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EMC’s ‘First Look 2016’ gives students screening opportunity

Several students in the MTSU College of Media and Entertainment were given a taste of what their futures in film could possibly hold during a Wednesday, Sept. 21, event in the Student Union Building.

As a part of MT Engage Week, the Department of Electronic Media Communication hosted “First Look 2016: Students on the Verge of an Oscar” inside the Student Union ballroom. MT Engage is the university’s latest Quality Enhancement Plan, or QEP, to promote student involvement on campus and enhance the curriculum.

Attendees watch one of the films screened Wednesday, Sept. 21, during the Department of Electronic Media Communication-hosted “First Look 2016: Students on the Verge of an Oscar” held inside the Student Union ballroom. (MTSU photo by Steven Michael Johnson)

Attendees watch one of the films screened Wednesday, Sept. 21, during the Department of Electronic Media Communication-hosted “First Look 2016: Students on the Verge of an Oscar” held inside the Student Union ballroom. (MTSU photos by Steven Michael Johnson)

For “First Look 2016,” one of a series of events sponsored by various colleges and organizations across campus as part of the first MT Engage Week, a select group of animation, photography, film and video students were able to have their work shown on the big screen in the Student Union Ballroom E.

As noted by some of the students, this was the first time many of them had their films and projects displayed, which is a rewarding experience for the future filmmakers.

This poster welcomed attendees Wednesday, Sept. 21, to the Department of Electronic Media Communication-hosted “First Look 2016: Students on the Verge of an Oscar” held inside the Student Union ballroom. (MTSU photo by Steven Michael Johnson)

This poster welcomed attendees Wednesday, Sept. 21, to the Department of Electronic Media Communication-hosted “First Look 2016: Students on the Verge of an Oscar” held inside the Student Union ballroom.

“Overall this event allows students the chance to see their own work and some of their classmates, which is what we want as filmmakers,” said senior film and video production student Josh Beluit.

“It also shows all the good things happening in the Bragg (Media and Entertainment) Building,”

Dozens of students submit their films to a server throughout the year before a group of five to six EMC faculty members choose which films will be used in the screenings.

The event is very selective, and officials said only 15 percent of submissions are actually used.

Tom Neff

Tom Neff

The students fortunate enough to have their work displayed get a chance to connect with professionals in their industry and have an opportunity to find employment.

“The genesis of this concept was for professionals to see what our students were doing and to get their work out there. Many connections are made here at ‘First Look’ as students showcase their work. Many of our students have gotten hired because of this,” said EMC professor Tom Neff.

Neff helped start the event four years ago and has overseen the event every year. The hourlong showcase featured 30 films and included short films, documentaries and 3-D animation.

For more information on “First Look,” visit http://emcmtsu.com/first-look or contact the Department of Electronic Media Communication at 615-898-5628.

— Steven Michael Johnson (news@mtsu.edu)

A scene from one of the animated films screened Wednesday, Sept. 21, during the Department of Electronic Media Communication-hosted “First Look 2016: Students on the Verge of an Oscar” held inside the Student Union ballroom. (MTSU photo by Steven Michael Johnson)

This photo shows a scene from one of the animated films screened Wednesday, Sept. 21, during the Department of Electronic Media Communication-hosted “First Look 2016: Students on the Verge of an Oscar” held inside the Student Union ballroom. 

 

MTSU initiates recruiting events with Sept. 24, Nov. 5 Fall Preview Days

Middle Tennessee State University will welcome prospective high school students and their families to visit the campus Saturday, Sept. 24, in the first of two Fall Preview Days.

MTSU conducts preview days as a way for prospective students to see the campus, take tours given by student guides, learn about departments, programs and student organizations and meet faculty and staff from academic areas and the Division of Student Affairs.

Kyle Elliot, front left, a former Blue Elite tour guide member, leads an MTSU campus tour past the Student Union and near the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center in this August 2015 file photo. (MTSU file photo by Randy Weiler)

Kyle Elliot, front left, a former Blue Elite tour guide member, leads an MTSU campus tour past the Student Union and near the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center in this August 2015 file photo. (MTSU file photo by Randy Weiler)

To register for any preview day or other special events, visit www.mtsu.edu/schedule-a-visit/special-events.php. Events begin in the Student Union.

To find various buildings and parking, visit http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

In addition to the Sept. 24 preview day, other scheduled campus visit days include Saturday, Nov. 5, and Saturday, March 17, 2017.

Saturday’s preview day includes breakfast, lunch and an option to attend the 6 p.m. MTSU-Louisiana Tech football game.

Campus officials urge students to apply by Dec. 1 in order to be considered for scholarship consideration if they meet ACT score, high school GPA and other academic criteria.

To learn about scholarships, visit http://mtsu.edu/financial-aid/scholarships.

Linda Olsen

Linda Olsen

“We’re really promoting high school seniors to come out and spend the day with us,” said Linda Olsen, director of undergraduate recruitment.

“This will be their first opportunity to get the full celebration and display of departments and campus tour. … It’s a way to have a full day’s experience of what it means to be True Blue and a Blue Raider.”

MTSU also takes the campus on the road with its annual True Blue Tour. Stops will include:

  • Chattanooga, Tennessee, Oct. 4.
  • Atlanta, Georgia, Oct. 5.
  • Huntsville, Alabama, Oct. 11.
  • Johnson City, Tennessee, Oct. 18.
  • Knoxville, Tennessee, Oct. 19.
  • Franklin, Tennessee, Oct. 26.
  • Nashville, Nov. 1.
  • Memphis, Tennessee, Nov. 9.
  • Jackson, Tennessee, Nov. 10.
  • Bowling Green, Kentucky, Nov. 15.
  • Louisville, Kentucky, Nov. 16.

All True Blue Tour student and family receptions will begin at 6 p.m. local time, except for Nashville, which has a 6:30 p.m. start.

MTSU offers daily campus tours at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. every day the university is open, Olsen said. There also will be one other Saturday tour, scheduled for Nov. 19.

Transfer student tours will be held Friday, Oct. 14, and Friday, Nov. 11.

For admissions questions, email admissions@mtsu.edu or call 615-898-2233. For questions about events and tours, email tours@mtsu.edu or call 615-898-5670.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU students can plug into campus life during MT Engage Week

MTSU students can discover ways to be more involved in the campus community through a host of activities to promote MT Engage, the name of the university’s latest Quality Enhancement Plan, or QEP.

The first MT Engage Week features events hosted by several colleges and divisions to bring students a wide array of events and engagement opportunities at MTSU.

Wednesday, Sept. 21, events include:MT Engage logo-web

  • “First Look 2016: Students on the Verge of an Oscar,” 3 p.m., Student Union Ballroom. Come see screenings of exemplary work by MTSU film, video, animation and photography students. Presented by the Department of Electronic Media Communication in the College of Media and Entertainment.
  • Symposium on Gang Violence Reduction, 6:30-8 p.m., Student Union Parliamentary Room. Hosted by the departments of Criminal Justice Administration and Social Work.

Visit the MT Engage website at www.mtsu.edu/mtengage/get_involved.php for the full list of events, including electronic fliers with more information. MT Engage events will run through Thursday, Sept. 29.

Participating students can also win prizes, with students who attend more than one event entered to win an iPad Mini and other prizes.

Dr. Mary S. Hoffschwelle

Dr. Mary S. Hoffschwelle

“We are grateful to the colleges and divisions for their support of our first MT Engage Week,” said Dr. Mary S. Hoffschwelle, a professor of history and director or MT Engage. “Deans, staff, and faculty across the entire campus are showcasing the many ways students can be more involved in their learning and campus life.”

With a motto of “engage academically, learn exponentially, showcase yourself,” MT Engage encourages students to not only think in a more integrative way about their academics but to reflect on their experiences inside and outside of the classroom from the time they set foot on campus. The mission is to create opportunities for students “to become physically and psychologically involved in productive learning activities.”

The QEP is a requirement by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, or SACSCOC, the regional accreditation body for higher education institutions in the South.

A SACSCOC review committee visited campus in late March for a campus assessment of MT Engage, which was developed through an inclusive, comprehensive approach that included input from faculty, administration and staff, as well as students, alumni and community members.

Shakeya Fielder

Shakeya Fielder

Lexy Denton

Lexy Denton

Lexy Denton was recently named assistant director of MT Engage with responsibilities for MT Engage experiences initiatives, student outreach and recognitions, and marketing and communications for the program. Denton was involved in the development of the MT Engage program as assistant to QEP Chair Dr. Dianna Rust and is an MTSU alumna.

Reach her at Alexis.Denton@mtsu.edu or 615-904-8281. Her office is in Walker Library Room 236.

Shakeya Fielder is the secretary for MT Engage and responsible for office management. She previously worked at Health Connect America and Tuskegee University. Reach her at Shakeya.Fielder@mtsu.edu or 615-898-2761. Her office is in Walker Library Room 216.

To learn more about MT Engage, visit www.mtsu.edu/MTEngage.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU recognizes almost 300 high achievers on summer 2016 Dean’s List

Nearly 300 MTSU students are included on the latest Dean’s List for their academic achievements for the summer 2016 semester.

summer 2016 deans list graphicThis list, alphabetized by home county and surname, is the final compilation by the MTSU Records Office of the names and hometowns of students receiving the Dean’s List distinction for the spring.

The searchable PDF is available by clicking here.

To qualify for the Dean’s List, a student must maintain a current semester grade-point average of 3.5 or above and earn at least 12 semester hours.

The “Dean’s List” notation applies only to undergraduate students. MTSU’s lists are updated after each semester ends and student grades are posted.

An archive of recent Dean’s Lists by semester is available here.

Please note: This updated Dean’s List information is provided by the MTSU Registrar’s Office and is compiled from information from each student’s official records. The Office of News and Media Relations does not compile nor create the final Dean’s List.

For questions about an individual student’s inclusion on the list, please contact the Registrar’s Office at 615-898-5170 or records@mtsu.edu.

MTSU Records Office provides final list of summer 2016 graduates

MTSU is proud to release a printable list of the graduates who received their degrees in the summer 2016 commencement ceremonies.

A newly minted MTSU graduate celebrates, hard-earned degree in hand, on the stage at Murphy Center during the university’s summer 2016 commencement ceremony Saturday, Aug. 6. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

A newly minted MTSU graduate celebrates, hard-earned degree in hand, on the stage at Murphy Center during the university’s summer 2016 commencement ceremony Aug. 6. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

This list, alphabetized by home county and surname, is the final compilation by the MTSU Registrar’s Office of the names and hometowns of MTSU’s summer 2016 graduates. The PDF is available by clicking here.

Full news coverage of the summer 2016 commencement ceremonies on Aug. 6, including videos and links to plenty of photos, is available here

MTSU graduation lists are finalized after each commencement day. An archive of recent graduation lists by semester is available here.

Please note: These final graduation lists are provided by the MTSU Registrar’s Office and are compiled from information from each student’s official records. The Office of News and Media Relations does not compile nor create the final graduation list.

For questions about an individual student’s inclusion on the list, please contact the Registrar’s Office at 615-898-5170 or records@mtsu.edu.

MTSU’s free tutoring focuses on study skills, student success

As MTSU’s fall semester moves into Week 2, school officials aren’t just stressing to students the importance of study time to their overall academic success. The university is enhancing its free tutoring and offering workshops that outline how to study.

MTSU academic administrators discovered students — particularly recent high school graduates — did not know how to study, said Dr. Cornelia Wills, director in the Office of Student Success.

MTSU junior accounting student Jonathan Adams, left, receives tutoring assistance from graduate student Victor Barnes in the Business and Aerospace Building's accounting lab. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU junior accounting student Jonathan Adams, left, receives tutoring assistance from graduate student Victor Barnes in the Business and Aerospace Building’s accounting lab. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

Starting Monday, Aug. 29, and through the entire semester, tutoring will be available at the Tutoring Spot on the first floor of the James E. Walker Library and other campus venues.

“If students don’t know how to study, they’re going to struggle,” said Wills, who credits Walker Library Dean Bonnie Allen for the centralized tutoring concept.

After conducting a pilot, the library implemented tutoring in 2013.

In addition to study skills and learning strategies, tutoring will be available for more than 180 courses, including biology, history, math, computer information systems, recording industry, physics and more.

This initiative is driven by the ongoing Quest for Student Success, a comprehensive, strategic initiative to improve retention and completion rates.

“To be successful and improve the retention and graduation rates for all of our students, we needed to enhance our overall initiative,” Wills added.

A spring 2016 study revealed tutoring had a significant and positive impact on students compared to a matched sample of those who did not receive tutoring.

Peers will serve as tutors for  struggling or potentially struggling students. Preparing for the Aug. 29 start, about 160 student tutors met for two hours of training Aug. 27.

Four major areas critical to studying and learning include:

  • Time management.
  • Note-taking, including during lectures and while reading.
  • Where and when to study.
  • Memory and learning principles.
Junior tutor Jaylon Britt takes sophomore Raven Beverley's student ID card to scan at the Tutoring Spot in Walker Library. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Junior tutor Jaylon Britt takes sophomore Raven Beverley’s student ID card to scan at the Tutoring Spot in MTSU’s James E. Walker Library. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

The fall semester tutoring sessions for study skills and learning strategies at the Tutoring Spot will be held:

  • 1 to 5 p.m. each Monday, with the exception of Sept. 5, the Labor Day holiday.
  • 3 to 6 p.m. Tuesdays.
  • 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesdays.
  • 3 to 6 p.m. Thursdays.

“We are fortunate to have an expert and veteran in the area of study skills and learning strategies that has agreed to conduct the sessions,” Wills said.

For accountability purposes, all participating students must swipe their MTSU ID cards when entering each tutoring session.

The Office for Student Success also offers free online tutoring in at least 11 disciplines, including math, Spanish, chemistry and accounting, through http://services.smarthinking.com.

It also features an online “Road Map for Success” at www.mtsu.edu/studentsuccess/roadmap.php. Topics range from “Neat Stuff for Students” to “Academic Support” to “The Scholarly Scoop.”

For more information, call 615-494-8650 or visit www.mtsu.edu/studentsuccess.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU, 60 schools recruit students at Rutherford County College Night

Area high school students, their parents and families are invited to attend the upcoming Rutherford County College Night — one of the first college recruiting fairs in the Middle Tennessee region this fall.

The event, hosted by MTSU, features nearly 60 colleges and universities from across the Southeast. It will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 7, in the Student Union Ballroom, 1768 MTSU Blvd., on the MTSU campus in Murfreesboro. For general information, visit www.mtsu.edu/rccn.

Rutherford County College Night will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 7, in the Student Union Building Ballroom. (MTSU file photo by Randy Weiler)

Rutherford County College Night will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 7, in the Student Union Building Ballroom. (MTSU file photo by Randy Weiler)

Anyone planning to attend should park in the Rutherford lot off Rutherford Boulevard on the east side of campus. Shuttles will transport visitors to the Student Union Building and return them when they leave. To find parking and building location, a printable campus map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Students from Rutherford and surrounding counties are welcome to attend.

Along with MTSU personnel, dozens of colleges and universities will send representatives in their effort to recruit students for the 2017-18 academic year and beyond.

“This year, we will be an automated fair,” said Joey Clark, an admissions recruiter who now works with Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties after previously recruiting Shelby County students.

Students can register at www.gotocollegefairs.com. After registering, the student will be provided a printable barcode or one that can be utilized from their phone. This will allow college recruiters to scan the student’s barcode and instantly receive all necessary information.

“Ultimately, this takes the place of contact cards and truly saves a great deal of time for the students and families,” Clark said. “It allows students to optimize their time with recruiters face to face.”

TACRAO logoKristen Russell, senior admissions counselor, said the event allows area high school students to efficiently maximize interactions with multiple schools, which is ideal for any student in their college search process.

For questions about the event, call 615-898-2233 or email admissions@mtsu.edu.

The Tennessee Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers endorse the event.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Eighteen new cadets join MTSU ROTC program at swearing-in ceremony

MTSU’s military science program ushered in the fall 2016 semester with a brief but formal swearing-in ceremony as 18 newly contracted students took the oath Friday, Aug. 19, on campus after passing their physical training exercise Aug. 18.

Part of the group of 18 newly contracted cadets take the oath during the fall 2016 ROTC swearing-in ceremony Aug. 19 at MTSU. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Part of the group of 18 newly contracted cadets take the oath during the fall 2016 ROTC swearing-in ceremony Aug. 19 at MTSU. (MTSU photos by Andy Heidt)

“New cadets take the oath to support and defend the Constitution of the United States, which, at their age, is very impressive,” said U.S. Army Lt. Col. Jackie McDowell, who leads the program and administered the oath to the 18- to 21-year-olds.

“It’s significant that our nation has been at war since they were 5 years old. They took an oath knowing at some point they will be deployed and be in harm’s way.”

New cadets include:

  • Terrah Black of Clarksville, Tennessee.
  • Anthony Burton of Jackson, Michigan.
  • Chance Cunningham of Franklin, Tennessee
  • Bryce DeLozier of Dalton, Georgia.
  • John Gibbons of Pleasant View, Tennessee.
  • Benjamin Gober of Gadsden, Alabama.
  • Antonio Hiles of Wartrace, Tennessee.
  • Daryl Jackson of Memphis, Tennessee.
  • Nicholas King of Nolensville, Tennessee.
  • Christian Moskovitz of Memphis.
  • Sydney Moskovitz of Tampa, Florida.
  • Jonathan Nunley of Winchester, Tennessee.
  • Allison Perkins of Gallatin, Tennessee.
  • Devin Pope of Chattanooga, Tennessee.
  • Bryce Teague of Franklin, Tennessee.
  • Brandon Valentin of Smyrna, Tennessee.
  • Seth Whitehead of Tullahoma, Tennessee.
  • Thomas Wiseman of Murfreesboro.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

U.S. Army Lt. Col. Jackie McDowell, front, swears in 18 new ROTC cadets during the fall 2016 military science swearing-in ceremony Aug. 19 on campus. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

U.S. Army Lt. Col. Jackie McDowell, at left, faces 18 new ROTC cadets to administer their oath of enlistment during the fall 2016 military science swearing-in ceremony Aug. 19 on campus.

MTSU solar boat soars to second in world once again [+VIDEO]

Maybe the third time will be the national championship charm for MTSU at the 2017 Solar Splash World Championship.

For the second straight year, MTSU finished No. 2 and earned a number of awards in the 23rd Solar Splash World Championship of Intercollegiate Solar Boating at Eastwood Park in Dayton, Ohio, earlier this summer.

Solar Splash is an intercollegiate solar and electric competition dedicated to showing the feasibility of solar energy. Teams come from across the country to compete.

The crafts are powered by designated batteries and solar arrays and must maintain a height of 1.5 meters above the water line at all times. Competitive teams must showcase hydro dynamically effective designs that utilize solar power effectively.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aHXukSw1CHM

MTSU finished runner-up to Cedarville University and ahead of third-place University of South Carolina. The top five included fourth-place University of New Mexico and The College of New Jersey, which placed fifth.For all results, visit http://solarsplash.com/2016-event/.

Pilot David Sprouls guides the MTSU entry in the 2016 Solar Splash competition to a first place in qualifying and second in sprint (the speed of the boat). (Submitted photos)

Pilot David Sprouls guides the MTSU entry in the 2016 Solar Splash competition to a first place in qualifying and second in sprint. (Submitted photos)

In addition to second overall, Solar Splash team awards MTSU received included:

  • First in qualifying.
  • Second in sprint (speed of the boat).
  • Outstanding workmanship.
  • Third in Visual Display.

All teams received a plaque for entering and competing.

The 2016 MTSU Solar Boat Team members included Cary Woodson, Matthew Ham, Syed Bukhari, Colton Adcock, Michael Raymond, Lindsey Blankenship, David Sprouls, Mikhail Milton Ault-Normandie, Kelly Maynard and James “Sam” Fassnacht.

Dr. Saeed Foroudastan, associate dean in the College of Basic and Applied Sciences, serves as faculty adviser for all Experimental Vehicles Program projects in engineering technology. These include the solar boat, lunar rover, formula hybrid and Baja Society of Automotive Engineers, or SAE, collegiate design series.

Foroudastan praised Woodson and Blankenship “without whose heart and dedication the solar boat (success) would not have come to fruition.” He congratulated the entire team “for their contributions and the dedication to the success of this project” and for the well-deserved honors.

For more information about the program, call 615-494-8786 or email Foroudastan at Saeed.Foroudastan@mtsu.edu.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU team members receive one of a number of awards presented by a Solar Splash official during the 2016 competition held near Dayton, Ohio.

MTSU team members receive one of a number of awards presented by a Solar Splash official during the 2016 competition held near Dayton, Ohio.

MTSU team members are shown with their 2016 solar boat, which placed second overall in the competition held at Dayton, Ohio.

MTSU team members are shown with their 2016 solar boat, which placed second overall.

The MTSU solar boat team collected a number of awards including first place in Outstanding Workmanship and first place in qualifying.

The MTSU solar boat team collected a number of awards including first place in Outstanding Workmanship and first place in qualifying.

 

Local students see fruits of their ‘Project Seed’ research [+VIDEO]

Two Rutherford County high school students, Helene Hamo and Edgar Lozano, are seeing the results from their MTSU “Project SEED” research efforts this summer.

Hamo, a Stewarts Creek High School senior, and Lozano, a senior at Central Magnet School, worked in the program under the guidance of MTSU Department of Chemistry chair Greg Van Patten and graduate and undergraduate students.

https://youtu.be/H2f-dRFXT0g

Project SEED, or Summer Education Experience for the Economically Disadvantaged, is a research program that gives high school juniors and seniors an opportunity to work with scientist-mentors on research projects in industrial, academic and federal laboratories.

The American Chemical Society and the National Science Foundation sponsor the program.

“They’ve made really great progress,” said Van Patten. “They’ve been taking semiconductor quantum dots that are known and have certain kinds of interesting properties and trying to change those properties by introducing new materials into them through a new kind of chemical reaction: a cation.”

Project SEED students Helene Hamo, left, and Edgar Lozano, seated front, observe as MTSU graduate student Alex Morris adjusts equipment before they resume their research project Aug. 2 in an MTSU Science Building research lab. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

Project SEED students Helene Hamo, left, and Edgar Lozano, seated front, observe as MTSU graduate student Alex Morris adjusts equipment before they resume their research project Aug. 2 in an MTSU Science Building research lab. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

Cations are atoms that have lost electrons.

Van Patten said experts have known for some time that cadmium could be exchanged with silver in tiny quantities and expensive reagents, “and these guys (Hamo and Lozano) found a way to scale that up to large quantities with cheap reagents.”

The pair, who each received a $2,500 fellowship, finished their two-month research endeavor Aug. 4. Their mentors also included chemistry graduate students Alex Morris and Ryan Tilluck and senior biochemistry major Ron Higdon.

Project SEED logo72Lozano, 16, called their summer a fun experience where they enjoyed doing new things.

“We’ve learned a lot about safety in the lab,” Lozano said. “Then we also learned how to keep up with lab notebooks to keep our research, to keep a current record of everything we do.”

For Hamo, 17, it “has been a really unique experience and I’ve learned a lot.”

“I’ve had really great people teaching me in the beginning, and then we were kind of led off on our own,” she added. “This is definitely a much bigger scale than it is in high school. And I’ve learned lots of new terms and lots of new things.”

To learn about Project SEED opportunities for 2017, call Van Patten at 615-898-2956 or email Greg.VanPatten@mtsu.edu.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Project SEED students Edgar Lozano, left, and Helene Hamo listen as mentor and MTSU Department of Chemistry chair Greg Van Patten explains a research process Aug. 2 in a Science Building laboratory.

Project SEED students Edgar Lozano, left, and Helene Hamo listen as mentor and MTSU Department of Chemistry chair Greg Van Patten explains a research process Aug. 2 in a Science Building laboratory.

Central Magnet School senior Edgar Lozano, left, watches as Stewarts Creek senior Helene Hamo prepares a sample while conducting research Aug. 2 in the MTSU Science Building lab. The two Project SEED students spent two months conducting research.

Central Magnet School senior Edgar Lozano, left, watches as Stewarts Creek senior Helene Hamo prepares a sample while conducting research Aug. 2 in the MTSU Science Building lab. The two Project SEED students spent two months conducting research.