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Help MTSU students keep house with ‘Great Giveaway’ donations

New and gently used household items can serve as the foundation for a new home and a new life for some MTSU students in the annual “Great Giveaway.”

nternational students choose their bicycles in the 2014 Great Giveaway sponsored by MTSU’s Raiders for Christ student organization, 1105 E. Bell St. in Murfreesboro. The 2015 Great Giveaway is slated for 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Aug. 22. (Photos courtesy of MTSU Raiders for Christ)

International students choose their bicycles in the 2014 Great Giveaway sponsored by MTSU’s Raiders for Christ student organization, 1105 E. Bell St. in Murfreesboro. The 2015 Great Giveaway is slated for 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Aug. 22. (Photos courtesy of MTSU Raiders for Christ)

Raiders for Christ, an MTSU student organization, will accept donations of gently used and new furniture and other goods from 8:30 a.m. to midnight Saturday, Aug. 1, through Wednesday, Aug. 19, at its headquarters, 1105 E. Bell St. in Murfreesboro.

The items will be given to MTSU international students from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Aug. 22.

“Most of those are new students to MTSU, but some of the international students will come back year after year,” said Sarah Johnson, director of women’s outreach for Raiders for Christ.

Johnson said the group needs such items as couches, tables, chairs, beds, dishes, pots and pans, bicycles, small appliances, sheets and pillowcases, pillows, eating utensils and umbrellas.

Donors are asked not to contribute televisions, computers or any perishable items.

RFC logo web“Almost all of the furniture gets taken, especially the beds,” said Johnson. “Bicycles go really well because most of them don’t have cars or any kind of transportation.”

Some contributors choose to go to discount stores and purchase sponges, mops, brooms, dishwashing liquid, towels and washcloths to donate to take a few housekeeping worries off the students’ checklists.

On Aug. 22, each student who lines up at the RFC office will receive two Post-it notes. They can write their names on the notes and tag two large items that they want while gathering as many small items as they desire. Volunteers with trucks will help the students transport the larger items to their residences.

Many items find their way back to Raiders for Christ for others to use when the international students graduate or return to their home countries.

“The students are really good about donating the items back when they’re finished and they go back home,” said Johnson.

To donate items or for more information, contact Raiders for Christ at 615-896-1529 or email Johnson at sarahfjohnson@yahoo.com.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

International students line up to search for free donated furniture and household goods in the 2014 Great Giveaway at MTSU’s Raiders for Christ headquarters. The 2015 Great Giveaway is set Aug. 22.

International students line up to search for free donated furniture and household goods to outfit their homes away from home in the 2014 Great Giveaway at MTSU’s Raiders for Christ headquarters. The 2015 Great Giveaway is set Aug. 22.

CIM’s artificial reef already attracting ocean occupants [VIDEO]

Talk about meeting housing needs: An artificial reef created in the Dominican Republic by MTSU concrete industry management students this summer is already generating some underwater real-estate traffic.

In this video screen grab, an octopus swims with a fish toward the cube-shaped concrete prisms of an artificial reef created and installed by MTSU concrete industry management students this summer in the waters off the northern coast of Dominican Republic. Each prism is about 3 feet wide by 3 feet high. (Video by Eric Hertsens of Miami/Fort Lauderdale, Florida)

In this video screen grab, an octopus swims with a fish toward the cube-shaped concrete prisms of an artificial reef created and installed by MTSU concrete industry management students this summer in the waters off the northern coast of Dominican Republic. Each prism is about 3 feet wide by 3 feet high. (Video by Eric Hertsens of Miami/Fort Lauderdale, Florida)

The Concrete Industry Management Program shared a new video by Belgian native Eric Hertsens, now a Miami/Fort Lauderdale-based businessman and water sportsman who films his dives in the waters off Cabarete, located in the Puerto Plata province of the Dominican Republic.

In the July 16 video, an octopus makes his way around the cube-shaped concrete prisms created and installed in the waters off the northern coastal town of Sosúa by MTSU CIM students in May and June. Each prism is about 3 feet wide by 3 feet high.

The octopus investigates the reef’s sides and corners with the help — or possibly hindrance — of some curious fish.

It then meets with a diver, whose attempts at some friendly tickles finally cause an amazing change.

http://youtu.be/YJUt5crhCpo

You can find the full story here about the CIM students’ study-abroad adventures in the Dominican Republic.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Baseball Hall of Fame intern hits a grand slam on ‘MTSU On the Record’

A college student who is living a baseball fan’s most cherished dream spoke about her work on a recent edition of “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Sarah Calise

Sarah Calise

Host Gina Logue’s interview with MTSU student Sarah Calise first aired July 20 on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ). You can listen to their conversation below.

National Baseball Hall of Fame logo

Calise, a Gainesville, Florida, native pursuing a master’s degree in public history, is working this summer at the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, under the Frank and Peggy Steele Internship Program for Youth Leadership Development.

Each of the 19 interns specializes in aspects of museum work that include education, digital strategy, manuscript archives and library research. Calise aspires to become a museum curator after graduation.

“Every morning is my favorite part of the day, because I get to walk through the Hall of Fame plaque gallery,” Calise said. “You’re walking through history, basically, every morning. It humbles you and you realize that you’re working in such a fantastic place.”

To learn more about the Steele Internship Program, go to http://baseballhall.org/education/internship-program.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information, contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

America’s entry into WWII lives in music on ‘MTSU On the Record’

An MTSU student who was inspired to set Pearl Harbor to music was the guest on a recent edition of the “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Blair Boothe

Blair Boothe

This poster, designed by artist Allen R. Sandburg, was issued by the Office of War Information, Washington, D.C., in 1942 in remembrance of the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941. (Illustration courtesy of the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration)

This poster, designed by artist Allen R. Sandburg, was issued by the Office of War Information, Washington, D.C., in 1942 in remembrance of the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941. (Illustration courtesy of the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration)

Host Gina Logue’s interview with student composer Blair Boothe first aired July 6 on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ). You can listen to their conversation below.

Boothe, a senior from Culleoka, Tennessee, majoring in instrumental music education, introduced “A Date Which Will Live in Infamy” in an April 30 performance by the Columbia Winds at Columbia Central High School.

Columbia Winds is a 50-piece band of high school juniors and seniors who play woodwind, brass and percussion instruments.

Boothe said he was inspired to compose a piece that recalled the opening salvo of America’s involvement in World War II by watching a History Channel documentary.

“In my compositions, I like to think of a story or a progression of events or an item or a person, something that the audience can relate to as they listen to a piece,” said Boothe.

“So, during the Pearl Harbor piece, I like for them to be able to go through in their head and, by what they’re listening to, be able to tell what’s taking place.”

Musical segments of “A Date Which Will Live in Infamy,” taken from the April 30 performance, are included in the broadcast.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

A video clip of the interview also is available below.

https://youtu.be/t1j4SPtTR0U

Life slows down for MTSU study-abroad students in Pacific paradise

Imagine a class full of college students giving up their cell phones for 10 days.

In an early-summer 2015 study-abroad class taught in Fiji, MTSU students took advantage of the Pacific Ocean nation’s mostly unwired, nondigital atmosphere to explore a dramatically different culture.

The 2015 MTSU Fiji study-abroad class poses on the beach. Instructor Ray Wiley is standing second from left on the back row.  (Photos courtesy of Ray Wiley)

The 2015 MTSU Fiji study-abroad class poses on the beach. Instructor Ray Wiley is standing second from left on the back row. (Photos courtesy of Ray Wiley)

From May 28 to June 7, 13 students in the global studies course hiked through lush tropical forests, dove in crystal-clear waters teeming with marine life and feasted on organically grown fruits and vegetables.

“You don’t have service on your cellphone, and the Wi-Fi was here and there,” said Adam Thompson, a graduate student from Copperas Cove, Texas, majoring in leisure and sport management.

Fiji is an archipelago of 332 islands in the South Pacific about halfway between Hawaii and New Zealand. About 110 of the islands are inhabited, and the population is about 903,000.

As the students swam in depths of about 20 to 30 feet, they found themselves in a wet wonderland like no other.

“The soft coral was just absolutely phenomenal,” said Ray Wiley, associate director of campus recreation and instructor for the course. “You can go all over the world, but I don’t think you will find any greater collection of soft coral than you’ll find in Fiji.”

Thompson unexpectedly found himself swimming with a sea turtle who apparently didn’t mind sharing a bit of his habitat with a human being. He described the experience in a word: “breathtaking.”

In a modern variation on Tarzan’s network of vines, the class enjoyed the unique form of land/air transportation known as zip lining. They donned harnesses and slid on inclined metal cables stretched from tree to tree.

Even more appealing to the students than the activities, however, were the Fijian people.

MTSU graduate student Adam Thompson swims with a sea turtle off the coast of the Republic of Fiji during his 2015 study-abroad class.

MTSU graduate student Adam Thompson swims with a sea turtle off the coast of the Republic of Fiji during his 2015 study-abroad class.

“They are so humble and really show you the importance of family, hard work and faith,” said Karly Cordell, a multimedia journalism major from Dunlap, Tennessee.

Ray Wiley

Ray Wiley

“Everything they do is natural,” added Wiley. “They’re not sitting in a room hearing a marketing spiel about taking care of people. It’s not an act. They are who they are.”

Of course, the trip wasn’t all a recreational jaunt.

The students learned about the country’s educational system by visiting schools, and they helped plant trees at Sigatoka Sand Dunes National Park on the main island of Viti Levu. The 20 new trees will help reduce the potential for brush fires and erosion.

The class required the students blog every day, create a website for their photos and analyze four local businesses by chronicling the firms’ strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats.

The learning process included much more than homework for these students, however; it included a new perspective on life.

“Being in Fiji has really opened my eyes at how easily it is to become caught up in materialistic things rather than focusing on the things that really matter,” said Cordell. “‘Vinaka and sotatali, Fiji,’ which means ‘thank you’ and ‘see you later’ in English.”

For more information about this study-abroad trip, contact Wiley at 615-898-2104 or ray.wiley@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

CIM study-abroad group builds reef, alliances in Dominican [+VIDEO]

Ten MTSU Concrete Industry Management students recently took a study-abroad trip to the Dominican Republic where they formed and poured concrete prisms used to make artificial reefs.

MTSU Concrete Industry Management students work on the beach to prepare forms and mix concrete for use in making an artificial reef. The students were on a study-abroad trip to the Dominican Republic. (Submitted photo)

MTSU Concrete Industry Management students work on the beach to prepare forms and mix concrete to make an artificial reef. The students were on a study-abroad trip to the Dominican Republic. (Photos submitted)

Nicole Green, CIM marketing and recruiting coordinator, said the group of students, escorted by three CIM staff members, including department chair Dr. Heather Brown, visited the island for 10 days in late May and early June.

Students flew into Santo Domingo and traveled by bus to the northern coastal town of Sosúa to work. The northern coast is less traveled than the Caribbean side of the island, but a new cruise ship port in nearby Puerto Plata may soon change that, bringing tourists to add to the local economy.

Before leaving MTSU, students tested a mock form of the cube-shaped prisms in the CIM lab and created a template to help build the forms on the island.

“They put their communication and concrete skills to the test when they had to acquire construction materials, use the local materials to determine the right ratio for a successful mix, and mix the concrete by hand and with a drill mixer,” Green said.

Although mixing on the beach, students worked hard from breakfast to dinner, taking only a half-day off to visit local waterfalls, Green said. A total of 19 concrete prisms were made to place in the ocean just off the coast to help promote marine life.

During the trip, a top official with the nation’s ministry of marine ecology visited and was excited about the project, telling the group that the ministry would monitor the artificial reef’s success by transplanting sea fans and other species of marine life onto the newly placed concrete prisms to observe growth.

Green gave special thanks to the CIM Patrons group for funding part of the trip and to Northern Coast Diving in the Dominican Republic for assisting students in navigating the island, finding materials for the concrete, certifying a few students to scuba dive, and placing the concrete prisms in the ocean.

CIM hopes to return to build on the project next summer.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

The entire MTSU study-abroad group to the Dominican Republic is shown here with their completed cube-shaped prisms to used in an artificial reef. From left to right: Dr. Heather Brown, Mack Lambert, Ashley Blanton, top, Morgan Corlew, Tyler Woolman, Celecita Williams, Nick Langlois, Katie Poss, Cole Durio, Hayden Bilyeu, Roger Insyxiengmay and Sally Bradford. (Submitted photo)

The entire MTSU study-abroad group to the Dominican Republic is shown here with their completed cube-shaped prisms to use in an artificial reef. From left to right are Dr. Heather Brown, Mack Lambert, Ashley Blanton, Morgan Corlew, Tyler Woolman, Celecita Williams, Nick Langlois, Katie Poss, Cole Durio, Hayden Bilyeu, Roger Insyxiengmay and Sally Bradford.

MTSU Concrete Industry Management junior Nick Langlois pours concrete into a cube-shaped prism form to be used in an artificial reef. Langlois was part of a group of CIM students on a study-abroad trip to the Dominican Republic. (Submitted photo)

MTSU Concrete Industry Management junior Nick Langlois pours concrete into a cube-shaped prism form to be used in an artificial reef. Langlois was part of a group of CIM students on a study-abroad trip to the Dominican Republic.

MTSU Concrete Industry Management senior Katie Poss sands concrete off a used form for reuse to build an artificial reef during a study-abroad trip to the Dominican Republic. (Submitted photo)

MTSU Concrete Industry Management senior Katie Poss sands concrete off a used form for reuse to build an artificial reef during a study-abroad trip to the Dominican Republic.

Watch a short video of the reef installation below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e4jnnCuwmQY

MTSU solar boat team claims second place, 8 national awards

MTSU’s solar boat team sailed confidently against a strong field competing in a recent national competition in Dayton, Ohio.

The team’s confidence with the solar boat they nicknamed “True Blue” lived up to their expectations in the 2015 Solar Splash, an American Society of Mechanical Engineers-sponsored event.

MTSU solar boat team members are shown with their vessel, "True Blue," during a break in the action at the 2015 Solar Splash competition on Lake George Wyth in Dayton, Ohio. The team placed second overall in the national event. (Submitted photo)

MTSU solar boat team members are shown with their vessel, “True Blue,” during a break in the action at the 2015 Solar Splash competition on Lake George Wyth in Dayton, Ohio. The team placed second overall in the national event. (Submitted photos)

With its highest finish ever, MTSU placed second to host Cedarville University in the 16-team event held on Lake George Wyth.

Dr. Saeed Foroudastan

Dr. Saeed Foroudastan

Solar Splash, officially named the International Intercollegiate Solar/Electric Boat Regatta, is the world championship of intercollegiate solar/electric boating. Teams come from across the country to compete.

“I’m extremely proud of the team’s effort and showing,” said Saeed Foroudastan, adviser and director of the university’s Experimental Vehicles Program. “The forethought, dedication and engineering improvements that were necessary to bring this year’s entry to fruition earned eight awards, the greatest number of honors to date at the Solar Splash competition.”

The eight awards include:

  • Outstanding Design Achievement Award, presented by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Power Electronics Society.
  • First place in Solar Slalom.
  • Second place in qualifying, presented by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Solar Energy division. To receive this award, the boat must have the best overall design to qualify for the race.
  • Second place in the sprint competition.
  • Outstanding Workmanship and Sportsmanship awards.
  • Third-place award for visual display.
  • Second place overall.
MTSU solar boat team members and advisers prepare the boat for takeoff. (Submitted photo)

MTSU solar boat team members and advisers prepare the boat for takeoff.

Rising senior Lindsey Blankenship of Lexington, Tennessee, and junior David Sprouls of Danville, Illinois, piloted the boat as the respective endurance and speed event drivers.

“It went well with new batteries, but not as well as we would’ve liked, but all in all, it was good,” Blankenship said. “I’m very happy and proud of finishing second. I was nervous during the race because there had been a few collisions.”

“We achieved 24 miles per hour. That’s the fastest we’ve gone,” Sprouls added. “We did not have a single problem. … The other boat, from Cedarville, was really fast. We sharpened the edge of the propeller. It made us a little faster, but we were still behind them.”

Even with the best lead-acid batteries that MTSU can buy, the top speed lasts only about one minute, said Sprouls, a mechatronics engineering major.

Blankenship, a double major in physics and math, also will be a member of the 2015-16 team. The team will be captained by Sprouls and plans to design a new boat.

“We’ll start with a blank slate,” Sprouls said. “Hopefully, it will be as nice as this one.”

This year’s MTSU entry was a modified version of the boat that competed in 2014.

Other team members included Matthew Ham, Michael Raymond, Melissa Sanders, Brian Reyes, Rizwan Syed, Robert Johnson and Zach Hunter. Rick Taylor and graduate students Cary Woodson and Jeremy Posey served as advisers.

The MTSU Experimental Vehicles Program is housed in the Department of Engineering Technology, one of 11 departments in the College of Basic and Applied Sciences.

For more information about the program, call 615-494-8786 or email Foroudastan at Saeed.Foroudastan@mtsu.edu.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

The MTSU solar boat team collected eight awards at the 2015 Solar Splash in Dayton, Ohio.

The MTSU solar boat team collected eight awards at the 2015 Solar Splash in Dayton, Ohio.

 

ASCAP hosts private showcase for MTSU songwriting program

NASHVILLE — ASCAP recently held a private showcase at their offices for Nashville music publishers showcasing Middle Tennessee State University’s songwriting program.

Performing were student writers Nick Carpenter, Zach Russell, Kyle Crownover, and the group “Maybe April,” which includes MTSU’s Katy Bishop and Kristen Castro along with Alaina Stacy. Publishing companies in attendance were Sony/ATV, Warner Chapel, BMG, Sea-Gayle Music, Creative Nation, and Round Hill Music.

ASCAP recently held a private showcase at their offices for Nashville music publishers showcasing Middle Tennessee State University’s commercial songwriting program. Pictured top row, from left, are students Nick Carpenter, Kyle Crownover, ASCAP Vice President LeAnn Phalen, student Zach Russell, MTSU Songwriting Concentration Coordinator Odie Blackmon; bottom row, from left, "Maybe April" members Alaina Stacey, Kristen Castro and Katy Bishop. (Submitted photo)

ASCAP recently held a private showcase at their offices for Nashville music publishers showcasing Middle Tennessee State University’s commercial songwriting program. Pictured top row, from left, are students Nick Carpenter, Kyle Crownover, ASCAP Vice President LeAnn Phalen, student Zach Russell, MTSU Songwriting Concentration Coordinator Odie Blackmon; bottom row, from left, “Maybe April” members Alaina Stacey, Kristen Castro and Katy Bishop. (Submitted photo)

Located just a half-hour south of Nashville, MTSU offers its students exceptional opportunities through the Department of Recording Industry’s commercial songwriting program. The program is led by veteran songwriter Odie Blackmon, who continues to strengthen partnerships with organizations such as the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP).

The program is taught by talented faculty members who have ties to all parts of the industry and is home to the only college chapter of the Nashville Songwriters Association International (NSAI). For more information about the program, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/programs/commercial-songwriting/.

‘MTSU On the Record’ spotlights student’s opposition to state logo

The uproar over the state of Tennessee’s new marketing logo was the focus of a recent “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Kyle Elliott first aired June 15 on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ). You can listen to their conversation here.

Kyle Elliott

Kyle Elliott

TN logo webElliott, an electronic media communication major from Hermitage, Tennessee, solicited comments on Twitter using the hashtag #SavetheTristar to draw attention to the logo controversy via his Twitter account, @TheKyleElliott.

Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration paid $46,000 for a Nashville-based public relations firm to create the logo, which is a red square emblazoned with the letters “TN” in white and a blue bar underneath.

While the logo does not replace the figure of three stars on a blue field on the predominantly red state flag, statewide and national reaction to the new logo has been overwhelmingly negative and full of ridicule.

“I’ve talked to some friends about it, and they’ve said, ‘You know, that money could have been put toward my college tuition,’” Elliott said. “It’s just government spending that’s not necessary.”

Elliott has discussed the reaction to the logo on WMTS-FM, MTSU’s student radio station. He also promoted a petition on www.change.org calling for the logo to be dumped. Elliott said more than 2,500 people have signed the petition to date.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

A video clip of the interview is available below.

https://youtu.be/NFwVWPABxbA

MTSU students get ‘real-world training’ at Bonnaroo [+VIDEO]

MANCHESTER, Tenn. — Amanda Pierce is one of thousands of students taking a class this summer at Middle Tennessee State University.

But unlike most, her classroom is behind one of the stages at the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival, where she is serving as student production manager for the MTSU Mobile Production Lab.

Robert Gordon, an assistant professor of electronic media communication in MTSUÕs College of Mass Communication, briefs his student crew before beginning preparations for a shoot Thursday afternoon, June 11, at the 2015 Bonnaroo Music and Arts FestivalÕs Who Stage. (MTSU photo by Andrew Oppmann)

Robert Gordon, an assistant professor of electronic media communication in MTSU’s College of Mass Communication, briefs his student crew before beginning preparations for a shoot June 11 at the 2015 Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival’s Who Stage. (MTSU photos by Andrew Oppmann)

“I think it will help me kick-start my career and my leadership abilities,” said Pierce, a senior from Murfreesboro majoring in electronic media communication in the College of Mass Communication.

“It’s totally awesome for a classroom.”

Pierce is among about 40 MTSU students, faculty and staff working at the four-day festival under the second year of a unique partnership between the university and festival organizers Superfly Presents and AC Entertainment.

Twenty-eight are working with cameras and control boards in MTSU’s mobile studio, capturing performances on the festival’s Who Stage. The rest are working as multimedia journalists, filing stories and videos for area news media outlets.

“Our friends at Bonnaroo have been extraordinarily generous and supportive, giving our students a singular educational opportunity and invaluable hands-on experience,” mass communication Dean Ken Paulson said.

“It’s important that we extend our teaching beyond the walls of our college to the places where contemporary media and entertainment are at their best.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=25bOzmx0uDI

Pierce manages the student crew of camera operators, sound technicians, producers and technicians under the direction of assistant professor Robert Gordon, who has almost 40 years of experience in broadcast, cable and network programming.

Students and instructors from MTSUÕs College of Mass Communication mount a center-stage camera at the Bonnaroo Music and Arts FestivalÕs Who Stage on Thursday afternoon. (MTSU photo by Andrew Oppmann)

Students and instructors from MTSU’s College of Mass Communication mount a center-stage camera at the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival’s Who Stage June 11.

“MTSU at Bonnaroo is giving students realistic, real-world training, producing several video concert performances per day — live, no rehearsal, all in one take,” Gordon said.

“Our time at Bonnaroo is as hands-on and as realistic an experience as can be offered.”

Meanwhile, on the other side of the 700-acre site, veteran journalists Pat Embry, director of MTSU’s John Seigenthaler Chair of Excellence for First Amendment Studies, and journalism associate professor Leon Alligood are mentoring the student on-site content team.

The team’s work can be found on the website of MTSU’s student newspaper, Sidelines (www.mtsusidelines.com) and other area media outlets, including The Tennessean and the Murfreesboro Pulse.

Students set up and conducted their own advance phone interviews with Nashville-based rock bands playing at Bonnaroo, Embry said. They will work each day from midmorning until late at night, filing stories, taking photos and shooting video.

“From a student standpoint, the experience in building a portfolio is unparalleled,” he said. “Having so many editors and veteran writers and reporters on site to help the students with their work is invaluable.”

Gordon, over at the Who Stage, echoed that thought: “Students get jobs from experiences like these.”

— Andrew Oppmann (andrew.oppmann@mtsu.edu)

A group shot of students, faculty and staff from MTSU's College of Mass Communication, all of whom will be working at the Who Stage at the 2015 Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in Manchester, Tenn. (MTSU photo by Andrew Oppmann)

This group of students, faculty and staff from MTSU’s College of Mass Communication, all will be working at the Who Stage at the 2015 Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in Manchester, Tenn.

MTSUÕs Mobile Production Lab will serve as the video hub for the Who Stage at the 2015 Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival. (MTSU photo by Andrew Oppmann)

MTSU’s Mobile Production Lab will serve as the video hub for the Who Stage at the 2015 Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival.

Pat Embry, left, director of MTSUÕs Seigenthaler Chair of Excellence in First Amendment Studies, briefs a crew of student journalists preparing to cover ThursdayÕs opening day of the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in Manchester, Tenn. (MTSU photo by Andrew Oppmann)

Pat Embry, left, director of MTSU’s Seigenthaler Chair of Excellence in First Amendment Studies, briefs a crew of student journalists preparing to cover the June 11 opening day of the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in Manchester, Tenn.

A group shot of students and faculty from MTSU's College of Mass Communication, all of whom will be filing content for area media from the 2015 Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in Manchester, Tenn. (MTSU photo by Andrew Oppmann)

Students and faculty from MTSU’s College of Mass Communication who’ll be filing content for area media from the 2015 Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in Manchester, Tenn., pose for a group photo Aug. 11.