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MTSU historians help bring ‘Tullahoma Campaign’ to life in special symposium

Two members of the MTSU community will lend their expertise to a daylong examination of one of the Civil War’s most heralded strategic maneuvers.

The Tullahoma Campaign Civil War Symposium is slated for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 25, in the Bell Buckle Banquet Hall, located at 29 Railroad Square in Bell Buckle, Tennessee.

Shirley Farris Jones

Shirley Farris Jones

Dr. Vince Armstrong

Dr. Vince Armstrong

Among the speakers will be Dr. Vince Armstrong, an adjunct history professor at MTSU, and Shirley Farris Jones, a Civil War historian and retired MTSU employee.

The “Tullahoma Campaign” was a Union endeavor between June 24 and July 3, 1863, that resulted in the removal of the Confederate Army from Middle Tennessee. Maj. Gen. William Rosecrans maneuvered his Union troops around the Rebel forces of Gen. Braxton Bragg to cut them off from supply reinforcements.

You can learn more about the strategy of the Civil War's "Tullahoma Campaign" at the MTSU Public History Program's special "Backroads Heritage" website. Click on the campaign map above to visit.

You can learn more about the strategy of the Civil War’s “Tullahoma Campaign” at the MTSU Public History Program’s special “Backroads Heritage” website. Click on the campaign map above to visit.

Rebel units made their stand at Shelbyville and Bell Buckle, while the Union forces camped at Hoover’s Gap between Manchester and Murfreesboro. Bragg and his soldiers retreated first to Tullahoma, then to Decherd and Cowan and finally to Chattanooga.

Armstrong helped develop maps for a book about the Tullahoma Campaign published by Tennessee’s Backroads Heritage. He has written several articles about the Tullahoma Campaign.

Jones has been active with the Rutherford County Historical Society, the Association for the Preservation of Tennessee Antiquities, Friends of Stones River National Battlefield and the Martha Ready Morgan Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. She is the author of six books.

Other speakers include Nashville-Davidson County Historian Carole Bucy and historian and author Thomas Cartwright. Historian and documentarian David Currey will serve as moderator.

Topics to be discussed include “The Tullahoma Campaign and its Significance,” “Migration of Troops from Stones River to Chickamauga,” “Martha Ready Morgan: From Wife to Widow in 630 Days” and “Women and Spies in the Civil War.”

The Tennessee Department of Tourist Development and Tennessee’s Backroads Heritage, a nonprofit organization, are sponsoring the symposium. The registration fee is $95, which includes breakfast, lunch, an afternoon snack and a registration packet.

For more information, call 615-613-5627 or send an email to tnbackroads@bellsouth.net.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

‘MTSU On the Record’ examines Scholars Week dedication to learning

The next “MTSU On the Record” radio program will preview Scholars Week, the university’s annual tribute to academic rigor and critical thinking skills.

Nick Carr

Nick Carr

Dr. Susan Myers-Shirk

Dr. Susan Myers-Shirk

Scholars Week web bannerHost Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Susan Myers-Shirk, interim chair of the Department of History and member of the Scholars Week Committee, will air from 9:30 to 10 p.m. Tuesday, March 21, and from 6 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, March 26, on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org.

Scheduled for March 27-31, Scholars Week enables both undergraduate and graduate students to display their research at various locations around campus with one day set aside for each university college.

Nick Carr, author of “The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains,” will deliver the Scholars Week keynote address at 7 p.m. Monday, March 27, in the Student Union Ballroom, followed by a book-signing opportunity. The event is free and open to the public.

“He looks at the way the technologies of reading and writing have changed over time, and then he links that to ideas about neuroplasticity,” Myers-Shirk said of Carr. “He describes the way in which our thinking and reading changed as our tools changed.”

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

MTSU Women’s History Month celebrates trailblazers [+VIDEO]

Science, entrepreneurship, academia and gender identity are among the topics to be explored in MTSU’s 2017 celebration of National Women’s History Month.

“Honoring Trailblazing Women in Labor and Business” is the theme of this year’s observance. In conjunction with the theme, buttons will be distributed across campus bearing the likeness of Madam C.J. Walker, the hair products magnate who was hailed as the first self-made African-American millionaire in the country in the early 20th century.

Walker’s great-great-granddaughter, author and journalist A’Lelia Bundles, delivered an address at the official opening ceremony at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, March 15, in the Keathley University Center Theater.

Bundles, who has written biographies of Madam C.J. Walker, is a former producer for NBC News and a former producer and executive for ABC News. She maintains the Madam Walker Family Archives and serves as a consultant and historical adviser for Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Culture, a line of hair care products developed by Sunline Brands.

During the March 15 ceremony, six women received awards from the MTSU National Women’s History Month Committee for their trailblazing work. They were:

  • Dr. Gloria Bonner, recently retired assistant to the president in MTSU’s Office of University Community Relations and a former dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Science.
  • Dr. Heather Brown, director of MTSU’s Concrete Industry Management Program.
  • Nancy James, director of MTSU’s Child Care Lab.
  • Dr. Karen Petersen, interim dean of the MTSU College of Liberal Arts.
  • Mary Esther Reed, mayor of Smyrna and an MTSU alumna.
  • MTSU alumna Agnes Porter, who was honored as a Future Trailblazer.

Porter’s mother, Ikeko Bass, accepted the award on her behalf. Porter is a government affairs specialist with Chambliss, Bahner and Stophel P.C. in Chattanooga, Tennessee. She graduated from MTSU in 2016 with bachelor’s degrees in political science and mass communication.

Another pioneering woman, chemist Dorothy Phillips, shared her story in a question-and-answer session with students and in a public address March 1 in the Tom H. Jackson Building.

Phillips, the first African-American woman to earn a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Vanderbilt University, was reelected to the board of the American Chemical Society in 2016.

Dr. Dorothy Phillips

Dr. Dorothy Phillips

Women interested in science will be able to quiz professionals in various technology fields at the “Women-Powered Tech Roundtable Discussion” from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, March 17, in the Tom H. Jackson Building. The event is hosted by Nashville Geek Girl Dinners, a group that encourages women in the information technology industry.

The biennial Women and Gender Studies Conference, with the theme of “Creating Global Change,” will unite scholars from around the world on the second floor of the Student Union Wednesday, March 22, through Saturday, March 25.

Through workshops, art, poetry, dance, film, invited speakers, panel discussions and the presentation of academic research, the interdisciplinary gathering will shed light on numerous issues. For more information or to register, visit www.mtsu.edu/womenstu/conference.

MTSU NWHM 2017 button webThe Academy Award-nominated film “Hidden Figures” was shown March 13-15 in the Keathley University Center Theater.

The movie is based on the true story of three African-American women mathematicians whose work made astronaut John Glenn’s 1962 history-making orbit of the earth possible. Check for show times at www.mtsu.edu/events/films.php.

All events, including the Women and Gender Studies Conference, are free and open to the public. For more information, contact Barbara Scales, co-chair of the National Women’s History Month Committee, at 615-898-2193 or barbara.scales@mtsu.edu or the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at 615-898-5910.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu

Click on the poster to see a larger PDF version.

Click on the poster to see a larger PDF version.

Professor has advice to help STEM majors succeed on ‘MTSU On the Record’

Helping majors in science, technology, engineering and mathematics was the focus of a recent “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. Ginger Holmes Rowell

Dr. Ginger H. Rowell

WMOT-new web logoHost Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Ginger Holmes Rowell, a professor of mathematical sciences, first aired March 14 on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org. You can listen to their conversation below.

Rowell and mathematical sciences lecturer Ameneh Mahrou Kassaee administered questionnaires to MTSU freshman STEM majors to determine their motivation for pursuing an education in those disciplines.

They discovered that, while the students had high grade and career motivation, they might not have enough intrinsic motivation, self-efficacy and self-determination to ensure their success.

“Perhaps they don’t know as much about the field as they might think,” said Rowell. “Once they get to college, they may find that it’s different than it was in high school.

Ameneh Mahrou Kassaee

Ameneh M. Kassaee

OTR Rowell STEM cover web“For example, in mathematics, sometimes they think it’s just solving problems. But once you start to do mathematics research, it’s at a whole different level of involvement and engagement.”

Rowell and Kassaee’s research paper, “Motivationally-Informed Interventions for At-Risk STEM Students,” was published in the July-September 2016 edition of the “Journal of STEM Education.” You can read the PDF here.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

Harrington named accounting chair in MTSU’s Jones College of Business

MTSU professor Jeannie Harrington has been named chair of the Department of Accounting in the Jennings A. Jones College of Business, Dean David Urban announced.

A member of the MTSU faculty since 1988, Harrington has taught several different courses during her tenure, currently teaching Cost Accounting at all levels and International Accounting in the Study Abroad program.

Dr. David Urban

Dr. David Urban

Dr. Jeannie Harrington

Dr. Jeannie Harrington

“I am extremely pleased that Dr. Harrington is taking on this position of leadership in our Department of Accounting. Our Accounting program is one of only 185 programs in the world holding separate accounting accreditation from AACSB International, the world’s most prestigious accrediting body for business and accounting programs,” Urban said.

“Dr. Harrington’s long history of supporting our students, our alumni, and the accounting profession provides her with an excellent foundation from which she can propel our program to an even higher level of recognition.”

Harrington received her bachelor’s degree from Murray State University, her M.B.A. from MTSU, and her doctorate from the University of Kentucky. Prior to joining academia, Harrington worked for Puryear, Hamilton, Hausman, and Wood in Nashville, Tennessee.

“It is a great honor to serve as chair. The outstanding quality and dedication of the faculty, students and alumni make my job very rewarding,” Harrington said. “I continue to believe accounting is the best business major with unlimited opportunities and career paths.”

Harrington is the faculty adviser for the Student Institute of Management Accountants IMA and also serves on the Nashville IMA Board.

She can be reached at Jeannie.Harrington@mtsu.edu. For more information about the Department of Accounting, visit www.mtsu.edu/accounting.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

‘Fermentation on the Rise’: Listen to Feb. 28 ‘MTSU On the Record’

Producer/Host: Gina Logue
Guest: Dr. Tony Johnston

Synopsis: The professor from the School of Agribusiness and Agriscience explains the new fermentation science major at MTSU.

‘MTSU On the Record’ checks what’s brewing in fermentation science major

A recent “MTSU On the Record” radio program examined a process that is used to make everything from beer to bread.

Dr. Tony Johnston

Dr. Tony Johnston

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Tony Johnston, a professor in the School of Agribusiness and Agriscience, first aired Feb. 28 on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org. You can listen to their conversation below.

Johnston wrote the proposal for MTSU’s new fermentation science major, the first degree program of its type in Tennessee.

WMOT-new web logoIn food processing, fermentation is the process by which carbohydrates are converted either to alcohol or organic acids through the use of microorganisms. Foods and drinks processed in this manner include sauerkraut, yogurt, beer, wine, bread and some types of meats.

Beginning in fall 2017, MTSU will teach courses in fermentation science in partnership with local companies, and hands-on training sessions at industry sites, as well as internships, will be scheduled to accommodate both working professionals and traditional students.

“There are literally hundreds of potential jobs out there — not just in the state of Tennessee, not just in Middle Tennessee, but literally worldwide,” said Johnston. “This is the biggest selling point, to me, about this degree program.”

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

MTSU salutes local company, retiring Army officer at ceremony

Ronnie and Donna Barrett knew they were attending a retirement ceremony on the MTSU campus Friday, Feb. 24. Little did they know they would be sharing center stage momentarily with the honoree.

The Barretts, owners of Christiana, Tennessee-based Barrett Firearms Manufacturing, received a framed certificate from Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives at MTSU, for the company’s “hiring veterans and allowing them to continue to serve” after retiring from the military, Huber said.

Barrett Firearms Manufacturing received the first framed certificate of appreciation from MTSU and the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center for hiring veterans to work for the company. Shown following the Feb. 24 presentation in the KUC Theater are Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives; Barrett co-founder Ronnie Barrett and his wife, Donna; and Hilary and Joel Miller. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

Barrett Firearms Manufacturing received the first framed certificate of appreciation from MTSU and the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center for hiring veterans to work for the company. Shown during the Feb. 24 presentation in the KUC Theater are Keith M. Huber, left, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives; Barrett co-founder Ronnie Barrett and his wife, Donna; and Hilary and Joel Miller. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

The framed certificate idea originated with Huber and Hilary Miller, director of the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center. The Barretts received the first framed certificate. Huber and Miller plan to recognize other businesses and individuals in the future.

“We are pleased to be recognized for the Veterans Transitioning Home (and Daniels Center),” Ronnie Barrett said after the 45-minute program ended. “It is always a good idea to hire a veteran. We have done well in hiring veterans in the 35 years we have been in business.”

Donna Barrett is an MTSU alumna and former state representative.

Keeping the tradition of hiring veterans flourishing, Barrett Firearms named Joel Miller director of military sales in early January.

Miller officially retires Feb. 28 as a U.S. Army lieutenant colonel. Friday, a formal ceremony was held to mark his pending retirement in the MTSU Keathley University Center Theater, followed by a reception in the Daniels Center. Huber, a retired U.S. Army lieutenant general, was the presiding officer.

Miller is a former chair of the MTSU Department of Military Science. This fall, he completed his final military obligation as a history department faculty member at the U.S. Military Academy, his alma mater, in West Point, New York.

His wife, Dr. Hilary Miller, a longtime MTSU employee and former manager for recruitment and resources for the university’s College of Liberal Arts, is director of the Daniels Center.

The Millers received awards during the ceremony.

Former U.S. Army Capt. Shane Smith was master of ceremonies. He is acting employer search agent for the new Daniels Center’s Veterans Transitioning Home Office on the third floor of the KUC.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Keith M. Huber, left, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives, retiring U.S. Army Lt. Col. Joel Miller and his wife, Hilary, admire the certificate of retirement Huber presented to Joel Miller Feb. 24 in the KUC Theater.

Keith M. Huber, left, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives, retiring U.S. Army Lt. Col. Joel Miller and his wife, Hilary, admire the certificate of retirement Huber presented to Joel Miller Feb. 24 in the KUC Theater.

Retiring U.S. Army Lt. Col. Joel Miller, center, is greeted by well-wishers attending a reception in the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center Feb. 24.

Retiring U.S. Army Lt. Col. Joel Miller, center, is greeted by well-wishers attending a reception in the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center Feb. 24.

MTSU Center for Historic Preservation documents FFA’s Tennessee legacy

Another chapter in Tennessee’s agricultural history has been written with help from MTSU’s Center for Historic Preservation.

Representatives from the center and from Tennessee Future Farmers of America presented copies of “Tennessee FFA: Tradition and Transformation” to Gov. Bill Haslam and the General Assembly Wednesday, Feb. 22, at the War Memorial Auditorium in Nashville.

Dr. Carroll Van West

Dr. Carroll Van West

Dr. Carroll Van West, center director and Tennessee State Historian, co-wrote “Tradition and Transformation” with Savannah Grandey, an MTSU alumna from Woodbury, Tennessee, in partnership with the Tennessee FFA and its foundation to highlight the leadership and achievement of thousands of alumni who wear the FFA blue jacket.

“Generations of FFA leaders have shaped our economy, our government and the very landscape we share as Tennesseans,” said West.

CHP-TN FFA history cover-webThe ceremony was part of the celebration of the national Future Farmers of America Week and the 100th anniversary of the Smith-Hughes Act, the 1917 federal law that established agricultural vocational training and spurred the 1928 development of FFA.

After the presentation of West and Grandey’s work, legislators presented a state proclamation honoring the Smith-Hughes Act centennial.

“Many Tennesseans have participated in the FFA, each with a unique story of how the organization shaped them into who they became as adults,” said Mark McBride, chairman of the Tennessee FFA Historic Preservation Committee.

“Dr. West and Savannah Grandey did a fantastic job researching our records to complete this history, all with the desire to help us convey the importance of the FFA to agriculture in Tennessee.”

McBride, Steven Gass, Chelsea Rose and John Mayfield lent their support to the project.

To purchase a copy of “Tennessee FFA: Tradition and Transformation,” contact the Tennessee FFA at 615-253-5207 or the Tennessee FFA Foundation at 931-372-6050. For more information, contact the MTSU Center for Historic Preservation, call 615-898-2947 or visit www.mtsuhistpres.org.

— Gina Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Pleas Award winner Turnage hailed as ‘perfect faculty member’ [+VIDEO]

The 21st recipient of MTSU’s highest honor for black faculty is being praised as a credit to her profession and a caring mentor to future members of her profession.

Dr. Barbara Turnage, a professor of social work, was presented with the John Pleas Faculty Award at a ceremony Tuesday, Feb. 21, in the Hazlewood Dining Room of MTSU’s James Union Building.

The award is presented annually during Black History Month to a black faculty member who has demonstrated excellence in teaching, research and service.

“The award is not about me,” Dr. John Pleas, the retired psychology professor for whom the honor is named, said to Turnage. “It’s about you. It’s about all these individuals who are named on the back of the program that have made contributions to the university.”

As a roomful of colleagues and admirers looked on, Turnage was hailed by her colleagues for her research, teaching and community service. Social work professor John Sanborn called her “fantastically collegial.”

A native of Omaha, Nebraska, Turnage has built a social work career that has included providing social services for those with impaired and/or aging parents, new mothers and families with physical and mental health needs.

She also has counseled methadone clients and individuals who were at risk of harming themselves or others. This practical experience has informed her teaching, mentoring and research.

“Her communication abilities are quite amazing, and her bubbly personality is nothing short of infectious,” said Justin Bucchio, an associate professor of social work.

In addition to her academic achievements, Turnage is vice chair of the Board of Directors for Journeys in Community Living, a program that supports adults with intellectual disabilities. She will assume the chair in fall 2017.

“Dr. Turnage exemplifies a passion for helping social work students become self-driven, knowledgeable practitioners,” said Laura R. James, a master’s degree candidate in social work from Murfreesboro. “She cares about our academic performance and supports field opportunities commensurate with our career interests.”

MTSU social work professor Barbara Turnage thanks her family, colleagues and supporters after receiving the 2017 John Pleas Faculty Award at a Feb. 21 ceremony in the James Union Building. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU social work professor Barbara Turnage thanks her family, colleagues and supporters after receiving the 2017 John Pleas Faculty Award at a Feb. 21 ceremony in the James Union Building. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

At MTSU, Turnage has served on MTSU’s Faculty Senate, the Forrest Hall Review Committee, the Africana Studies Program Development Committee and the International Education and Exchange Committee. She continues to serve on multiple faculty, search, admissions and qualifying exam committees.

In accepting the award, Turnage called her family and colleagues to the podium to share the moment with her.

“Everything we do is based on our foundation, based on people that support us,” said Turnage. “I just wanted you to know my support system. These are people that I know love me no matter what, no matter what I do or say. … I can’t thank them enough for loving me.”

“From the college perspective, you’re the perfect faculty member,” said Dr. Harold Whiteside, dean of the College of Behavioral and Health Sciences.

For more information about the John Pleas Faculty Award, go to www.mtsu.edu/aahm/john-pleas-award.php.

Previous winners of the Pleas Faculty Recognition Award since its inception are:

  • Dr. Bichaka Fayissa, economics professor, 1998.
  • Dr. Laura Jarmon, English professor, 1999.
  • Dr. Gloria Bonner, dean of the College of Education, 2000.
  • Dr. Sharon Shaw-McEwen, social work professor, 2001.
  • Dr. Alphonse Carter, engineering technology professor, 2002.
  • Dr. Bertha Clark, professor of communication disorders, 2003.
  • Dr. Anantha Babbili, 2004, dean of the College of Mass Communication.
  • Dr. Pat Patterson, professor of chemistry, 2005.
  • Dr. Rosemary Owens, dean of continuing studies and public service, 2006.
  • Dr. Connie Wade, chair of the Department of Elementary and Special Education, 2007.
  • Dr. Marva Lucas, chair of the Department of University Studies, 2008.
  • Dr. Adonijah Bakari, history professor, 2009.
  • Dr. Dwight Patterson, 2010, chemistry professor.
  • Dr. Raphael Bundage, 2011, music professor.
  • Dr. Cheryl Slaughter Ellis, professor of community and public health, 2012.
  • Dr. Newtona “Tina” Johnson, professor of English and director of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program, 2013.
  • Dr. Sekou Franklin, political science professor, 2014.
  • Dr. Michaele Chappell, professor of mathematics education and coordinator for the Masters of Science in Teaching program, 2015.
  • Dr. Linda Clark, professor of mathematics in the Department of University Studies, 2016.

— Gina Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU social work professor Barbara Turnage, left, receives the 2017 John Pleas Faculty Award from Professor Emeritus John Pleas at a Feb. 21 ceremony in the James Union Building. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU social work professor Barbara Turnage, left, receives the 2017 John Pleas Faculty Award from Professor Emeritus John Pleas at a Feb. 21 ceremony in the James Union Building.

Dr. John Pleas, emeritus professor of psychology, gives remarks Tuesday, Feb. 21, before presenting the 2017 John Pleas Faculty Award to Dr. Barbara F. Turnage, professor in the Department of Social Work. The ceremony was held in the Hazlewood Dining Room of the James Union Building. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

Dr. John Pleas, emeritus professor of psychology, speaks Tuesday, Feb. 21, before presenting the 2017 John Pleas Faculty Award to Dr. Barbara F. Turnage, professor in the Department of Social Work.


Social work professor to receive MTSU top minority faculty honor Feb. 21

Feb. 15, 2017

An MTSU professor whose dedication to others has been the hallmark of her career is the 2017 John Pleas Faculty Recognition Award honoree.

Dr. Barbara Turnage

Dr. Barbara Turnage

Social work professor Barbara Turnage will receive the award in a 4 p.m. ceremony Tuesday, Feb. 21, in the Hazlewood Dining Room of the James Union Building.

The ceremony is free and open to the public. A campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap. Off-campus visitors attending the ceremony should obtain a special one-day permit from MTSU’s Office of Parking and Transportation at www.mtsu.edu/parking/visit.php.

MTSU presents the John Pleas Faculty Award each year during Black History Month to a minority faculty member who has demonstrated excellence in teaching, research and service. The honor, established in 1997, is named for Dr. John Pleas, an MTSU professor emeritus of psychology.

Turnage, a native of Omaha, Nebraska, has built a social work career that has included providing social services for families with impaired and/or aging parents, new mothers and families with physical and mental health needs.

She also has counseled methadone clients and individuals who were at risk of harming themselves or others. This practical experience has informed her teaching, mentoring and research.

Dr John Pleas web

Dr. John Pleas

At MTSU, Turnage has served on MTSU’s Faculty Senate, the Forrest Hall Review Committee, the Africana Studies Program Development Committee and the International Education and Exchange Committee. She continues to serve on multiple faculty, search, admissions and qualifying exam committees.

Click on the poster to see a larger PDF version.

Click on the 2017 poster to see a larger PDF version.

In addition to her academic achievements, Turnage serves as vice chair of the board of directors for Murfreesboro’s Journeys in Community Living, a program formerly known as the Rutherford Adult Activity Center that supports adults with intellectual disabilities. She will assume the board’s chair in fall 2017.

Turnage, a first-generation high school graduate, earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in social work from the University of Nebraska at Omaha. She earned her doctorate in social work from Tulane University and earned a four-year regents’ fellowship there.

Pleas Award nominees must have completed at least five years of service at MTSU and have a record of outstanding service. Each nominee must have three letters to support his or her nomination.

For more information about the John Pleas Faculty Recognition Award at MTSU, contact Dr. Linda Clark, professor of mathematics in the Department of University Studies and the 2016 Pleas Award winner, at 615-904-8234 or linda.clark@mtsu.edu.

Along with Clark, previous winners of the Pleas Faculty Recognition Award since its inception are:

  • Dr. Bichaka Fayissa, economics professor, 1998.
  • Dr. Laura Jarmon, English professor, 1999.
  • Dr. Gloria Bonner, dean of the College of Education, 2000.
  • Dr. Sharon Shaw-McEwen, social work professor, 2001.
  • Dr. Alphonse Carter, engineering technology professor, 2002.
  • Dr. Bertha Clark, professor of communication disorders, 2003.
  • Dr. Anantha Babbili, 2004, dean of the College of Mass Communication.
  • Dr. Pat Patterson, professor of chemistry, 2005.
  • Dr. Rosemary Owens, dean of continuing studies and public service, 2006.
  • Dr. Connie Wade, chair of the Department of Elementary and Special Education, 2007.
  • Dr. Marva Lucas, chair of the Department of University Studies, 2008.
  • Dr. Adonijah Bakari, history professor, 2009.
  • Dr. Dwight Patterson, 2010, chemistry professor.
  • Dr. Raphael Bundage, 2011, music professor.
  • Dr. Cheryl Slaughter Ellis, professor of community and public health, 2012.
  • Dr. Newtona “Tina” Johnson, professor of English and director of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program, 2013.
  • Dr. Sekou Franklin, political science professor, 2014.
  • Dr. Michaele Chappell, professor of mathematics education and coordinator for the Masters of Science in Teaching program, 2015.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

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