies Division. Siemens visited MTSU’s mechatronics engineering and other facilities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Laila Ali KOs MTSU with stories of losses, victories in and out of boxing ring

With a flurry of Hollywood-style lighting and audio of Muhammad Ali stating “I AM the greatest,” Laila Ali took the stage Wednesday night, March 22, as MTSU’s Black History Month and Women’s History Month keynote speaker.

Former super-middleweight boxer Laila Ali delivers the dual Black History Month and Women’s History Month keynote address at MTSU’s James Union Building March 22. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Former super-middleweight boxer Laila Ali delivers the dual Black History Month and Women’s History Month keynote address at MTSU’s James Union Building March 22. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

However, the story she told to an attentive James Union Building audience was not one of glitz and glamour but of hard lessons and harder work.

Ali, the youngest daughter of the late heavyweight boxing champion and humanitarian, spoke of the hardships created by her parents’ divorce when she was 8 years old, a stepfather she described as “mentally abusive” and hanging out with the wrong people.

She credited a three-month stint in a juvenile correctional program after a shoplifting arrest for turning her life around.

“That program really gave me the structure, the nurturing and the support that I needed and helped get me back on track,” said Ali.

Laila Ali competed as a professional boxer from 1999 to 2007, earning the female super-middleweight titles of four governing bodies of boxing and the light-heavyweight crown of the International Women’s Boxing Federation. She retired undefeated with 24 victories.

A former president of the Women’s Sports Foundation, Ali promotes equality for women in professional sports, fitness and wellness. She also is a regular panelist and contributor for “We Need to Talk,” a panel discussion program on the CBS Sports Network.

As a business entrepreneur, Ali recently debuted a signature line of hairstyling tools with Helen of Troy hair care products. Her charitable endeavors include support for Feeding America, Peace 4 Kids and the American Dental Association.

Dawn Stigall, a sophomore fashion merchandising major from Memphis, Tennessee, said she found Ali’s talk “very eye-opening.”

“I didn’t know about her going to jail … just the rough patches she went through to get to where she is today,” said Stigall. “Being a major celebrity’s daughter, I thought that she would be so privileged.”

NWHM 2017 headerAli spoke of celebrities like Michael Jackson, Prince and Stevie Wonder’s constant presence around her father, but she said he still kept his door open for visits with all kinds of people.

Married to former NFL player Curtis Conway and the mother of two children, Ali said that although she also knows celebrities, her closest girlfriends are her hair-care buddies.

“I don’t ever want to become disconnected like some people do, you know, and just be living in a bubble,” said Ali.

“Honoring Trailblazing Women in Labor and Business” is the theme of this year’s Women’s History Month observance at MTSU. In conjunction with the theme, buttons are being distributed across campus bearing the likeness of Madam C.J. Walker, the hair products magnate who was hailed as the first self-made African-American millionaire in the country in the early 20th century.

You can learn more about 2017 Women’s History Month events at MTSU here.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)


Trailblazer Laila Ali to give knockout March 22 keynote at MTSU

Trailblazing athlete and entrepreneur Laila Ali will deliver the dual keynote address for MTSU’s Women’s History Month and Black History Month celebrations.

Laila Ali

Laila Ali

Ali, a former four-time boxing world champion, will speak at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 22, in the Tennessee Room of MTSU’s James Union Building in the free public event.

A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Ali, a daughter of the late heavyweight icon and anti-war activist Muhammad Ali, competed from 1999 to 2007, earning the female super-middleweight titles of four governing bodies of boxing and the light-heavyweight crown of the International Women’s Boxing Federation. She retired undefeated with 24 victories.

A former president of the Women’s Sports Foundation, Ali promotes equality for women in professional sports, fitness and wellness. She also is a regular panelist and contributor for “We Need to Talk,” a panel discussion program on the CBS Sports Network.

NWHM 2017 headerAs a business entrepreneur, Ali recently debuted a signature line of hairstyling tools with Helen of Troy hair care products. Her charitable endeavors include support for Feeding America, Peace 4 Kids and the American Dental Association.

“Honoring Trailblazing Women in Labor and Business” is the theme of this year’s Women’s History Month observance. In conjunction with the theme, buttons are being distributed across campus bearing the likeness of Madam C.J. Walker, the hair products magnate who was hailed as the first self-made African-American millionaire in the country in the early 20th century.

You can learn more about 2017 Women’s History Month events at MTSU here.

MTSU NWHM 2017 button webMTSU’s Black History Month Committee decided to co-sponsor the university’s Women’s History Month keynote address after TV personality Terrence J. had to cancel his planned Feb. 23 Black History Month keynote talk.

Other co-sponsors of Ali’s appearance include the Distinguished Lecture Fund, the Women’s History Month Committee, the Office of Student Success, the Office of Institutional Equity and Compliance, Student Programming and Raider Entertainment, the Office of Intercultural and Diversity Affairs, the June Anderson Center for Women and Nontraditional Students, the Women’s Health Clinic at Student Health Services, the MTSU student chapter of the NAACP, the Student Government Association, the MTSU President’s Commission on the Status of Women, the College of Behavioral and Health Sciences and the Department of Health and Human Performance.

For more information, contact Barbara Scales, co-chair of the National Women’s History Month Committee, at 615-898-2193 or barbara.scales@mtsu.edu or the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at 615-898-5910.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Traditional string music’s Perlman, Taylor plan free March 27 concert at MTSU

MTSU will ring with the rhythms of traditional string music Monday, March 27, when old-time American music masters and scholars Ken Perlman and Bobby Taylor bring their talents to a free public concert.

Ken Perlman

Ken Perlman

Bobby Taylor

Bobby Taylor

Perlman, who plays the banjo, and Taylor, who plays the fiddle, will share music and stories about America’s Appalachian music traditions at the 8 p.m. event in MTSU’s State Farm Lecture Hall, Room S-102, in the Business and Aerospace Building.

MTSU’s Center for Popular Music is presenting the event. A campus map with parking notes is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

new-CPM-logo-webPerlman is a pioneer of the five-string banjo style known as “melodic clawhammer” and a master of fingerstyle guitar. He is considered one of the top clawhammer players in the world, known in particular for his adaptations of Celtic tunes to the style, and his guitar specialties include finger-picked renditions of traditional fiddle tunes.

Along with his music teaching, banjo-camp instruction, performances and recordings, Perlman is an active folklorist and author who collected tunes and oral histories for “The Fiddle Music of Prince Edward Island,” a two-CD anthology called “The Prince Edward Island Style of Fiddling,” and an ethnography, “Couldn’t Have a Wedding Without the Fiddler: the Story of Traditional Fiddling on Prince Edward Island.”

Taylor is a fourth-generation West Virginia fiddler who learned from some of that region’s legendary masters. He’s won many awards for his fiddle playing and received his home state’s highest folk life honor, the Vandalia Award, from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History.

He coordinates contests at renowned events including the Appalachian String Band Music Festival and also serves as contest judge for multiple state and national championships, teaches fiddle workshops and presents historical showcases on fiddle styles with his band, “Kanawha Tradition.”

You can get a preview of the pair’s performance below.

The Center for Popular Music, one of the nation’s largest and richest repositories of research materials related to American vernacular music, is part of MTSU’s College of Media and Entertainment. For more information on the Center for Popular Music and its projects and special events, visit www.mtsu.edu/popmusic.

This program is part of MTSU’s annual Scholars Week celebration of student research, scholarship and creative projects. For more information, visit www.mtsu.edu/scholarsweek.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Secured By miniOrange