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MTSU seniors recognized for plans to restore 3 songwriters’ copyrights

Two MTSU seniors are the dual recipients of MTSU’s 2016 Chitwood Award for Excellence for their plans to help three best-selling songwriters reclaim ownership of two of their popular compositions.

Peyton Robinette

Peyton Robinette

Robert Williford

Robert Williford

Peyton Robinette and Robert Williford accepted the awards during a special ceremony Nov. 30 in MTSU’s Bragg Media and Entertainment Building.

Their honors recognize the best “Recapture Projects of 2015-16” proposed by a Department of Recording Industry student in MTSU associate professor Deborah Wagnon’s copyright law class.

The projects affect the songs “Dirty Pool,” created by the late musicians Stevie Ray Vaughan and Doyle Bramhall, and singer/songwriter Mike Reid’s classic “Stranger in My House,” performed by Ronnie Milsap.

Deborah Wagnon

Deborah Wagnon

“The power of each of these 1983 songs made this a particularly exciting opportunity to shine the light on both blues and country works that have stood the test of time,” Wagnon said.

The Recapture Project is tied to U.S. Copyright Act (Section 203), which lets copyright creators terminate their publishers’ rights and reclaim ownership of their songs or books after a 35-year moratorium. Each student studying copyright law with Wagnon is required to participate in the project.

Wagnon, who also is an entertainment business attorney, said she will contact the Vaughan and Bramhall estates and Reid’s representatives to present the students’ proposal.

Each of Wagnon’s students also must create a plan of action for the recaptured work, including information that’s needed to reclaim the copyright 35 years after the original grant, assignment or license was finalized.

“This means Peyton and Rob had to demonstrate a future plan hat will be inventive and timely in the marketplace as of Dec. 31, 2019,” Wagnon explained.

Robinette specifically sought out works by some of his favorite artists and realized the time frame would fit songs from Vaughan’s debut album, “Texas Flood.” The commercial songwriting major from Rockwood, Tennessee, recognized Bramhall’s name thanks to seeing the late musician’s son, Doyle Bramhall II, on stage with Eric Clapton.

“When I realized the connection between the two, my heart was set on the song ‘Dirty Pool,’” Robinette said. “This recapture project … blended legal process with art, allowing me to fully dive into my efforts.”

Doyle Bramhall

Doyle Bramhall

Stevie Ray Vaughn web

Stevie Ray Vaughn

Williford, a Nashville recording industry major who also is a songwriter and musician, said his project on Reid’s 1984 Grammy winner for best country song “presented a particularly interesting and educational opportunity to gain real-world experience in the publishing world.”

“Drafting a proposal outlining the process which would allow Mr. Reid to exercise his right to recapture his intellectual property was a unique, exciting endeavor,” he added. “I especially enjoyed the creative challenge of envisioning ideas for potential exploitation of his song in the future.”

Mike Reid webMTSU’s Department of Recording Industry inaugurated the Chitwood Award of Excellence in fall 2014 to honor recording industry major David “Ritt” Chitwood, who was killed in a January 2014 traffic accident near campus. Organizers said Chitwood, a Nolensville, Tennessee, resident, served as an inspiration for faculty and students alike because of his optimism and eagerness to learn after surviving a near-fatal 2006 car wreck.

They expanded the award this year to also honor the estate of Charles Monroe Johnson, a Tennessee attorney, author and World War II veteran whose 1954 memoir, “Action with the Seaforths,” had fallen into the public domain and has now been restored to Johnson’s family in a new copyrighted derivative work with new photos, a foreword by Johnson’s daughter, Mona, and a new cover illustrated by recording industry graduate Victoria Richardson.

Wagnon began the Recapture Project in 2011 for her copyright law classes to encourage research and legal detail as well as creativity and entrepreneurial thinking. Copyright law is a required course in MTSU’s Department of Recording Industry, which is a part of the university’s College of Media and Entertainment.

For more information about the Department of Recording Industry at MTSU, visit www.mtsu.edu/recording-industry.

MTSU scholar wins $1K study-abroad grant from Phi Kappa Phi

The nation’s oldest and most selective collegiate honor society has presented a $1,000 grant to an MTSU student.

Tiffany Miller

Tiffany Miller

Tiffany Miller, a junior from Bell Buckle, Tennessee, received the stipend from The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi. She is one of only 26 students nationwide to receive the study-abroad grant.

Miller, who majors in both international relations and Spanish, will use the money to study at Universidad Andres Bello in Santiago, Chile.

“Chile is considered one of the most prosperous nations in South America, and I’m intrigued by what mechanisms are in place in Chile that allow it to thrive,” said Miller.

phi kappa phi logo web“Understanding this blend of political and economic success will enrich my other interests in international relations and economics.”

Miller added that in her opinion, Chile is one of the most beautiful places that a person can visit.

“Santiago is nestled in between the Atacama Desert to the north, the Andes Mountains in the east, the Pacific Ocean in the west and frozen Patagonia in the south,” she said.

The MTSU student said she’s considering many options for her future, including seeking a Fulbright grant, attending graduate school and pursuing a career in higher education.

Founded in 1897, Phi Kappa Phi inducts approximately 30,000 students, faculty, professional staff and alumni each year. The society has chapters at more than 300 select colleges and universities, including MTSU.

Membership for undergraduates is by invitation only. It’s offered to the top 10 percent of seniors and graduate students and the top 7.5 percent of juniors.

For more information, contact Gina Logue, public affairs officer of MTSU’s Phi Kappa Phi chapter, at 615-898-5081 or gina.logue@mtsu.edu.

Dec. 1 deadline looms for prospective MTSU students’ applications

The message to prospective students from Middle Tennessee State University administrators and advertising campaigns this fall contains a specific deadline: Apply by Thursday, Dec. 1, or risk missing out on guaranteed scholarship money for those who meet the qualifications.

Laurie Witherow, left, associate vice provost for Student Affairs, talks about Middle Tennessee State University program opportunities with Kristi McHugh and her son, Brantley, of Gurley, Ala., during the True Blue Tour Recruiting visit to Huntsville, Ala., Oct. 11. Brantley McHugh, 16, is a junior at Madison County High School in nearby Gurley. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

In this October file photo, Dr. Laurie Witherow, left, associate vice provost for student affairs, talks about MTSU program opportunities and the importance of the Dec. 1 application deadline with Kristi McHugh and her son, Brantley, of Gurley, Ala., during the True Blue Tour recruiting visit at the U.S. Space & Rockent Center in Huntsville, Ala. Brantley McHugh, 16, is a junior at Madison County High School in Gurley. (MTSU file photo by Randy Weiler)

Guaranteed scholarships are available to high school seniors who plan to begin college at MTSU in August 2017 if those prospective students:

  • Meet academic requirements.
  • Complete the application.
  • Pay the application fee by Dec. 1.

“I have an assignment for the high school seniors over their Thanksgiving holiday: Apply to MTSU,” said Dr. Laurie Witherow, associate vice provost for undergraduate recruitment in the Division of Student Affairs.

Dr. Laurie Witherow

Dr. Laurie Witherow

“The application deadline for scholarship consideration is Dec. 1,” she added. “We need to have sixth-semester transcripts, ACT or SAT scores and an MTSU application by that date. MTSU guarantees scholarships to applicants who have at least a 25 ACT and a 3.5 high school GPA.

“Don’t miss out because you let the deadline slide.”

Guaranteed scholarships range from $2,000 to $5,000 a year for four years for recipients who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents. The awards include:

  • Chancellor’s Scholarship — $5,000 per year; requires a minimum 30 or higher ACT score and minimum 3.5 GPA.
  • Presidential Scholarship — $4,000 per year; requires a 28 ACT and 3.5 GPA.
  • True Blue Scholarship— $3,000 per year; requires a 26 ACT and 3.5 GPA.
  • Provost’s Scholarship — $2,000 per yearr; requires a 25 ACT and 3.5 GPA.

For equivalent SAT scores for these scholarships and other information, including the online scholarship guide, visit www.mtsu.edu/financial-aid/scholarships/incoming-freshmen.php.

Recipients must meet requirements for GPA, enrollment, satisfactory academic progress, and service, where applicable, to maintain their scholarship eligibility.

More information can be found at www.mtsu.edu/scholarships.

Prospective students whose applications are received after Dec. 1 may learn that scholarship money will not be available. Applications mailed to MTSU must be postmarked Dec. 1.

To learn more about the University Honors College and its Buchanan Fellowship, the highest award given to an entering MTSU freshman, visit www.mtsu.edu/honors.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Food for thought: MTSU dining cashiers urge student registration

Along with the food they will eat, MTSU students have received a friendly reminder as they use cash or their ID card to pay for their meals this week.

Sporting T-shirts that say “It’s Time to Register! Nov. 15-18,” caring MT Dining employees are urging students to complete priority registration for the spring 2017 semester in McCallie Dining Hall and RaiderZone in the James Union Building.

MTSU freshmen tennis player Tom Moonen, left, talks with RaiderZone cashier Alicia Gaines, who makes sure he has looked into and completed his priority registration for the spring 2017 semester. Moonen, a finance major, is from Rotterdam in The Netherlands. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

MTSU freshmen tennis player Tom Moonen, left, talks with RaiderZone cashier Alicia Gaines, who makes sure he has looked into and completed his priority registration for the spring 2017 semester. Moonen, a finance major, is from Rotterdam in The Netherlands. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

A partnership between the Office of Student Success and MT Dining emphasizes priority registration for the spring 2017 semester — and the method is working.

“Wednesday, I ate at the RaiderZone and was floored by how the cashiers were engaging the students,” said Vincent Windrow, vice provost for Student Success.

At the RaiderZone Nov. 17, associate professor Donald Campbell came up with this assessment: “You’ve got to eat. You’ve got to register.”

Just weeks before finals and with the Thanksgiving holiday break approaching, the cashiers are spreading the word so students do not wait until the last minute to register and be able to cross this important item off their to-do list.

“This is an incredible example of one of Dr. (Sidney A.) McPhee’s 10 keys to student success,” Windrow said. “We want the first-year students to understand how registering now positions them for success next semester. And, man, have they been on it — and we owe a lot of credit to the cashiers.”

For RaiderZone cashier Alicia Grimes of Murfreesboro, her ability to share with students “just comes naturally,” she said. “I care (about the students). I love our students.”

Aaliyah Gray, 18, a sophomore from the Bahamas, said she has registered and she’s “glad they’re concerned that everyone’s registered.” She added she just had “seen Mr. Vinny (Windrow). He asked if I had registered and asked about my classes this semester.”

In McCallie, cashier June Campbell of Murfreesboro said the registration awareness message is reaching students.

“They say, ‘I’ve already registered’ or ‘I’m waiting ’til Friday,’” she said. “I normally wear a black chef’s jacket. Most of the students look at my shirt and notice something’s different. … I think it’s a good thing to remind them. They are busy with midterms and other things. The shirt’s another visual reminder.”

Brandi Thomas, 19, a freshman from Memphis, Tennessee, just changed her major, from nursing to education and plans to meet with her adviser. She definitely “likes the idea” of the cashiers reminding them about registration.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MT Dining cashier June Campbell, left, checks with a trio of MTSU students, asking if they have taken care of their priority registration, which runs Nov. 15-18.

MT Dining cashier June Campbell, left, checks with a trio of MTSU students, asking if they have taken care of their priority registration, which runs Nov. 15-18.

MTSU freshman Nathan Belete, 18, of Nashville, Tenn., tells McCallie Dining cashier June Campbell his advising appointment will be Monday, Nov. 21, after she asks him if he has completed his priority registration Nov. 18.

MTSU freshman Nathan Belete, 18, of Nashville, Tenn., tells McCallie Dining cashier June Campbell his advising appointment will be Monday, Nov. 21, after she asks him if he has completed his priority registration Nov. 18.

MTSU hosts fun-filled ‘de-stressing’ event to prep students for final exams

Final exams are just weeks away for MTSU students and a host of organizations have banded together to help relieve the pressure.

The Raider Health Corps along with MTSU Health Promotion, Campus Recreation, the Nutrition and Dietetic Association and the Center for Accelerated Learning Acquisition partnered together to put on De-stress Fest.

Matt Formisano, left, community outreach coordinator for Healthworks Chiropractic, explains spinal functions to a student during the De-stress Fest held Wednesday, Nov. 16, at the MTSU Campus Recreation Center. (MTSU photo)

Matt Formisano, left, community outreach coordinator for Healthworks Chiropractic, explains spinal functions to a student during the De-stress Fest held Wednesday, Nov. 16, at the MTSU Campus Recreation Center. (MTSU photo)

Usually held every semester, De-stress Fest is designed to help students unwind and get prepared mentally and physically for final exams. The event began Monday, Nov. 14, as students were invited to participate in a free yoga class at the Rec Center.

Festivities continued Wednesday, Nov. 16, as students participated in a variety of games and events at the Rec, including massages, receiving healthy snack samples, guided meditation sessions and fitness assessments among other things.

All services were free for students and this year De-stress Fest was able to partner with Healthworks Chiropractic to bring an official chiropractor in for students. According to health educator Vinny Black, this new partnership is one of the most valuable aspects of the event.

“We were able to reach outside of campus and bring in the chiropractic folks, which is good since it’s a brand new partnership. It’s big, because we wanted to get the community involved as well with the campus groups,” he said.

From left, MTSU students Josh McCray, Krista Brown, and Matty Frutiger discuss proper eating habits at the De-stress Fest held Wednesday, Nov. 16, at the MTSU Campus Recreation Center. (MTSU photo)

From left, MTSU students Josh McCray, Krista Brown, and Matty Frutiger discuss proper eating habits at the De-stress Fest held Wednesday, Nov. 16, at the MTSU Campus Recreation Center. (MTSU photo)

Black said De-stress Fest receives normally 100 to 150 students each semester and he hopes that each year the event will continue to grow and get more campus and community groups to contribute and participate.

The final event will take place on Nov. 30 when Black and other members from the Raider Health Corps will pass out de-stress kits in the James E. Walker Library atrium.

“While students are working hard studying and knocking out papers, we’ll be passing out kits that’ll have some free tea bags, paprika, and coloring sheets for people that want to de-stress that way,” Black said. “We want to help students before the exams and try again while they’re in midst of them.”

For more information of De-stress Fest, contact the Raider Health Corps at 615-494-8704 or visit their website http://www.mtsu.edu/healthpro/peer-health.php.

— Steven Michael Johnson (news@mtsu.edu)

From left, MTSU students Joey Rosen, Lawrence Gant and Randon Allen work one of the snack booths at the De-stress Fest held Wednesday, Nov. 16, at the MTSU Campus Recreation Center. (MTSU photo)

From left, MTSU students Joey Rosen, Lawrence Gant and Randon Allen work one of the snack booths at the De-stress Fest held Wednesday, Nov. 16, at the MTSU Campus Recreation Center. (MTSU photo)

MTSU students visit the various booths at the De-stress Fest held Wednesday, Nov. 16, at the MTSU Campus Recreation Center. (MTSU photo)

MTSU students visit the various booths at the De-stress Fest held Wednesday, Nov. 16, at the MTSU Campus Recreation Center. (MTSU photo)

MTSU Debate Team resolves to continue its winning ways

The award-winning MTSU debaters hope to conclude their best season ever on a winning note this weekend.

MTSU Debate Team Co-captain Abby Barnes, left, and freshman team member Cameron Bowker pose in front of some of the trophies the team has won in intercollegiate competition. (Photo by MTSU News and Media Relations)

MTSU Debate Team Co-captain Abby Barnes, left, and freshman team member Cameron Bowker pose in front of some of the trophies the team has won in intercollegiate competition. (Photo by MTSU News and Media Relations)

Dr. Pat Richey, director of forensics and debate coach in MTSU’s Department of Communication Studies and Organizational Communication, will lead his team into Jefferson City, Tennessee, for the final tournament of the semester at Carson-Newman University Nov. 18 and 19.

They’re coming off a victorious Oct. 23-24 showing at Valdosta State University in Valdosta, Georgia, where MTSU finished first or second in most categories against bigger and better-funded schools.

“I think it was where the team came together and bonded well because the first few tournaments we had a lot of new people trying to figure out where they are in the squad,” Richey said.

“It was great to see the team come together and work not only to better themselves but other team members as well,” said co-captain Abby Barnes, a junior majoring in communication studies and English from Morristown, Tennessee.

In addition, Richey’s fellow coaches voted to give him the Coach of the Year award.

“I just do what I do,” Richey said. “I don’t think there’s anything special I do as a coach.”

What he does is prepare students, some of whom lacked high-school experience in debate, in the art of being able to prepare cogent, winning arguments on their feet and under deadline pressure.

Dr. Patrick Richey

Dr. Patrick Richey

The topics at Valdosta State included non-gendered bathrooms, climate change and whether Twitter should keep its 140-character-per-tweet limit.

Cameron Bowker, a freshman psychology major from Colorado Springs, Colorado, didn’t debate in high school but has blossomed under Richey’s tutelage.

“It has taught me to be much more aware of what I’m saying, what’s coming out of my mouth,” Bowker said. “I had a habit of speaking way too fast and using my hands way too much.”

For all the hardware that the team keeps collecting, Barnes said there’s much more to debating than winning.

“At the end of the day, we don’t just get trophies for the school,” she said. “We don’t just like arguing. We genuinely love each other, and we genuinely are a family.”

For more information, contact Richey at 615-898-2273 or patrick.richey@mtsu.edu or visit www.mtsu.edu/debate.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Global Entrepreneurship Week offers free workshops, lectures

MTSU students and the wider community have an opportunity to be exposed to a number of entrepreneurial ideas and strategies Nov. 14-18 during the university’s Global Entrepreneurship Week activities.

The keynote address will be given by serial entrepreneur Mark Cleveland, who will speak at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 15, in the State Farm Room S102 in the Business and Aerospace Building. It is free and open to the public.

Phil Gibbs

Phil Gibbs

Mark Cleveland

Mark Cleveland

Cleveland is co-founder and CEO of Hytch, a social enterprise and technology company “on a mission to reduce traffic in Middle Tennessee by bringing the digital age to carpooling.” Hytch’s ride-sharing app matches friends, neighbors and co-workers with a common trip so they can cut costs and share their commute.

In recent years, Cleveland has been named Entrepreneur of the Year by the Nashville Chamber of Commerce. He is developing a boutique hotel in downtown Nashville, and owns an online retailer of radio-controlled drones and airplanes, an athletic compression sock company and commercial music and marketing services company.

Earlier Thursday, Nov. 17, from 11:20 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. in the State Farm Room, Nashville entrepreneur Phil Gibbs will give a public presentation entitled “Your First Job: Secret Agent for Disruption and Exponential Growth.” Gibbs is a corporate consultant and a founder of The Disruption Lab, an innovation lab for corporations looking to try new business strategies.

GEW_LogoThroughout Global Entrepreneurship Week, free lectures, workshops and panel discussions will be held, all aimed at providing students and aspiring entrepreneurs with useful information on special topics ranging from apparel manufacturing to unmanned aerial systems and on general topics ranging from franchise startups to disruptive innovation.

Among the workshops geared toward the general public is “Show Me (how to get) The Money,” set from 3 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 15, at the Tennessee Small Business Development Center of MTSU, located inside the Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce, 3050 Medical Center Parkway. The speaker will be Leroy Cunningham, small business specialist at TSBDC.

Seating will be limited and registration requested for some events throughout the week. For the full list of events, including dates, times and locations, visit http://mtsu.edu/wrightchair/gew.php.

Dr. Bill McDowell

Dr. Bill McDowell

“We’re excited about this year’s slate of events, which again are geared toward helping aspiring entrepreneurs — whether students, alumni or community members — take the necessary steps toward bringing their business ideas into reality,” said Bill McDowell, holder of the Pam Wright Chair of Entrepreneurship in the Jones College of Business.

McDowell will be hosting workshops to teach MTSU students how to win the university’s business plan competition and also overseeing Wednesday’s entrepreneurship fair for area high school students. The invitation-only fair will feature participating students making elevator pitches and creating trade show displays to be judged by a panel of experts.

The week’s events are being sponsored by the Pam Wright Chair of Entrepreneurship and is being held in conjunction with the annual Global Entrepreneurship Week, an international celebration of innovators and job creators held each November.

Off-campus visitors attending the event should obtain a special one-day permit from MTSU’s Office of Parking and Transportation at http://www.mtsu.edu/parking/visit.php. A searchable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

For more information on the event, contact the Pam Wright Chair of Entrepreneurship at 615-898-2785 or email Stacy.Aaron@mtsu.edu. To learn more about MTSU entrepreneurship program, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/programs/entrepreneurship/.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU’s Rhodes named 2016 Armed Forces Merit Award recipient

FORT WORTH, Texas — U. S. Marine veteran Steven Rhodes, a senior defensive end at Middle Tennessee State University, is the fifth recipient of the Armed Forces Merit Award presented by the Football Writers Association of America, or FWAA.

Steven Rhodes

Steven Rhodes

Coordinated by the staff at the Lockheed Martin Armed Forces Bowl, the Armed Forces Merit Award presented by the FWAA was created in June 2012 “to honor an individual and/or a group within the realm of the sport of football.”

Brant Ringler, the executive director of the Lockheed Martin Armed Forces Bowl, and Steve Richardson, the FWAA’s executive director, announced Friday that Rhodes, who will be 28 in 11 days, as the 2016 recipient during an 9 a.m. teleconference.

MT Veterans Salute logoA seven-person committee made up of FWAA members and Lockheed Martin Armed Forces Bowl officials selected Rhodes from a list of 16 nominations for the 2016 award.

Nate Boyer of the University of Texas was the initial recipient of the award in 2012, followed by Brandon McCoy of the University of North Texas in 2013, Daniel Rodriguez from Clemson University in 2014 and Bret Robertson of Fulton, Missouri’s Westminster College in 2015.

All four were U. S. Army veterans before playing college football.

“On this very special day, Veterans’ Day 2016, we are pleased to join with the Football Writers Association of America to honor Steven Rhodes as the fifth recipient of the Armed Forces Merit Award,” said Ringler.

“We had a list of 16 outstanding nominations for this year’s award and it is difficult to honor only one each year when we have individuals and programs that are very deserving of the honor.”

Click here to read the full story on goblueraiders.com.

MTSU senior football player Steven Rhodes, shown carrying the American flag in this file photo, was named Friday as the 2016 Rhodes 2016 Armed Forces Merit Award recipient. (MTSU photo)

MTSU senior football player Steven Rhodes, shown carrying the American flag in this file photo, was named Friday, Nov. 11, as the 2016 Rhodes 2016 Armed Forces Merit Award recipient. (MTSU photo)

UPDATE: GoFundMe set up for MTSU grad student displaced by fire

UPDATED 11/10/16: A GoFundMe.com account has been established in addition to the previously established fund with Ascend Federal Credit Union to assist Middle Tennessee State University graduate student Eva W. Kibe-Pea, whose family lost everything in a Nashville apartment fire Nov. 3.

Dr. Ron Aday with the MTSU Department of Sociology and Anthropology said the direct deposit Ascend account fund is listed as “Eva K. Pea,” and donations can be made at any Ascend location.

A GoFundMe crowdfunding account has also been recently established and had raised $1,445 toward a $5,000 goal as of Nov. 10. To contribute, click here.MTSU Wordmark

Kibe-Pea, a native of Nairobi, Kenya, is a master’s degree student studying sociology. She earned her bachelor’s degree in sociology earlier this year.

gofundme-logo-web“We are trying to move forward,” Kibe-Pea said of her family after the Nov. 3 fire near Nashboro Village in south Nashville. The family was not home when the mid-afternoon fire broke out in a nearby apartment. All of their furniture and clothing was burned or damaged by water or smoke.

ascend-fcu-logoThe blaze at the apartment complex damaged two or three units, and water damaged several other units, Metro Nashville Fire Department officials told The Tennessean. No one was injured.

The American Red Cross of Nashville has been providing shelter and necessities to the displaced families and assisted in placing the Kibe-Pea family in an area hotel.

“We are looking for a new place to live,” Kibe-Pea said.

For more information, contact Aday at 615-898-2125 or email Ronald.Aday@mtsu.edu.

— Randy Weiler (randy.weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU sorority raising cancer awareness with Think Pink Week

Breast Cancer Awareness Month may have just ended, but that hasn’t stopped one Middle Tennessee State University sorority from continuing to bring attention to a public health concern that has an impact on thousands of families each year.

The ladies of Zeta Tau Alpha are hosting their annual Think Pink Week, which is designed promote breast cancer education and awareness as well as raise donations as a part of the sorority’s philanthropy.

A student stops by the table of MTSU’s Zeta Tau Alpha sorority during its “Kiss Away Cancer” event Wednesday, Nov. 2, in the Student Union atrium. (MTSU photo by Steven Michael Johnson)

A student stops by the table of MTSU’s Zeta Tau Alpha sorority during its “Kiss Away Cancer” event Wednesday, Nov. 2, in the Student Union atrium. (MTSU photo by Steven Michael Johnson)

As a part of the weeklong awareness effort, the sorority hosted its annual “Kiss Away Cancer” event Wednesday, Nov. 2, in the Student Union atrium. People were invited to stop by the Zeta booth where they put on pink lip gloss or lipstick and kissed the sorority’s banner. The sorority also accepted donations and passed out pink ribbons.

ZTA, which plans to hang the banner in front of their sorority house on Greek Row, hopes their events will serve as an invitation for on-campus participation.

“Think Pink” ribbons were passed out by Zeta Tau Alpha sorority.

“It’s for people to be more involved on campus and to get the community involved. Not just our sorority and Greek life, but the entire community,” said junior Emma Graham.

Graham has been involved with Think Pink Week since her freshman year and has high expectations for the turnout this year.

“We don’t really have a particular goal, but I know we were trying to double our goal from last year. We raised $10,000 last year and this year we’re trying to double that,” she said.

A student kisses the breast cancer awareness sign at the “Kiss Away Cancer” event Wednesday, Nov. 2, in the Student Union atrium. Event sponsor Zeta Tau Alpha sorority will hang the sign on their house. (MTSU photo by Steven Michael Johnson)

A student kisses the breast cancer awareness sign at the “Kiss Away Cancer” event Wednesday, Nov. 2, in the Student Union atrium. Event sponsor Zeta Tau Alpha sorority will hang the sign on their house. (MTSU photo by Steven Michael Johnson)

On Thursday, ZTA will also be selling pink shirts for their annual “pink-out” football game, which will be played Saturday, Nov. 5.

On Friday the sorority will host its chalkboard event where the campus community will be invited to write on the organization’s chalkboard and explain who they wear the color pink to honor.

According to sophomore Leah Jones, the entire week has been a rewarding experience and shown a different side to Greek life.

“It’s been really great because a lot of people think of sororities as just glitter and social events, but it’s really nice to know you’re a part of something that gives back to not only your campus, but the community and the people you know personally,” she said.

For more information on Think Pink week, visit www.zetataualpha.org or contact the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life at 615-898-5812.

— Steven Michael Johnson (news@mtsu.edu)

Members of MTSU’s Zeta Tau Alpha sorority held its annual “Kiss Away Cancer” event Wednesday, Nov. 2, in the Student Union atrium as part of its Think Pink Week to raise breast cancer awareness. People were invited to stop by the Zeta booth where they put on pink lip gloss or lipstick and kissed the sorority’s banner. The sorority also accepted donations and passed out pink ribbons. (MTSU photo by Steven Michael Johnson)

Members of MTSU’s Zeta Tau Alpha sorority held its annual “Kiss Away Cancer” event Wednesday, Nov. 2, in the Student Union atrium as part of its Think Pink Week to raise breast cancer awareness. People were invited to stop by the Zeta booth where they put on pink lip gloss or lipstick and kissed the sorority’s banner. The sorority also accepted donations and passed out pink ribbons. (MTSU photo by Steven Michael Johnson)

This sign by MTSU’s Zeta Tau Alpha sorority encourages visitors to its table to "Think Pink" during its “Kiss Away Cancer” event Wednesday, Nov. 2, in the Student Union atrium. (MTSU photo by Steven Michael Johnson)

This sign by MTSU’s Zeta Tau Alpha sorority encourages visitors to its table to “Think Pink” during its “Kiss Away Cancer” event Wednesday, Nov. 2, in the Student Union atrium. (MTSU photo by Steven Michael Johnson)

A student gets a fresh coat of lipstick before participating in the “Kiss Away Cancer” event Wednesday, Nov. 2, in the Student Union atrium. (MTSU photo by Steven Michael Johnson)

A student gets a fresh coat of lipstick before participating in the “Kiss Away Cancer” event Wednesday, Nov. 2, in the Student Union atrium. (MTSU photo by Steven Michael Johnson)

A member of MTSU’s Zeta Tau Alpha sorority passes out pink ribbons during the sorority's annual “Kiss Away Cancer” event Wednesday, Nov. 2, in the Student Union atrium. (MTSU photo by Steven Michael Johnson)

A member of MTSU’s Zeta Tau Alpha sorority passes out pink ribbons during the sorority’s annual “Kiss Away Cancer” event Wednesday, Nov. 2, in the Student Union atrium. (MTSU photo by Steven Michael Johnson)

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