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Scholarship deadline is March 9 for student leaders event

MTSU could send a representative to the National Conference for College Women Student Leaders.

The conference is slated for May 28-30 at the University of Maryland, College Park, and is designed to enhance the leadership skills of college women students and to promote effectiveness in their work on campus and in the community.

AAUW graphic croppedThe deadline for Tennessee colleges and universities and Tennessee branches of the American Association of University Women to nominate students for the conference scholarship is Monday, March 9. Nominees must submit applications by Friday, March 13.

Naomi Plant-Moran, an MTSU senior anthropology major from Murfreesboro, attended last year’s conference. This year, she is president of the MTSU student chapter of AAUW.

“I had never heard of NCCWSL before my involvement with AAUW, and, as a single mother of two children, struggling through my undergraduate degree and battling poverty every day, the idea that I would ever get to do something like attending the national conference was like a dream,” Plant-Moran said.

The 2014 gathering attracted more than 500 young women from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam and Jamaica. Plant-Moran said Chelsea Clinton, daughter of former President Bill Clinton and former U.S. Sen. and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, was the keynote speaker.

“I never knew women could be so kind to each other or raise such a feeling of love in a room, and the AAUW scholarship made it possible for me to be able to attend the conference and get to have that experience,” Plant-Moran said. “I will treasure it for my entire life.”

The scholarship will cover conference registration, lodging and meals. Universities and AAUW branches are expected to contribute to travel funds.

For more information about the the National Conference for College Women Student Leaders, visit www.nccwsl.org.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Local school’s history springs to life with help from MTSU students

MTSU students are seeking assistance from Murfreesboro and Rutherford County residents in preserving the history of what is now Central Magnet School.

Central Magnet School is shown from the front lawn looking northwest in a 2014 photo provided by Ethan Morris.

Central Magnet School is shown from the front lawn looking northwest in a 2014 photo provided by Ethan Morris.

“This is really a community project, and so we want as much of their support and activity as we can get,” said Casey Gymrek, a master’s degree candidate from Cape Coral, Florida, and student in Dr. Brenden Martin’s “Essentials of Museum Management” class.

An interpretive exhibit will be placed in the magnet school’s “College Corner” in the western side of the building. MTSU students also will create a website where audio, video and still images will be posted.

Dr. Brendan Martin

Dr. Brendan Martin

Martin, an MTSU professor of history, is guiding the students as they interview teachers and alumni, seek donations of artifacts and peruse documents and photos from the campus’s nearly 175-year history.

“We’re also doing a cultural landscape study, where we’re not just looking at the physical campus but also taking a look at the adjacent neighborhood,” Martin said.

Union University was established on the current magnet school’s site on East Main Street before the Civil War.

It was torn down in the early 1900s and replaced with the Tennessee College for Women, which existed until 1946. Both schools were affiliated with the Baptist church.

When the original Central High School on Maple Street burned down in 1944, it was rebuilt on the site of the defunct women’s college. Construction was completed in 1950.

Union University is shown on the site of what is now Central Magnet School in an undated photo. The facility opened in 1848, was badly damaged during the Civil War and reopened in 1868, then closed in 1878 after a cholera epidemic. The building to the far right is the home of Joseph Eaton, the first president of Union University, who died in 1859. (photo courtesy of the Albert Gore Research Center)

Union University is shown on the site of what is now Central Magnet School in an undated photo. The facility opened in 1848, was badly damaged during the Civil War and reopened in 1868, then closed in 1878 after a cholera epidemic. The building to the far right is the home of Joseph Eaton, the first president of Union University, who died in 1859. (photo courtesy of the Albert Gore Research Center)

The high school’s integration, which began in 1965 and was finished in 1968, is one of the major historical components of the MTSU students’ research.

The building was no longer large enough for the student body after integration, so Rutherford County built two new high schools — Riverdale and Oakland — in Murfreesboro to accommodate enrollment for city residents.

Central was converted to a middle school in 1973 and designated a magnet school in 2010.

“We’re trying to reach out to as many area institutions as possible,” said Ethan Morris, a master’s degree candidate from Louisville, Kentucky, and director of the Central project.

This post card features a drawing of Murfreesboro's Central High School in its Maple Street location from 1919 to 1944. The building was destroyed by fire in 1944, and Central High moved to the old Tennessee College for Women buildings on East Main Street, where it expanded and has remained since.

This post card features a drawing of Murfreesboro’s Central High School in its Maple Street location from 1919 to 1944. The building was destroyed by fire in 1944, and Central High moved to the old Tennessee College for Women buildings on East Main Street, where it expanded and has remained since.

Those community institutions include Shacklett’s Photography, which recently donated a collection to the county archives, and the Southern Baptist Convention archives in Nashville.

MTSU’s own Albert Gore Research Center will be the repository for many of the artifacts.

“The students will walk away with two or three … work products that testify to their professional abilities,” said Martin.

Both the professor and Gymrek noted, however, that the people connected with the school in any of its incarnations are the heart and soul of the project.

This page from the 1969 edition of the Central High School yearbook, "Postscript," shows 15 of the members of the senior class.

This page from the 1969 edition of the Central High School yearbook, “Postscript,” shows 15 of the members of the senior class.

“We have nearly 25 years of Central High School alumni, many of whom have gone on to become very important leaders in the business community and politics in the town,” Martin said.

“They’re the ones who have all the objects and all the stories and all the memories that we really want to share with everyone,” Gymrek added.

The students expect to complete their work in May, but gathering information and artifacts as early as possible is essential.

“Typically, for an institution, a project like this might take a year to two years,” said Gymrek, “but we’re trying to get it done in four months.”

To contribute artifacts and anecdotes or to be interviewed about memories of Central Magnet School and its predecessors, contact Martin at 615-898-2643 or brenden.martin@mtsu.edu or Gymrek at cgymrek@gmail.com.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU researchers await Feb. 24 Scholars Week abstract deadline

MTSU students and their faculty mentors who are preparing for the ninth annual Scholars Week 2015 must submit their abstract proposals by 11:59 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 24, said Andrienne Friedli, assistant vice president for research.

Abstracts should be submitted online through http://www.mtsu.edu/research/scholarsWeek/index.php. Each online abstract submission will include a project title and 150- to 300-word summary of the research project. Only abstract submissions with undergraduate and graduate students as first authors will be eligible for judging and prizes.

In this 2014 file photo, Chanelle Despins, left, helps senior James Rucker set up a camera to photograph a hard drive as part of her poster display "Macro Photography" during the Scholars Week Poster Exposition March 21 in the Student Union Ballroom. (MTSU Photos by Andy Heidt)

In this 2014 file photo, Chanelle Despins, left, helps senior James Rucker set up a camera to photograph a hard drive as part of her poster display “Macro Photography” during the Scholars Week Poster and Performance Exposition March 21 in the Student Union Ballroom. (MTSU Photos by Andy Heidt)

Applicants will be notified about acceptance decisions by March 2.

Scholars Week will be held March 16-20 following spring break. Events will include department and college activities in discipline-specific venues for presentation of graduate, undergraduate and faculty scholarship.

Planned activities will include talks, readings, performances, posters and multimedia presentations, Friedli said.

The celebration of Scholars Week will culminate in a universitywide showcase of posters, multimedia and performances from 12:40 to 2:45 p.m. Friday, March 20, in the Student Union Ballroom. A group of judges will select the winners from each of the colleges within the university.

The Scholars Week Committee includes representatives from all of the colleges within MTSU. They help arrange the college Scholars Days during the week.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

In this 2014 file photo, Logan Smith, center, talks with a group about his findings detailed on his poster during the university wide Scholars Week Poster and Performance Exposition.

In this 2014 file photo, Logan Smith, center, talks with a group about his findings detailed on his poster during the university wide Scholars Week Poster and Performance Exposition.

MTSU unveils bachelor’s degree in unmanned aircraft operations

Unmanned aircraft systems or UAS are creating thousands of new jobs in many industries and proving to be a major fixture in the future of aviation worldwide.

That’s why MTSU students who earn a bachelor’s degree in the Department of Aerospace’s new UAS Operations concentration will be a part of a rising business sector expected to bring 70,000 new jobs, starting salaries of $50,000 or higher and contribute $13.6 billion to the U.S. economy in the next three to five years.

Doug Campbell, operations manager for MTSU aerospace department's Unmanned Aircraft Systems, uses remote control to make the 3D Robotics X-8 aircraft take off while performing research at the Argentina agricultural institute near Mendoz during winter break. Following TBR approval, UAS Operations now is available as a bachelor's degree.  (Photos by Federico Garcia)

Doug Campbell, operations manager for MTSU aerospace department’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems, uses remote control to make the 3D Robotics X-8 aircraft take off while performing research at the Argentina agricultural institute near Mendoz during winter break. Following TBR approval, UAS Operations now is available as a bachelor’s degree. (Photos by Federico Garcia)

UAS Operations will prepare students to fly unmanned aircraft (also called drones), program the aircraft and build and modify aircraft to their unique needs. This will allow graduating students to set their own course in multitude of industries and other disciplines, said Doug Campbell, UAS Operations manager.

The UAS Operations concentration, which is fully available this semester, will prepare students to find one of those jobs in desired industries from agriculture, public safety, photography, media, disaster response/management, power industry, defense department positions and an endless list of others, Campbell said.

“We are elated to add another concentration to our curriculum,” said aerospace Chair Ron Ferrara. “Unmanned aircraft are a major part of the future of aviation. We strive to stay on the cutting edge of technology and safety in our programs. This significant shift in the aviation industry will have profound positive effects and we are paving the way for students to enter this lucrative career field.”

Aerospace logoThe concentration received Tennessee Board of Regents approval late last year and is the first of its kind in the state. Students must talk to their adviser before adding UAS Operations as their major concentration online, Campbell said.

The UAS degree is one of only a handful in the U.S. It includes hands-on courses on building and flying unmanned aircraft systems, manned pilot training (earning a private pilot license), core aerospace courses and participation with industry partners.

Unmanned aircraft courses, originally offered as electives while the complete concentration was being built last year, have been taught since spring 2014, Campbell said. They are offered every semester.

“As the national airspace system is reshaped through unmanned aircraft and new technologies, MTSU students will be able to lead the way and find lucrative positions in the workforce,” Ferrara said. “This is a chance for our graduates to work in multiple industries and bring the advances and benefits of aviation (and unmanned aircraft) to those previously not reached.”

MTSU junior agriscience major Aubrey Bloom of Nashville performs a preflight inspection of the 3D Robotics X-8 unmanned aircraft during research while on winter break in Argentina with other students and faculty. Aerospace students can now pursue a bachelor's degree in UAS Operations. (Photos by Federico Garcia)

MTSU junior agriscience major Aubrey Bloom of Nashville performs a preflight inspection of the 3D Robotics X-8 unmanned aircraft during research while on winter break in Argentina with other students and faculty. Aerospace students can now pursue a bachelor’s degree in UAS Operations. (Photos by Federico Garcia)

Students will also take an interdisciplinary, technical path through manned and unmanned courses, electricity principles, computer science, geographic information systems or GIS, agriculture, business and other programs.

The UAS Operations concentration went through multiple levels of approval at the college, university and with TBR. The work to create the degree program spanned more than a year, including participation from many faculty and staff in departments around campus.

“Students will garner from the expertise of faculty members around the university, such as computer science and engineering technology, and the input from many departments was crucial to create a strong degree program,” Campbell said.

After a thorough review and determination of the degree’s ability to create new operators, consultants, managers and leaders who will thrive in the UAS industry, the final signature was made and degree entered into the aerospace department’s offerings in December.

UAS joins concentrations in aerospace administration and technology, flight dispatch, maintenance management and professional pilot, along with the air traffic control program.

For questions about the new UAS Operations concentration, call Campbell at 615-898-5832, email Douglas.Campbell@mtsu.edu or visit him in his office in Room S212 in the Business and Aerospace Building.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

In this December 2014 file photo, the 3D Robotics X-8 unmanned aircraft climbs during takeoff at the National Institute of Agricultural Technology, or INTA, near Mendoza, Argentina, as MTSU students and faculty utilized it to collect agricultural research data. UAS Operations is now an aerospace concentration approved by the Tennessee Board of Regents late last year.

In this December 2014 file photo, the 3D Robotics X-8 unmanned aircraft climbs during takeoff at the National Institute of Agricultural Technology, or INTA, near Mendoza, Argentina, as MTSU students and faculty utilized it to collect agricultural research data. UAS Operations is now an aerospace concentration approved by the Tennessee Board of Regents late last year.

MTSU launches special Friday transfer tours to recruit students (+VIDEO)

People visited MTSU from as far away as the Atlanta, Georgia, area and Knoxville, Tennessee. Tullahoma, the Five Points community in Lawrence County, Chapel Hill, Columbia, Greenbrier and Murfreesboro were among other Tennessee hometowns for the campus guests.

Prospective students, most accompanied by parents or siblings, became the initial group to visit MTSU Friday (Feb. 13) in the first of three special Friday tours to recruit students wanting to transfer from community colleges and four-year universities.

It marks the start of a bold initiative by MTSU to recruit transfer students.

http://youtu.be/-TQx1kMq7jQ

“This is for transfer students to come in and meet other students their age and their year of study,” said Audrey Welch, transfer enrollment coordinator, who provided a 20-minute introduction utilizing PowerPoint and a video.

“We will do a campus tour with them,” Welch added. “We will do a credit evaluation. We’ll go over transfer scholarships, transfer credits, housing for transfer students, grouping them together. We will answer questions and do one-on-one interviews. We’ll talk about financial aid and about the (MT) One Stop center. We’ll do a little bit of everything.”

The MT One Stop, a one-stop shop to help meet an array of students’ enrollment management needs, is located on the second floor of the Student Services and Admissions Center, 1860 Blue Raider Drive. The transfer tours begin in Room 110 in the same building.

MTSU Blue Elite tour member David Parente leads the transfer student tour group leaving the Student Services and Admissions Center Friday (Feb. 13) during the special tour for transfers being recruited by MTSU. Parente, a senior marketing major in the Jennings A. Jones College of Business, transferred to MTSU from the Motlow State Community College campus in Smyrna, Tennessee. (MTSU photos by Andy Heidt)

MTSU Blue Elite tour member David Parente leads the transfer student tour group leaving the Student Services and Admissions Center Friday (Feb. 13) during the special tour for transfers being recruited by MTSU. Parente, a senior marketing major in the Jennings A. Jones College of Business, transferred to MTSU from the Motlow State Community College campus in Smyrna, Tennessee. (MTSU photos by Andy Heidt)

Miles White, 21, of Tullahoma, will be transferring credits he received while serving in the U.S. Army. He visited MTSU for the first time with his sister, Emily Lange, of Nashville.

Planning to study criminal justice in the College of Behavioral and Health Sciences, White said he was impressed with both the Science Building and College of Mass Communications.

Destiny Caughorn of Knoxville, a student at Pellissippi State Community, plans to study in the School of Nursing. Her plan is to transfer in spring 2016.

“I liked everything (about MTSU),” said Caughorn, who visited with her sister, Kristen. “Everything’s available. I feel like there’s lots of opportunities.”

MTSU senior marketing major David Parente of Murfreesboro led the tour. He transferred from the Motlow State Community College campus in Smyrna, Tennessee.

Future transfer-specific tours will be held starting at 9:30 a.m. Friday, March 13, and Friday, April 10.

For more information, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/schedule-a-visit/index.php or call 615-898-5670.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Destiny Caughorn, second from left, of Knoxville, Tennessee, and her sister, Kristen, receive a packet of information from MTSU Blue Elite tour coordinator Chris Hardman and Emaly Cox Friday (Feb. 13) in the first floor lobby of the Student Services and Admissions Center. Destiny Caughorn, a student at Pellissippi State Community College, plans to study nursing and start at MTSU in spring 2016.

Destiny Caughorn, second from left, of Knoxville, Tennessee, and her sister, Kristen, receive a packet of information from MTSU Blue Elite tour coordinator Chris Hardman and Emaly Cox Friday (Feb. 13) in the first floor lobby of the Student Services and Admissions Center. Destiny Caughorn, a student at Pellissippi State Community College, plans to study nursing and start at MTSU in spring 2016.

MTSU fraternities, sororities are ‘Stepping for a Cure’ Feb. 13

The fastest feet in fraternities and sororities will be “Stepping for a Cure” at MTSU Friday, Feb. 13.

The Interfraternity Council and the Panhellenic Council will sponsor a step show slated for 7 to 9:30 p.m. Feb. 13 at MTSU’s Tucker Theatre. A printable parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParking14-15.

Admission is $10 in advance or $15 from 4 to 7 p.m. at the box office on the evening of the show. Advance tickets may be purchased at www.mtsu.edu/tuckertheatre ; click on “Get Tickets” on the left side of the page.

Part of the proceeds will go to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis to combat childhood cancer.

Alpha Chi Omega, Chi Omega, Alpha Omicron Pi, Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Tau Omega and Zeta Tau Alpha will create and perform intricate choreography in competition for first, second, third and fan favorite trophies.

The audience will determine the fan favorite award.

“It’s not just for people to watch,” said Jordan Parker, a member of Phi Beta Sigma and organizer of the event. “It’s also for people to socialize and interact with one another.”

Teams of 15 to 26 people each are responsible for their own props and costumes. Lighting and audio services will be provided by Tucker Theatre in conjunction with the teams.

Parker says the teams will be judged on synchronicity, themes and how well they adhere to the 13-minute time limit. Penalties will be assessed for exceeding the time limit.

“It’s a really fun, lighthearted show,” Parker said. “Just to come and see people step is very interesting.”

For more information, contact Parker at jjp3q@mtmail.mtsu.edu or 901-651-6864.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU uses unmanned craft to study Argentina’s agriculture

Opening the door for future study abroad opportunities, MTSU aerospace and agricultural students flew unmanned aircraft in Mendoza, Argentina, while performing research during winter break.

Along with the five undergraduate students and one alumnus, MTSU faculty members Tony Johnston from the School of Agribusiness and Agriscience and Doug Campbell in the Department of Aerospace teamed up to travel to South America and learn how unmanned aircraft systems — or UAS — can be used in agriculture.

MTSU students Tori Hawkins, left, Megan Knox and Nate Tilton prepare the 3D Robotics X-8 unmanned aircraft next to the grape vineyards at Argentina’s National Institute of Agricultural Technology near Mendoza during winter break. (Photos by Federico Garcia)

MTSU students Tori Hawkins, left, Megan Knox and Nate Tilton prepare the 3D Robotics X-8 unmanned aircraft next to the grape vineyards at Argentina’s National Institute of Agricultural Technology near Mendoza during winter break. (Photos by Federico Garcia)

Using the 3D Robotics X-8 aircraft, the group studied grape and olive production in Argentina to learn how their award-winning wines and olive oils are produced. They learned the ins-and-outs of making wine and olive oil and brainstormed ideas of how information from the unmanned aircraft, commonly called drones, could help producers increase grape and olive yields and quality.

“The experience was incredibly unique compared to anything I have ever done,” said Aubrey Bloom of Nashville, a junior agriscience major who is earning a minor in aerospace’s unmanned program. “The chance to be a part of this team and the trip was once in a career. It truly reignited my want for research.”

“Argentina was an unforgettable experience that I am proud to say I was part of,” said Jessie McMillin, a senior agribusiness student from Watertown, Tennessee. “It was exciting to finally put all of the skills that I have learned at MTSU to the test. It was also a great cultural experience to see how the people of Argentina lived.”

A flight instructor at the MTSU Department of Aerospace’s Flight Operations Center at Murfreesboro Airport, Nate Tilton, 21, of Brookhaven, Mississippi, “learned a lot about the unmanned aircraft and Argentina, and had an incredible bonding experience with the team.”

MTSU students and faculty prepare the unmanned aircraft for flight at the National Institute of Agricultural Technology near Mendoza, Argentina, during winter break. The research group includes, front row (from left) Jessie McMillin, Tori Hawkins and aerospace UAS coordinator Doug Campbell; and back row (from left) School of Agribusiness and Agriscience professor Tony Johnston and senior aerospace major Nate Tilton.

MTSU students and faculty prepare the unmanned aircraft for flight at the National Institute of Agricultural Technology near Mendoza, Argentina, during winter break. The research group includes, front row (from left) Jessie McMillin, Tori Hawkins and aerospace UAS coordinator Doug Campbell; and back row (from left) School of Agribusiness and Agriscience professor Tony Johnston and senior aerospace major Nate Tilton.

After learning about current production processes, students worked at Argentina’s National Institute of Agricultural Technology, or INTA, and flew the UAS above experimental grape vineyards and vegetable fields, gathering multispectral images used to determine crop health, Campbell and Johnston said.

The first to ever fly an unmanned aircraft above the Argentina research fields, the students presented their data and accompanying analysis to the institute’s lead agricultural researchers, who were quite pleased and welcomed future student groups, the faculty members said.

The students praised the 3D Robotics X-8 aircraft, which included autopilot and GPS capability that allows autonomous flight. The eight-rotor helicopter carried both a GoPro and multispectral cameras for analyzing the crops.

“The aircraft did an exceptional job during flight,” said Bloom, who suggests the “battery life vs. payload weight needs to be worked on to increase flight time.”

“My first impressions of the X-8 aircraft was pure amazement,” McMillin said. “We did run into some initial calibration issues. Once those were worked out, everything ran smoothly. It was exciting to compare the imaging data we collected with the ground data we collected.”

The 3D Robotics X-8 unmanned aircraft climbs during takeoff at the National Institute of Agricultural Technology, or INTA, near Mendoza, Argentina, as MTSU students and faculty utilized it to collect agricultural research data.

The 3D Robotics X-8 unmanned aircraft climbs during takeoff at the National Institute of Agricultural Technology, or INTA, near Mendoza, Argentina, as MTSU students and faculty utilized it to collect agricultural research data.

Tilton said the X8 proved to be “a dependable aircraft and performed well despite the hot and dusty conditions. It performed to its specifications and allowed us to capture the information we needed to analyze crop health from the air.”

The students learned to preflight the UAS, program a complex flight plan, fly it from a ground control station, provide backup during takeoffs and landings and process the agricultural images to ultimately produce a better grape crop, said Campbell, unmanned operations manager in aerospace.

Students Tori Hawkins of Murfreesboro and Megan Knox of Nashville and alumna Amanda Williams of Denver, Colorado, also participated.

The Federal Aviation Administration mostly prohibits the commercial use of UAS in the U.S. Campbell added that hobbyists can fly unmanned aircraft as long as they follow a simple set of rules to keep everyone safe, and public entities such as MTSU can fly for research and development purposes through an FAA waiver program.

By traveling to Argentina, MTSU students were able to conduct research they may not have been able to in the U.S. because of FAA restrictions.

Aerospace and the agriculture program plan to conduct the class annually to further strengthen the leadership role MTSU is taking in the use of unmanned aircraft and digital control sensing technologies to improve agricultural output, Campbell said.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

With rows of grapevines in the background, MTSU students and faculty members are shown after a day of flying the 3D Robotics X-8 unmanned aircraft at Argentina’s National Institute of Agricultural Technology near Mendoza. The group includes (from left) Aubrey Bloom, Megan Knox, Amanda Williams, Tony Johnston, Jessie McMillin, Tori Hawkins, Doug Campbell and Nate Tilton.

With rows of grapevines in the background, MTSU students and faculty members are shown after a day of flying the 3D Robotics X-8 unmanned aircraft at Argentina’s National Institute of Agricultural Technology near Mendoza. The group includes (from left) Aubrey Bloom, Megan Knox, Amanda Williams, Tony Johnston, Jessie McMillin, Tori Hawkins, Doug Campbell and Nate Tilton.

Tech-savvy students assist AdamsPlace residents (+VIDEO)

Monthly during the MTSU academic year, University Honors College students become the apples of the AdamsPlace residents’ eyes.

That’s because the students assist the residents, who might have issues with Apple computers, laptops, iPhones and iPads, plus Kindles, Nooks and more.

The residents, all retired but busy with modern technology, appreciate the students’ help. The students, nearly all in their late teens or early 20s, enjoy solving technical issues and spending time with the older generation — and the feeling is mutual.

For the Jan. 28 resumption of the collaboration, which included cake and other treats and drinks as a way for AdamsPlace to thank the students and Honors College, more than 20 residential residents sought tech assistance from seven students in this generational swap meet.

http://youtu.be/RL3R1uYhcPs

The brainchild of Susan Lyons, event coordinator for the Honors College, the technology collaboration has been a hit and success since January 2014. Lyons rounds up the students; Betsy Bonds, activities director at AdamsPlace has no trouble finding seniors needing assistance with their phones, computers and other technology.

“It’s a great partnership,” Bonds said. “The students love the residents and the residents love the students. The residents here are relatively computer-savvy.”

AdamsPlace resident Mary K. Calkin, left, shows MTSU Honors College student Dani Dye where she is having an issue with her desktop computer. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

AdamsPlace resident Mary K. Calkin, left, shows MTSU Honors College student Dani Dye where she’s having trouble with her desktop computer. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

AdamsPlace, located at 1925 Memorial Blvd. in Murfreesboro, is a provider of residential and assisted living for older adults.

Bonds, front-desk staff member Paige Rijoff and other AdamsPlace personnel have to assist residents with technology during the weeks MTSU does not come, so they say the students’ visits “have been a relief.”

Transplanted Texans Nancy and Louis Bittrich are among the many residents receiving technical support.

“They are so kind and patient,” Nancy Bittrich said of the students. “If they don’t know, they’ll find the answer or get someone else to help.”

Dani Dye of Franklin, Tennessee, an MTSU senior exercise science major planning to graduate in August, said the most recent trip was her second time to help.

MTSU Honors College student Connor McDonald volunteers his time to assist AdamsPlace resident Marge Cashman in solving a technology issue.

MTSU Honors College student Connor McDonald volunteers his time to assist AdamsPlace resident Marge Cashman in solving a technology issue.

“It’s fun to meet all of them,” Dye said. “You know you’re really helping somebody with their technology functions. It’s really nice to do that and fun figuring out more about technology and realizing you are teaching them.”

The residents include MTSU alumna Liz Rhea and staffers Faye Brandon and Ida Read. Brandon, a former Health, Physical Education and Recreation faculty member, and Read, a catalog librarian, retired after years of service to the university.

One of the residents’ favorite go-to techies is senior Joseph Mosqueda of Crossville, Tennessee.

Honors College Dean John Vile and publications coordinator Marsha Powers joined colleague Lyons and the students on the visit.

In addition to sharing about the Honors College’s assets, Vile told residents he often seeks tech support from the college’s students.

The next scheduled technology collaboration at AdamsPlace will be Wednesday, Feb. 25.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

While MTSU’s Calla Sharp, left, works with AdamsPlace resident Nancy Grebus, fellow Honors College student Madison Tracy, second from right, discusses a technology issue with Lyla Russell recently at AdamsPlace on Memorial Boulevard.

While MTSU’s Calla Sharp, left, works with AdamsPlace resident Nancy Grebus, fellow Honors College student Madison Tracy, second from right, discusses a technology issue with Lyla Russell recently at AdamsPlace on Memorial Boulevard.

MTSU alumnus, now in NFL, headlines Feb. 7 leadership summit

MTSU students can learn how to help fill America’s leadership void at a university-sponsored summit set for Saturday, Feb. 7.

BR Leadership Summit 2015 poster webThe Blue Raider Leadership Summit, with the theme “Oh! The Places You’ll Go!”, is slated for 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Feb. 7 in the Student Union ballroom.

Organizers say this educational opportunity will help students grasp the principles and techniques of effective leadership and network with other students.

The registration fee is $15, which includes all meals and conference materials. You can register here.

Phillip Tanner

Phillip Tanner

“It will be very interactive for everyone involved,” said Jackie Victory, director of student organizations and service.

“Students attending the summit will have a mix of educational sessions and group activities.”

This year, students will be able to select specific educational tracks for women or emerging leaders.

The keynote speaker will be San Francisco 49ers running back and MTSU alumnus Phillip Tanner.

Following his collegiate football career at MTSU, Tanner signed with the Dallas Cowboys as an undrafted free agent in 2011 before eventually landing with the 49ers. His pro career also has included brief stints with the Indianapolis Colts and Buffalo Bills.

Jackie Victory

Jackie Victory

In an Aug. 21 game against the San Diego Chargers, Tanner lost his helmet on a play in which he scored a touchdown. The National Football League then enacted a new safety rule declaring that the play will be dead when a ball carrier’s helmet comes off and hits the field.

At the leadership summit, Tanner “will speak with our students about staying motivated when life gives you curve balls,” Victory said.

The Blue Raider Leadership Summit is sponsored by the Office of Leadership and Service and co-sponsored by the Intercultural and Diversity Affairs Center, the June Anderson Center for Women and Nontraditional Students and Fraternity and Sorority Life.

For more information, call the Center for Student Involvement and Leadership at 615-898-5812, or email Victory at jackie.victory@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU people, programs, technology make impact on prospective students

Zac Miller, Jacob Rex and others were impressed by the MTSU College of Mass Communication’s facilities and technology during the True Blue Experience Day Jan. 30 on campus.

Strong impressions made by veteran College of Education faculty members on Allison Carbaugh may have applied the finishing touches to recruiting the Farragut, Tennessee, resident to the Murfreesboro university.

MTSU College of Mass Communication director of technical systems Marc Parrish leads a tour group of prospective students and their parents through the $1.8 million mobile production lab during the True Blue Experience Day Friday (Jan. 30) at MTSU. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

MTSU College of Mass Communication director of technical systems Marc Parrish leads a tour group of prospective students and their parents through the $1.8 million mobile production lab during the True Blue Experience Day Jan. 30 at MTSU. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

And Friendship Christian School senior Evan Hemontolor had high praise for the Jones College of Business and its new Dale Carnegie program to build people skills.

More than 60 prospective students and nearly 90 people altogether attended the final True Blue Experience Day for the 2014-15 academic year, giving high school students and their parents an opportunity for a more in-depth campus visit.

The potential students met deans, faculty members, advisers and other academic personnel; they talked to admissions and financial aid personnel; they visited classes and laboratories (including Mass Comm’s impressive $1.8 million mobile production truck); some took a campus tour; and they gained a hint of university life.

Rex, who is from Baneberry, Tennessee, in Jefferson County, and Miller, who is from Greeneville, Tennessee, were first in their group to sit in the two anchor chairs in Mass Comm’s Center for Innovation in Media’s “green room,” where MTSU students learn the ropes of broadcast news for student-run television station MT10.

Rex, who already works part-time for the Standard-Banner weekly newspaper in Jefferson City, said he has been accepted to MTSU and recently applied for housing.

“I’m pretty sure I’m going to come here,” he said, adding he plans to major in journalism to pursue a media career. He attended with his father, Steve Rex.

Miller, who visited MTSU several months ago, was impressed by MTSU’s newsroom. He visited with his parents, Johnny and Kim Miller.

Veteran MTSU professor Willis Means, left, shares aspects of being an elementary education major with prospective students and their parents attending the True Blue Experience Day Friday (Jan. 30). (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

Veteran MTSU professor Willis Means, left, shares aspects of being an elementary education major with prospective students and their parents attending the True Blue Experience Day Jan. 30. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

Carbaugh, visiting along with her father, Steve, said she “loved the classrooms. They seem designed toward a smaller classroom, and the entire (College of Education) building is very nicely designed.” She and other prospective students met Dean Lana Seivers in the college’s conference room.

Carbaugh said hearing from early childhood education professor Willis Means and Educational Leadership faculty members Heather Dillard and Nancy Caukin made “me want to get out of high school now because they knew what they were doing, made it interesting and are passionate about education.”

Prospective students visiting the Jennings A. Jones College of Business in the Business and Aerospace Building met Dean David Urban and heard an overview of the college; they interacted with a panel of current students and young alumni; and attended a microeconomics course required of all students in the college.

David Urban, dean of the Jones College of Business, greets prospective students and discusses its numerous outstanding programs and departments. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

David Urban, dean of the Jones College of Business, greets prospective students and discusses its numerous outstanding programs and departments. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

“The Carnegie program helps you make connections with people and offers several leadership skills,” said Evan Hemontolor, who lives in Lebanon, Tennessee, and was joined by his mother, Medana Hemontolor.

Evan Hemontolor enjoyed a panel of young alumni “who were good at answering questions and made you want to attend MTSU,” he said.

The Jones College of Business departments include accounting, business communication and entrepreneurship, computer information systems, economics and finance and management and marketing. To learn about the college’s various programs, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/business/programs.php.

The College of Education’s departments include elementary and special education and the Womack Educational Leadership. For its programs, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/education/programs.php.

Under the leadership of Dean Ken Paulson, Mass Comm houses the departments of electronic media communication, journalism and recording industry. For the various programs, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/masscomm/programs.php.

Melinda Thomas, director of undergraduate recruitment, shared with attendees about the MTSU Student Success Advantage and the “Graduate in Four and Get More” program, both announced in 2014 to help reduce the financial burden of tuition. For more information, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/student-success-advantage/.

For information on upcoming admissions events and to pre-register, visit www.mtsu.edu/rsvp.

Admissions also conducts daily campus tours. For more information, call 615-898-5670 or email tours@mtsu.edu.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

 

Prospective MTSU students ‘experience’ nursing, theatre, more

Attending the Governor’s School for the Arts with an emphasis in theater at Middle Tennessee State University in 2013, Aaron Johnson “fell in love with this place.”

Johnson, who is from Kingsport in upper East Tennessee, applied and was accepted last fall. He visited MTSU again Jan. 23, participating in the True Blue Experience Day for the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Behavioral and Health Sciences.

While some prospective students observe current MTSU students in action in a classroom lab setting in Cason-Kennedy Nursing Building, School of Nursing Director Jenny Sauls discusses the program Friday (Jan. 23) during the True Blue Experience Day. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

While some prospective students observe current MTSU students in action in a classroom lab setting in Cason-Kennedy Nursing Building, School of Nursing Director Jenny Sauls discusses the program Jan. 23 during the True Blue Experience Day. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

The special experience day gave the 100-plus combined prospective students, their parents and family members a chance for an in-depth campus visit. They meet deans, faculty, advisers and other academic personnel; they talk to admissions and financial aid personnel; they can visit classes and laboratories, seeing MTSU students in action; and gain a glimpse of life at the university.

Johnson, a Dobyns-Bennett High School senior, took in a child drama class taught by Department of Speech and Theatre professor Jette Halladay.

“I thought it was really cool, being able to jump into a class. It was a real eye-opener,” said Johnson, who made the 300-mile trip with his mother, Jennifer Campbell, and grandmother, Sharon Salyer, both from Kingsport. “Everyone was in good spirits, the teacher, especially, and the students.”

While at the Governor’s School nearly two years ago, Johnson said MTSU speech and theatre chair Jeff Gibson proved to be “an awesome mentor.”

“He (Gibson) assures me I can have an awesome time here,” added Johnson, who is a member of the Dobyns-Bennett Dramahawks forensics club.

School of Nursing Director Jenny Sauls and associate professor Sherri Stevens showed two different groups of potential students around Cason-Kennedy Nursing Building. Sauls’ tour included a large clinical lab, where MTSU students were performing hands-on activities. Stevens’ last tour stop was the Advanced Simulator Lab.

“It’s like a real hospital setting,” Stevens told the visitors.

Sabrina Deberry of Lexington, Tennessee, found Stevens’ tour “very interesting.”

“I’ve seen some things (mannequin) I’ve taken classes on and I’ve seen a simulator,” added Deberry, a junior at Lexington High School. Rochelle Deberry, her mother, and sister Keeambra Green, an MTSU alumna Class of 2011, joined Sabrina Deberry for the True Blue Experience Day. Green is a dental hygienist.

MTSU School of Music Director Michael Parkinson tells prospective students and their parents many advantages of the program Friday (Jan. 23) in the Wright Music Building during the True Blue Experience Day.

MTSU School of Music Director Michael Parkinson tells prospective students and their parents many advantages of the program Jan. 23 in the Wright Music Building during the True Blue Experience Day.

Best friends and Bradley Central High School seniors Callie Morgan and Chloe Wallace of Cleveland, Tennessee, eagerly await returning to MTSU in late August after applying, being accepted and attending the experience day.

“I loved it (MTSU) — the layout, the plans. It suits me and my goals (to be a nursing student),” Morgan said.

“I really like how they have hands-on experience, (and) I like all the faculty I’ve met,” Wallace said. “It seems like I’ll enjoy it here.”

Five students and their parents heard an excellent overview of the School of Music by Director Michael Parkinson and professor Stephen Smith.

“We not only want you to succeed, but to excel,” Parkinson said to the potential students.

Other Liberal Arts departments include art, English, foreign languages and literatures, history, philosophy, political science and sociology and anthropology.

Other Behavioral and Health Sciences departments include criminal justice administration, health and human performance, human sciences, psychology and social work.

The visitors came from Michigan, West Virginia and North Carolina. In Tennessee, the range was from Memphis to Elizabethton.

The True Blue Experience Day for the MTSU Colleges of Business, Education and Mass Communication will be held Friday, Jan. 30. To pre-register for any of the Office of Admissions special events this winter and spring, visit www.mtsu.edu/rsvp or call 615-898-5670.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

 

True Blue Experience Days help kick-start next recruiting phase

Continuing a busy season to attract new and transfer students for the 2015-16 academic year and beyond, MTSU’s upcoming recruiting events include back-to-back True Blue Experience Days.

In this file photo Shatima White, second from right, a senior at Central High School in Memphis, Tennessee, shows initiative in discussing an aspect of MTSU assistant professor David Nelson's biology research during the Oct. 17 True Blue Experience Day for the College of Basic and Applied Sciences in the new Science Building. (MTSU file photo by News and Media Relations)

Shatima White, second from right, a senior at Central High School in Memphis, Tennessee, discusses an aspect of MTSU assistant professor David Nelson’s biology research during the Oct. 17 True Blue Experience Day for the College of Basic and Applied Sciences in the new Science Building. (MTSU file photo by News and Media Relations)

They will be held Friday, Jan. 23, for prospective students in the College of Liberal Arts or College of Behavioral and Health Sciences and Friday, Jan. 30, for students considering a major in the College of Business, College of Education or College of Mass Communication.

True Blue Experience Days offer potential students, their parents and families an opportunity for an in-depth campus visit. They are able to view campus facilities; meet deans, advisers, faculty and other academic staff; talk to admissions and financial aid personnel; and gain a sense of student life and the MTSU community.

The True Blue Experience Days run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and start in the Student Union Building, located at 1768 MTSU Blvd.

To register for any of the Office of Admissions special events this winter and spring, visit www.mtsu.edu/rsvp or call 615-898-5670. Parking and campus building information is available on a printable campus map at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParking14-15.

For the Jan. 23 True Blue Experience Day, Dean Terry Whiteside of MTSU’s College of Behavioral and Health Sciences said two hours will be set aside for “various opportunities that will be planned for students to visit our departments and the majors, and get a feel of what’s going on.”

Departments in Whiteside’s college include criminal justice administration, health and human performance, human sciences, the School of Nursing, psychology and social work.

The College of Liberal Arts departments “are excited to share with prospective students and their parents the variety of options we offer for study and preparation for a fulfilling career,” said Lucy Langworthy, advising manager for the college.

“(Prospective) students will get to attend classes in their areas of interest and meet students and professors who will answer relevant questions,” said Langworthy, who noted that visitors will “get tours of our facilities and see such space as the production area in theatre, observe letterpress printing in art and visit rehearsal and performance halls in the music department.”

MTSU’s Bonnie McCarty, left, former assistant director of scholarships, talks with incoming freshman Natalie Porter, right, and her father, Steve Porter, in this file photo from a 2014 True Blue Experience Day at the Student Union Building. Natalie Porter is a finance major in the Jones College of Business. McCarty is now an adviser in the College of Behavioral and Health Sciences. (MTSU file photo by Andy Heidt)

MTSU’s Bonnie McCarty, left, former assistant director of scholarships, talks with incoming freshman Natalie Porter, right, and her father, Steve Porter, in this file photo from a spring 2014 True Blue Experience Day at the Student Union Building. Natalie Porter is a finance major in the Jones College of Business. McCarty is now an adviser in the College of Behavioral and Health Sciences. (MTSU file photo by Andy Heidt)

Music faculty will also discuss music concentrations and career choices and give prospective students pointers on preparing for an audition, Langworthy said.

School of Music audition dates include Saturday, Jan. 31; Monday, Feb. 16; and Saturday, Feb. 28. To learn more, visit www.mtsu.edu/music or call 615-898-2469.

Liberal arts departments also include art, English, foreign languages and literatures, history, philosophy, political science, sociology and anthropology and speech and theatre. Dr. Mark Byrnes serves as college dean.

For the Jan. 30 True Blue Experience Day, participating colleges have several plans for visitors.

Prospective College of Education students and family members will be in the renovated Ned McWherter Learning Resources Center for most of the program, said Jim Rost, advising manager in the college. Dean Lana Seivers will address the visitors, and associate professor Willis Means will conduct a 30-minute interactive teaching activity.

The student teaching residency team will lead a 30-minute teaching-specific activity. A tour of the College of Education Building will include brief visits while classes are in session.

Students considering majors in the Jones College of Business will meet with Dean David Urban and interact with a panel of current students and young alumni, said Amie Donahue, a college adviser. Once the panel ends, participants will join a microeconomics course, which is required of all students in the college.

A pair of advisers will have information at a table in the Student Union Ballroom from 9 to 10 a .m. Departments include accounting, business communication and entrepreneurship, computer information systems, economics and finance and management and marketing.

College of Mass Communication visitors will see an “interactive media showcase” that Dean Ken Paulson said will offer prospective students “the chance for hands-on experiences with video and photography, music production and a range of digital media.” Departments include electronic media communication, journalism and recording industry. Associated mass comm programs include media study and media management, public relations, and video and film production.

The True Blue Experience Day for the College of Basic and Applied Sciences was held Oct. 17.

Other special events this semester include the Monday, Feb. 16, University Honors College Presidents’ Day Open House, which is expected to attract about 700 people from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m, and Spring Preview Days scheduled for Saturday, March 21, and Saturday, June 6.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)