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MTSU Experimental Vehicles Program earns national recognition

The Middle Tennessee State University Experimental Vehicles Program has received national acclaim with the 2016 Clips & Clamps Industries Educational Institution Award from the Precision Metalforming Association.

MTSU Experimental Vehicles Program adviser Saeed Foroudastan, left, accepts the 2016 Clips & Clamps Industries Educational Institution Award from company president Jeffery Aznavorian. (Submitted photo)

MTSU Experimental Vehicles Program adviser Saeed Foroudastan, left, accepts the 2016 Clips & Clamps Industries Educational Institution Award from company president Jeffery Aznavorian. (Submitted photo)

The Department of Engineering Technology program, which gives students extensive hands-on experience by creating and assembling vehicles to compete in collegiate competitions, earned the organization’s sole educational recognition in its Awards of Excellence in Metalforming.

Dr. Saeed Foroudastan, adviser for the program and associate dean in the College of Basic and Applied Sciences, accepted the award and a $1,500 grant in Las Vegas, Nevada, from Jeffery Aznavorian, president of Clips & Clamps.

“This is a very prestigious award because Precision Metalforming Association is a nationwide organization with more than 900 member companies and represents $137 billion of the metal forming industry in North America,” Foroudastan said.

MTSU students in the EVP program “are devoted to excellence and working as team members to prepare their projects for competition,” Foroudastan added.

The program includes four experimental vehicle projects that divide students into peer-led teams, where they must research, design and manufacture original vehicles. On average, 70 to 80 students per semester participate in the program.

Students use the skills they gain from the program, including problem-solving, innovation and resourcefulness, in their careers in the metal forming industry.

Engineering Technology logoForoudastan said students learn valuable job functions, including tensile forming and bending and shearing, and are exposed to fabricating machinery while they manufacture and develop the experimental vehicles.

Students in the program also must present their design reports and technical work, which allows them to learn communication skills alongside their technical expertise.

MTSU’s NASA lunar rover team placed first nationally and third in an international competition, earning the Safety Award and Neil Armstrong Outstanding Design Award in 2015. That year, the MTSU solar boat team placed second in the nation and earned Outstanding Workmanship, Outstanding Electrical System Design and Outstanding Drive Train awards.

More than 90 percent of MTSU engineering technology students involved with experimental vehicles have a job lined up in the metal forming industry when they graduate or soon thereafter, Foroudastan said, adding that the students are in demand by metal forming industry recruiters because they need less training and have more knowledge and problem-solving ability learned in the program.

The MTSU program receives financial support and mentoring from companies in the industry.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU lunar rover drivers Zack Hill, left, and Nichole Wanamaker pedal toward the finish line at the NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge in Huntsville, Ala., in this April 2015 file photo. MTSU placed third in international competition and was best in the U.S. (Submitted photo)

MTSU lunar rover drivers Zack Hill, left, and Nichole Wanamaker pedal toward the finish line at the NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge in Huntsville, Ala., in this April 2015 file photo. MTSU placed third in international competition and was best in the United States at the event. (Submitted photo)

MTSU students urged to attend MT Engage portfolio workshop March 21

MTSU students have a golden opportunity to learn more about how to maximize the MT Engage e-portfolio process by attending a March 21 workshop on campus.

Entitled “The Portfolio Process,” the free workshop begins at 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 21, in Room 160 of the College of Education Building. Light refreshments will be served at 5:30 p.m.

The presentation will be given by Dr. Melissa Peet, director of integrative learning and knowledge management at the University of Michigan’s Stephen M. Ross School of Business.

Dr. Melissa Peet

Dr. Melissa Peet

Dr. Mary S. Hoffschwelle

Dr. Mary Hoffschwelle

Peet, who has worked with a variety of higher education, nonprofit and business institutions, has conducted research that focuses on understanding the types of knowledge and learning methods that support students in becoming effective leaders, entrepreneurs and change agents.

MT Engage, the university’s latest Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) to improve student learning, encourages students to not only think in a more integrative way about their academics but to reflect on their experiences inside and outside of the classroom from the time they set foot on campus.

MT Engage logo-webThe motto of MT Engage is “engage academically, learn exponentially, showcase yourself.” A key aspect of the initiative is an e-Portfolio created by students throughout their academic careers that will serve as an important tool for students in marketing themselves toward a career or graduate degree.

“We are very excited to bring Dr. Peet to campus because her work at the University of Michigan was one of the models for MT Engage,” said Dr. Mary Hoffschwelle, faculty fellow director of MT Engage and a history professor. “Students who come to her presentation will acquire new tools for meaningful learning that they can apply in their classes and toward their professional development.”

Peet’s presentation will show students how they can: distinguish between different types of knowledge and learning and identify how these affect day-to-day life; ask questions to tap their own and others’ hidden sources of strength, passion and purpose; and document their purpose, strengths and learning in ways to showcase their abilities and increase employability.

The presentation is being sponsored by the Distinguished Lecture Fund, Jennings A. Jones College of Business, College of Education, Office of Student Success, and MT Engage.

The QEP is a requirement by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, or SACSCOC, the regional accreditation body for higher education institutions in the South.

For more information about MT Engage, visit mtsu.edu/mtengage, email mtengage@mtsu.edu or call 615-904-8281.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU students getting the message about April 3-14 priority registration

Last fall, MTSU students received a friendly reminder from McCallie Dining and Raider Zone cashiers and servers that it was time to register for spring semester classes.

Those same smiling faces may be at it again as it’s almost time for students to register for summer 2017 and fall 2018 classes.

MT Dining cashier June Campbell, left, checks with a trio of MTSU students, asking if they have taken care of their priority registration, which runs Nov. 15-18.

MT Dining’s June Campbell, left, and other cashiers, food service personnel and academic advisers will pitch summer and fall class priority registration, which runs April 3-14, to MTSU students. (MTSU file photo by Randy Weiler)

Priority registration will be April 3-14. Students can access the current MTSU Registration Guide here.

“Dining staff were so helpful last year; they were professional, collegial and their assistance is much appreciated,” said Dr. Rick Sluder, vice provost for student success and dean of the University College.

“We have received several comments from colleagues from across the country about the work going on at MTSU to involve all areas of campus to change the culture about the importance of early registration for the next semester,” Sluder added. “They especially appreciated our engagement of dining staff in this endeavor.”

Sluder said other methods of providing friendly reminders about registration include university residence halls staff, advisers and digital signage in advising centers and the James E. Walker Library.

Tyler Henson, assistant director in the Scheduling Center in the Student Services and Admissions Center, said priority registration for summer and fall is crucial for currently enrolled students because they can register ahead of thousands of new incoming first-year and transfer students.

“Those who wait risk losing their seats as early as the Monday after priority registration, when the new students can register for summer courses,” Henson said, “so it’s in their best interest to register at their assigned time and not wait until August, or even May, to sign up for fall classes.”

Dr. Richard Sluder

Dr. Richard Sluder

Advisers have been working since the fall 2016 semester began to help students prioritize having a plan, mapping their degree progress and staying on track, Sluder said.

“Part of this educational process is to encourage students to get their courses set by taking advantage of priority registration,” he added. “MTSU’s complete focus on the student, keeping them on track and facilitating their success, is what has made a difference and brought the university national prominence.”

Sluder said MTSU makes a special effort to inform students about summer classes  because they can enroll in summer 2017 classes when they enroll for fall 2018.

Organizers will provide a variety of giveaways, including fans, flying discs, T-shirts and cups, all containing summer school messaging.

“Students who attend summer school have higher rates of degree completion and finish their degrees quicker than students who do not attend summer,” Sluder said.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

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New fitness room at Rec Center gives more focus to intense workouts

The new functional fitness room has recently opened in the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center on campus to give students, faculty and staff a more private and concentrated focus during their workout.

The new room at the Rec is open from 8 a.m. to noon and from 1 to 4 p.m. Monday–Friday, and it features a more private and updated environment so students can concentrate on body-focused workouts.

Lindsay Joyce, fitness coordinator in the new Functional Fitness Room inside the MTSU Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center, demonstrates how to use the TRX equipment for suspension training. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

Lindsay Joyce, fitness coordinator in the new Functional Fitness Room inside the MTSU Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center, demonstrates how to use the TRX equipment for suspension training. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

The room has a turf and weightlifting section, squat racks, bumper plates, kettlebells, TRX equipment used for suspension training and box platforms.

Lindsay Joyce, the fitness coordinator, wants to encourage participants to get out of their comfort zone and branch into different styles of training.

“TRX is a suspension training bodyweight exercise where the participant uses his/her own bodyweight to develop strength, balance, flexibility and core strength all at the same time,” Joyce said. “Since it uses your bodyweight and gravity, it can be modified for all fitness levels. We want members to have a fun and safe environment, but also have the ability to train hard and be healthy.”

The functional fitness room allows members to perform a variety of Olympic-style lifts of use their body weight with a variety of equipment much different from the original weight room.

“The fitness room is something new that I like,” MTSU senior Darius Gallaher said. “It gives me the freedom to do the workouts I want to do without feeling restricted by outdated equipment.”

With a high energy and welcoming environment, the functional fitness room has more flexibility to create more short circuit, interval, and agility training sessions that allow students to maximize their fitness potential.

In order to use the room, you must be a member of the Rec or have some affiliation with MTSU. All students have memberships that are included with their tuition. Faculty and staff also have free memberships and can purchase membership access for family, Alumni are also able to purchase memberships.

For more information about the functional fitness room, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/camprec/fitness/Functionalfitness.php, or contact Lindsay Joyce at Lindsay.Joyce@mtsu.edu.

— Faith Few (news@mtsu.edu)

MTSU business major Darius Gallaher works out in the new Functional Fitness Room inside the MTSU Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU business major Darius Gallaher works out in the new Functional Fitness Room inside the MTSU Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

Get a closer look at MTSU during upcoming Spring Preview Days

Middle Tennessee State University will host hundreds of prospective students and their families Saturday, March 18, for the first of two Spring Preview Days on campus.

MTSU holds preview days as a way for prospective students to see the campus, take tours given by student guides, learn about departments, programs and student organizations and meet faculty and staff from academic areas and Student Affairs.

Transfer students visiting MTSU listen as Emilie Hendren, second from left, a public relations major, informs them about the James E. Walker Library's many features. (MTSU photos by Eric Sutton)

Virtually all MTSU campus tours include a stop in the James E. Walker Library. (MTSU file photo by Eric Sutton)

To register for any preview day or other special events, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/schedule-a-visit/special-events.php. Preview Day events begin in the Student Union Building, 1768 MTSU Blvd. To find various buildings and parking, visit http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

The second preview day will be Saturday, May 13.

MTSU admissions officials want prospective students and their families to enjoy the full campus experience during preview days. Visit http://www.mtsu.edu/schedule-a-visit/docs/Preview-Day-Agenda.pdf for the complete schedule that begins with the 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. check-in and registration in the Student Union lobby.

For questions about the admissions process, email admissions@mtsu.edu or call 615-898-2233.

For questions about special events and tours, email tours@mtsu.edu or call 615-898-5670. Daily campus tours begin at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

In late March, admissions staff and recruiters will begin holding the first of seven Paint Your Future True Blue events at community colleges across Tennessee.

The community college visits include Pellissippi State (March 28) in Knoxville; Nashville State (April 4); Vol State (April 5) in Gallatin; Jackson State (April 6); Motlow State (April 11) in Lynchburg; Chattanooga State (April 13); and Motlow State (April 19) in Smyrna.

All of the community college events will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. local time. No registration is required.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Kyle Elliot, front left, a former Blue Elite tour guide member, leads an MTSU campus tour past the Student Union and near the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center in this file photo. (MTSU file photo by Randy Weiler)

Kyle Elliot, front left, a former Blue Elite tour guide member, leads an MTSU campus tour past the Student Union and near the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center in this file photo. (MTSU file photo by Randy Weiler)

‘MTSU On the Record’ guest links movement to learning for youngsters

Incorporating more physical activity into youngsters’ classroom work is the topic of the next “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Holly Huddleston

Holly Huddleston

Host Gina Logue’s interview with MTSU doctoral student Holly Huddleston first aired March 7 on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org. You can listen to their conversation below.

WMOT-new web logoHuddleston, along with assistant professor Vaughn Barry and professor Jennifer Caputo of MTSU’s Department of Health and Human Performance, conducted a study in which 33 children in second, third and fourth grades wore electronic armbands to monitor their energy expenditure during academic activities.

The researchers found that the kids put more physical energy into science than language arts, math, art or music. They also found that finding ways to put more movement into academic activities can have physical, cognitive and behavioral benefits.

The study, “School Day Energy Expenditure in Elementary School Children,” was published in the September 2016 edition of the Journal of Physical Activity and Health. You can read a PDF of the study here.

“All the dimensions of wellness are very much intertwined,” said Huddleston. “Our cognitive health, our physical health, our emotional health and our social health — they all affect each other. And for us to focus on one but not be aware that it affects the other is a little bit neglectful.”

Huddleston, who lives in Nashville, Tennessee, is a health fitness specialist with the American College of Sports Medicine and has been a first aid and CPR instructor since 1997.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or gina.logue@mtsu.edu.

Students urged to complete survey about campus life before March 13 deadline

MTSU administrators are urging students to take advantage of the opportunity to share their thoughts about the overall campus environment by participating in an online survey seeking to capture their opinions.

The “Campus Climate Survey” can be accessed through a student’s university email account and can be completed up until the Monday, March 13, deadline.MTSU Wordmark

The university has partnered with outside vendor Campus Answers to conduct the survey in order to ensure the anonymity and validity of the responses.

Students have been invited to complete the survey via multiple email notifications in recent weeks that include a link to the online survey.

Questions include how welcome students feel on campus, if they feel that the campus is inclusive in both on-campus social settings, such as clubs, organizations and other extracurricular activities, as well as in academic settings.

MTSU will use the survey results to promote awareness, provide education and training and improve policies and opportunities to enhance our community.

Students pass between the buildings on the east side of the MTSU campus, including the Business and Aerospace Building, the College of Education building, the new Student Union, the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building and the John Bragg Mass Communication Building. In the distance construction continues on the new Student Services Building and parking garage next to the Health, Wellness, and Recreation Center. (MTSU file photo by Andy Heidt)

Students pass between the buildings on the east side of the MTSU campus, including the Business and Aerospace Building, the College of Education building, the new Student Union, the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building and the John Bragg Mass Communication Building. In the distance construction continues on the new Student Services Building and parking garage next to the Health, Wellness, and Recreation Center. (MTSU file photo by Andy Heidt)

Anderson Center grants will fund scholarships, sexual assault education

With two new grants in hand, an MTSU center will be better able to serve nontraditional students and change the conversation about gender-based violence.

MTSU representatives celebrate the receipt of a $10,000 check from the Avon Foundation for Women to institute a prevention and response plan to combat gender-based violence on campus. From left to right are Quianda Stanley, counselor, MTSU Counseling and Testing Services; Barbara Scales, director, June Anderson Center for Women and Nontraditional Students; Christine Jaworsky, director, Avon Foundation for Women; Abbigail Tracy, at-large senator, Student Government Association; Amy Dean, MTSU sexual assault and intervention liaison; and Marian Wilson, assistant to the president for institutional equity and compliance and Title IX coordinator. (Photo submitted)

MTSU representatives celebrate the receipt of a $10,000 check from the Avon Foundation for Women to institute a prevention and response plan to combat gender-based violence on campus. From left to right are Quianda Stanley, counselor, MTSU Counseling and Testing Services; Barbara Scales, director, June Anderson Center for Women and Nontraditional Students; Christine Jaworsky, director, Avon Foundation for Women; Abbigail Tracy, at-large senator, Student Government Association; Amy Dean, MTSU sexual assault and intervention liaison; and Marian Wilson, assistant to the president for institutional equity and compliance and Title IX coordinator. (Photo submitted)

The June Anderson Center for Women and Nontraditional Students has received a $50,000 grant from the Crankstart Foundation to provide financial aid to students between the ages of 25 and 50 who are returning to college after at least five years away from campus.

These scholarships are available to full-time students regardless of GPA or gender. Each recipient could obtain up to $5,000 per academic year.

“It’s going to give our nontraditional students the assistance that they need,” said center director Barbara Scales. “Hopefully, we’ll be able to give away 14 of these scholarships.

To apply for the Crankstart scholarship or any other financial aid from the June Anderson Center, submit an application at www.mtsu.edu/jac/scholarships.php by April 24.

Crankstart, a nonprofit organization, was founded by Palo Alto, California-based venture capitalist Michael Moritz and his wife, Harriet Heyman, in 2000. As signatories to The Giving Pledge, Moritz and Heyman promised to give more than half of their wealth to charity.

Other billionaires who signed The Giving Pledge include business media magnate and former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg; Facebook creator Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan; and Berkshire Hathaway founder Warren Buffett.

The Avon Foundation for Women gave the June Anderson Center a one-year, $10,000 grant to participate in its inaugural National Leadership Institute: Changing the Narrative on Campus Gender-Based Violence.

MTSU is one of only 20 schools in the nation to receive this grant.

June Anderson Center logo webUniversity representatives attended an institute in Atlanta Nov. 30- Dec. 1 to learn and share best practices to combat gender-based violence and to develop a sexual assault prevention and response action plan.

“We’ve hired two students to help us with our social media campaign around bystander education and around gender-based violence, which is stalking, dating sexual assault, intimate partner violence and domestic violence,” said Scales.

She added that part of the grant will be used to create a video to train students how to respond if they suspect an act of sexual violence might be imminent and to reject the tendency to remain uninvolved.

For more information, contact the June Anderson Center at 615-898-5812 or jacwns@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU construction, concrete students eye internships via fast process

From 19-year-old sophomores Nija Threat and Riley Bethmann to 61-year-old senior Dan Throneberry, nearly 60 MTSU School of Concrete and Construction Management students of all ages participated in the Speed Interviewing Day for internships with industry partners.

Companies from across the South and Midwest sent representatives to interview 45 Concrete Industry Management and 12 construction management students Thursday (March 2) in the James Union Building’s Tennessee Room.

MTSU senior Concrete Industry Management major Chase Phillips, left, of Roswell, Ga., shakes hands with the Wirtgen Group’s Hunter Harber, right, as Josh Wilson, center, and Jeff Johnson watch. Phillips was wrapping up his six-minute speed interview with the company March 2 in the James Union Building’s Tennessee Room. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

MTSU senior Concrete Industry Management major Chase Phillips, left, of Roswell, Ga., shakes hands with the Wirtgen Group’s Hunter Harber, right, as Josh Wilson, center, and Jeff Johnson watch. Phillips was wrapping up his six-minute speed interview with the company March 2 in the James Union Building’s Tennessee Room. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

School of Concrete and Construction Management marketing coordinator Nicole Green schedules sessions such as this to help MTSU students land summer internships and gain interview experience for possible full-time employment.

“It’s gone exceptionally well,” Green said. “This will result in a lot of internships for the summer.”

Threat, a sophomore from Chattanooga, Tennessee, called the six-minute sessions with 20 company reps awesome.

“I have been offered so many opportunities,” Threat said. “It strengthens you for interviews. It shows you your flaws. You sit with different people. Nobody has the same demeanor. … No one here is not going to get an internship or a job.”

Throneberry, who owns his own construction company but returned to college to earn a concrete degree, called it “an eye-opening experience.”

“These people (in industry) are excited about what MTSU is providing,” Throneberry, who expects to graduate with his CIM degree in 2018, said of the quality of students the program is producing. “And it makes so much sense.”

St. Louis, Missouri-based Breckenridge Material Co., the Wirtgen Group, Blue Dot Readi-Mix of Charlotte, North Carolina and Votorantim Cimentos/Prestige Concrete Products of Orlando, Florida, and Bridgeview, Illinois, were among the companies represented at the event.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU junior Todzzja Doty of Memphis, Tenn., responds to questions about her MTSU Concrete Industry Management experience from Austin Walker, left, and Lyle Boardman, who work for Blue Dot Readi-Mix in Charlotte, N.C. The exchange occurred March 2 during the MTSU School of Concrete and Construction Speed Interviewing Day for internship opportunities.

MTSU junior Todazja Doty of Memphis, Tenn., responds to questions about her MTSU Concrete Industry Management experience from Austin Walker, left, and Lyle Boardman, who work for Blue Dot Readi-Mix in Charlotte, N.C. The exchange occurred March 2 during the MTSU School of Concrete and Construction Speed Interviewing Day for internship opportunities.

Logan Thigpen, right, an MTSU junior from Murfreesboro, receives advice from MTSU senior Everett Dunlap of Knoxville, Tenn., as Breckenridge Material Co. recruiters Ryan Bohon and Barb Palmer listen. Breckenridge has hired Dunlap to work full time. Thigpen is seeking an internship.

Logan Thigpen, right, an MTSU junior from Murfreesboro, receives advice from MTSU senior Everett Dunlap of Knoxville, Tenn., as Breckenridge Material Co. recruiters Ryan Bohon and Barb Palmer listen. Breckenridge has hired Dunlap to work full time. Thigpen is seeking an internship.

Horse expo at Miller Coliseum gives MTSU grad student hands-on work

The Southern Equine Expo returned to the Tennessee Miller Coliseum for the fifth year last weekend, continuing its mission to improve the care of horses through the education of their owners.

According to its website, the expo has built its reputation by bringing high quality clinics, educational seminars and hands-on demonstrations all taught by nationally and internationally known horse enthusiasts.

Robyn Stewart

Robyn Stewart

The event not only brings educational opportunities to the Murfreesboro area, but it also gives MTSU students like Robyn Stewart the chance to become immersed into the horse industry through paid experience.

“I enjoy working at the expo because if you come in with an open mind, everyone has the opportunity to learn something new,” said Stewart, who is pursuing her graduate studies degree in horse science. She helped with ring set-up, and she announced clinicians to the audiences in the lower level arenas during the Feb. 24-26 expo.

Michael Gascon, a competitor in the colt starting challenge, is shown at the Southern Equine Expo held Feb. 24-26 at Tennessee Miller Coliseum. (MTSU photo by Faith Few)

Michael Gascon, a competitor in the colt starting challenge, is shown at the Southern Equine Expo held Feb. 24-26 at Tennessee Miller Coliseum. (MTSU photo by Faith Few)

“Whether you ride English horses or Western horses, you are still able to come to the expo and leave with some new information,” Stewart said.

From trail riding to trick riding, there are several competitions along with the seminars that take place over the three-day event. For example, there’s the “colt starting challenge” in which the rider will train an un-broken horse over the three-day period. There’s also the familiar 4D barrel race where horse and rider teams compete for the fastest time around a cloverleaf pattern.

Patrick Keyser, CEO and manager of the expo, has brought the event to life the past five years, aiming to make each year bigger, better and more educational than the last.

“I want people to take away an appreciation. By hearing from clinicians in every discipline of the horse industry, there are lots of techniques that you can learn from to become a better horseman,” said Keyser, who also worked for MTSU as a clinical specialist of equine reproduction.

Dr. Holly Spooner

Dr. Holly Spooner

Located off West Thompson Lane in north Murfreesboro, the Tennessee Miller Coliseum is a public event facility owned by MTSU and booked by various vendors to host events such as the Southern Equine Expo throughout the year.

At MTSU, the horse science program is taught within the School of Agribusiness and Agriscience. Although MTSU wasn’t involved in putting on the expo, Dr. Holly Spooner, director of the horse science graduate program, said the expo “provides a unique opportunity for our students to experience a diverse, industry-wide event.”

“Students learn what it takes to put on this great event, from personnel management to working with world-renowned clinics, and of course interacting with the general public,” she said. “One of our program goals is always to bring more people into the horse industry, and this expo helps in that.”

For more information about the MTSU horse science program, visit www.mtsu.edu/programs/horse-science/.

For more information about the Southern Equine Expo, visit www.southernequineexpo.com. For information about the Tennessee Miller Coliseum visit www.mtsu.edu/tmc/index.php.

— Faith Few (news@mtsu.edu)

MTSU graduate student Robyn Stewart is shown at the Southern Equine Expo held Feb. 24-26 at Tennessee Miller Coliseum. Stewart worked the event helping with ring set-up and announcements. (MTSU photo by Faith Few)

MTSU graduate student Robyn Stewart is shown at the Southern Equine Expo held Feb. 24-26 at Tennessee Miller Coliseum. Stewart worked the event helping with ring set-up and announcements. (MTSU photo by Faith Few)

Vendors display their goods at the Southern Equine Expo held Feb. 24-26 at Tennessee Miller Coliseum. (MTSU photo by Faith Few)

Vendors display their goods at the Southern Equine Expo held Feb. 24-26 at Tennessee Miller Coliseum. (MTSU photo by Faith Few)

The Southern Equine Expo was held Feb. 24-26 at Tennessee Miller Coliseum. (MTSU photo by Faith Few)

The Southern Equine Expo was held Feb. 24-26 at Tennessee Miller Coliseum. (MTSU photo by Faith Few)

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