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March 15 is application deadline for Community Foundation scholarships

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee is offering three scholarships specifically for MTSU students and prospective students, all with deadlines of March 15.

Community Foundation logo web

Click on the logo for scholarship information.

The Archie Hartwell Nash Memorial Scholarship Fund was established in 1997 to honor the late owner of Overton Produce Company and several related companies.

Eligible applicants for the Nash scholarships must be MTSU sophomores or above, including graduate students, who are working a minimum of 20 hours per week and maintaining a 2.0 or higher grade-point average.

Ken Shipp, an MTSU alumnus who coached football for several teams at the collegiate and professional level, established a scholarship in his name in 2009 for graduating seniors from Rutherford County public high schools who plan to attend MTSU. Shipp died in 2012.

Cameron Blake Parnell

Cameron Blake Parnell

Ken Shipp

Ken Shipp

Applicants for the Shipp scholarship must have a minimum GPA of 2.75 and/or meet the eligibility criteria for the Tennessee Lottery scholarship. In addition, they must have financial need and be persons of good moral character.

Family and friends established the Cameron Blake Parnell Scholarship Fund in 2015 to honor the professional pilot and MTSU alumnus, who earned a bachelor’s degree in aerospace administration in 2006. Parnell died in 2014 in a hiking accident in Crater Lake, Oregon.

Applicants for the Parnell scholarship must be rising juniors or seniors at MTSU who major in aerospace and plan to become pilots. They also must maintain a 3.0 GPA or above.

For more information, contact Pat Embry of the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee at 615-321-4929, extension 114, or at pembry@cfmt.org, or visit www.cfmt.org/request/scholarships.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Wednesday, Feb. 15, is deadline to apply for transfer student scholarships

Wednesday, Feb. 15, is the final deadline for students planning to transfer to Middle Tennessee State University to apply for two significant scholarships: the Guaranteed Transfer Promise Scholarship and the Honors Transfer Fellowship.

Transfer students visiting MTSU listen as Emilie Hendren, second from left, a public relations major, informs them about the James E. Walker Library's many features. (MTSU photos by Eric Sutton)

Transfer students visiting MTSU listen as Emilie Hendren, second from left, a public relations major, informs them about the James E. Walker Library’s many features. (MTSU photos by Eric Sutton)

Applications, fees, transcripts and other requirements for both scholarships must be completed online — or mailed applications postmarked — by Feb. 15.

To receive the Guaranteed Transfer Promise Scholarship, a $3,000 award per year for two years with a maximum of four semesters, first-time students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA and 45 to 105 credit hours and must meet the Feb. 15 application deadline.

For more information, visit www.mtsu.edu/financial-aid/scholarships/incoming-transfer.php. Questions about the Guaranteed Transfer Promise Scholarship also can be directed to the MT One Stop in person in Room 210 of the Student Services and Admissions Center, 1860 Blue Raider Drive, or by calling 615-898-2111.

Dr. Laurie Witherow

Dr. Laurie Witherow

To receive the University Honors College’s Honors Transfer Fellowship, an award of $7,000 per year or $3,500 per semester, qualified students should have completed 60 hours of college or university coursework with a 3.5 GPA or better by fall 2017.

To apply for theHonors Transfer Fellowship, visit http://mtsu.edu/honors/transfer.php. For more information, contact the University Honors College at 615-898-2152.

“We have to have everything by Feb. 15 in order for transfer students to qualify for the guaranteed scholarships,” said Dr. Laurie Witherow, associate vice provost in the Division of Student Affairs.

Admissions personnel need the following from prospective transfers:

  • Admission application.
  • Paid application fee.
  • Official college transcripts through the fall 2016 semester, reflecting the required earned hours and cumulative GPA requirement.
  • Official high school transcript, if applicable.

Student applicants also must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Fellow MTSU tour guide Peyton Tracy, left, and prospective transfer students and their parents listen as Meaghan Hill shares about Peck Hall during the Feb. 10 campus tour. Eligible transfers need to apply by Feb. 15 to be considered for guaranteed and Honors scholarships.

Fellow MTSU tour guide Peyton Tracy, left, and prospective transfer students and their parents listen as Meaghan Hill discusses Peck Hall during a Feb. 10 campus tour. Eligible transfers need to apply by Feb. 15 to be considered for guaranteed and honors scholarships.

Women’s group sets March 10 deadline to apply for $1K MTSU scholarships

Applications for two renewable $1,000 scholarships that are available exclusively to MTSU students are due by Friday, March 10.

AAUW Mboro logo webThe Murfreesboro chapter of the American Association for University Women is offering the Ruth Houston Memorial Undergraduate Scholarship and the new Butler-Fouts Memorial Graduate Scholarship for the fall 2017 and spring 2018 semesters.

Eligible applicants for the Houston scholarship are nontraditional female undergraduate students age 24 and older who demonstrate academic promise and financial need and who have completed their freshman year at MTSU successfully.

The Butler-Fouts scholarship is available to female graduate students from underrepresented ethnic or racial groups who demonstrate academic promise and financial needs.

Applicants must currently be enrolled in or accepted into an MTSU graduate program. Preference will be given to applicants who show that they are close to completing their degrees.

The scholarship is renewable, which could mean a total of $2,000 for an academic year for eligible students.

For more information or to apply, go to www.aauw-murfreesboro.org and click on “Education.”

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Feb. 28 is deadline for MTSU Scholars Week abstract proposals

MTSU students and their faculty mentors who are preparing for the 11th annual Scholars Week 2017 must submit their abstract proposals by noon Tuesday, Feb. 28, according to Dr. Andrienne Friedli, Scholars Week Committee chair.

Senior horse science major Emily Ann Carrol Smith, left, of Cosby, Tennessee, discusses her research with Kalab Fulton, a junior animal science major and biology minor from Shelbyville, Tennessee, during MTSU’s 2016 Scholars Week in this March 2016 file photo. Students and faculty preparing abstracts for this year's Scholars Week face a Feb. 28 deadline. (MTSU file photos by Andy Heidt)

Senior horse science major Emily Ann Carrol Smith, left, of Cosby, Tennessee, discusses her research with Kalab Fulton, a junior animal science major and biology minor from Shelbyville, Tennessee, during MTSU’s 2016 Scholars Week in this March 2016 file photo. Students and faculty preparing abstracts for this year’s Scholars Week face a Feb. 28 deadline. (MTSU file photos by Andy Heidt)

Abstracts should be submitted online through www.mtsu.edu/research/scholarsWeek/index.php.

Dr. Andrienne Friedli

Dr. Andrienne Friedli

Friedli said that each online abstract submission should include a project title and 150- to 300-word summary of the research project. Only submissions with undergraduate and graduate students as first authors will be eligible for judging and prizes.

Applicants will be notified by March 6 if their abstracts have been accepted.

Scholars Week 2017, set March 27-31, will include department and college activities in discipline-specific venues to allow undergraduate, graduate and faculty scholars to make their presentations. Each college has separate submission processes and deadlines for proposals.

Planned activities will include talks, readings, performances, posters and multimedia presentations, said Friedli, a chemistry professor who’s led the Scholars Week Committee for a decade. She also serves as director of special projects for MTSU’s Office of Research Services and director of the university’s Undergraduate Research Experience and Creative Activity, or URECA, grants.

Scholars Week will culminate in a universitywide showcase of posters and multimedia from 12:40 to 3 p.m. Friday, March 31, and performances from 11:30 to 12:30 p.m. and 2:15 to 2:45 p.m. March 31 in the Student Union Ballroom.

Judges will select the winners from each of the colleges. The awards ceremony begins at 3 p.m.

The Scholars Week Committee includes representatives from all of MTSU’s nine colleges, who help arrange each college’s Scholars Day during the weeklong event.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Click on the graphic for more details on Scholars Week 2017 at MTSU.

Click on the graphic for more details on Scholars Week 2017 at MTSU.

MTSU physics major Ghayath Dukkouri, left, of Damascus, Syria, records audio production major Hunter Marlowe of Newnan, Georgia, as Marlowe plays a tune during the finale event for MTSU Scholars Week in this 2016 file photo.

MTSU physics major Ghayath Dukkouri, left, of Damascus, Syria, records audio production major Hunter Marlowe of Newnan, Georgia, as Marlowe plays a tune during the finale event for MTSU Scholars Week in this 2016 file photo.

With extra help, techie MTSU students sweep Hack-MT [+VIDEO]

It didn’t take Belmont University freshman computer science major Tito Ebiwonjumi long to feel right at home at MTSU.

Ebiwonjumi, 17, who is from Lagos, Nigeria, participated in the Department of Computer Science’s second Hack-MT that ended Sunday, Feb. 5, in the Science Building. He pitched an idea on Day 1, but not enough people worked with him. Then he decided to “forget the idea and go work with other people and get the experience.”

The international student joined nine other MTSU student team members to create “VR-Maze.com,” a virtual reality maze game. The group captured first place in the event that brings software developers, visual designers, programmers, computer science and computer information systems students together with industry mentors to create programs and projects in 36 hours. Here’s a recap:

“It took us 26 hours to get it done,” Ebiwonjumi said after the excited team received the first-place award. “We actually created three maps for up to 100 players on one map, but my map did not function. The other two maps functioned well.”

Ebiwomjumi called his first hackathon “a huge learning experience. … I learned to work with people I had never met.” He also carried a MacBook laptop back to Belmont. He won it Sunday morning in a drawing.

MTSU received first-, second- and third-place honors, plus earned the Hackers Choice Award voted on by the competitors.

Runner-up “ParkMT” created a program to help solve the campus’s parking challenges. The team was composed of physics, mathematics (two) and computer science majors.

Yuxin Zhang, 22, a senior computer science major from Lanzhou, China, said she “learned new ways to interpret data and the exchange of ideas with each other.”

As sophomore computer science major Sam Remedios of Nolensville, Tennessee, told onlookers about their creation, upper classman physics and math student Ryan Florida of Nashville said their team benefited from being a mix of majors.

“We just had somebody (an industry mentor) come by and say our project could apply to first responders and to active shooter situations,” Florida said.

Three University of Alabama computer science juniors — Joey Murphy, Scott Carl and Chipper Atkins — collaborated for a Web-related project called “Intellichef” for preparing meals.

MTSU sophomore Samuel Remedios, a computer science major, explains his team's project, "Park MT," to people attending the second Hack-MT event Feb. 5 in the Science Building's Liz and Creighton Rhea Atrium. Teammate Kirolos Shahat, right, a University of Tennessee-Knoxville student, listens.

MTSU sophomore Samuel Remedios, a computer science major, explains his team’s project, “Park MT,” to people attending the second Hack-MT event Feb. 5 in the Science Building’s Liz and Creighton Rhea Atrium. Teammate Kirolos Shahat, right, a University of Tennessee-Knoxville student, listens.

“This was our first experience with a back end Web server, so it was learn as we go,” Murphy said. “We all like to cook. Whether you use an app or look online, you can spend a lot of time scrolling back and forth. What we did is combine the two, where it’s all integrated.”

Yolanda Greene of Murfreesboro, Rutherford County marketing president for premier sponsor First Tennessee Bank, said her biggest takeaway was “how the kids connect to inspire them to create, identify and connect to a greater need in the community.”

“I don’t know the behind-the-scenes work, but I know it was a lot of work,” she said. “I’m hoping to meet some of these guys on the next level (when they seek employment after graduation).”

Greene’s children — Madison, 9, Dwayne Jr., 5, and Selene, 3 — joined their mom for Sunday’s finale, which included judging and awards.

More than 200 students completed 22 projects.

“Every cubby (hole) throughout the whole building was utilized,” said Chrisila Pettey, computer science chair and event director. “And they were all really excited.”

Third-place MTSU “Game of Code” featured 32 team members. “Furby MT,” a personal assistant that talked, earned the Hackers Choice Award. It was a spinoff of the electronic robotic toy released in 1998.

Hack-MT is a way to gather students from MTSU and other universities together with industry partners and alumni to gain experience that might lead to future employment.

Other sponsors include Bondware Inc., Cat Financial, Ingram Book Company, Decision Source Inc., LeanKit and SERVPRO.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

The crowd attending the second Hack-MT hackathon event at MTSU gathers in the Science Building's Liz and Creighton Rhea Atrium during the judging portion of the event.

The crowd attending the second Hack-MT hackathon event at MTSU gathers in the Science Building’s Liz and Creighton Rhea Atrium during the judging portion of the event.

"Furby MT," a project an MTSU team in the Hack-MT event completed, earned the Hackers Choice Award. The second MTSU computer science hackathon event was held Feb. 3-5 in the MTSU Science Building.

“Furby MT,” a project an MTSU team in the Hack-MT event completed, earned the Hackers Choice Award. The second MTSU computer science hackathon event was held Feb. 3-5 in the MTSU Science Building.

The "VR-Maze.com" team earned first-place honors in the Hack-MT in MTSU's Science Building Feb. 5. Michael Schmidt, a MTSU junior computer science major, holds the plaque. Alumnus Sina Serrati, second from right, joined them. The team created a virtual reality maze game.

The “VR-Maze.com” team earned first-place honors in the Hack-MT in MTSU’s Science Building Feb. 5. Michael Schmidt, a MTSU junior computer science major, holds the plaque. Alumnus Sina Serrati, second from right, joined them. The team created a virtual reality maze game.

Attendees try out the first-place winner "VR-Maze.com," a virtual reality maze game for up to 100 players per map, during the Feb. 5 MTSU computer science Hack-MT in the Science Building's Liz and Creighton Rhea Atrium. (MTSU photos by Kimi Conro)

Attendees try out the first-place winner, “VR-Maze.com,” a virtual reality maze game for up to 100 players per map, during the Feb. 5 MTSU computer science Hack-MT in the Science Building’s Liz and Creighton Rhea Atrium. (MTSU photos by Kimi Conro)


Tech-driven college students brainstorm at second Hack-MT

At least a dozen universities and more than 300 tech-savvy collegiate minds will descend on the MTSU campus this weekend for the second Hack-MT.

For 36 hours Friday through Sunday, Feb. 3-5, in the MTSU Science Building, Hack-MT will gather software developers, visual designers, programmers, computer science and computer information systems students from area universities, including MTSU, to form teams to invent new web platforms, mobile apps and electronic gadgets.

Vanderbilt University doctoral candidate Kate Brady, left, of Durham, N.C., explains to Katie St. Francis of Hendersonville, Tenn., about the "Translation Practice" project she worked on during the first Hack-MT in the MTSU Science Building in this January 2016 file photo. St. Francis is director of product strategy for LeanKit, last year’s title sponsor. (MTSU file photo by Randy Weiler)

Vanderbilt University doctoral candidate Kate Brady, left, of Durham, N.C., explains to Katie St. Francis of Hendersonville, Tenn., about the “Translation Practice” project she worked on during the first Hack-MT in the MTSU Science Building in this January 2016 file photo. St. Francis is director of product strategy for LeanKit, last year’s title sponsor. (MTSU file photo by Randy Weiler)

Year 1 was a rousing success for competitors, organizers and sponsors alike, becoming one of the College of Basic and Applied Sciences top events for 2015-16.

“How do you define success?” Dr. Chrisila Pettey, MTSU Department of Computer Science chair, asked rhetorically.

“Based on the follow-up survey results, the attendees really enjoyed it and the students learned a lot, developed more confidence and were excited about what they developed. Students and industry professionals alike wanted us to do another one.”

MTSU students, while slow to gravitate to this new idea for a hacking event a year ago, quickly swung the pendulum. They endured a lack of sleep and kept coffee and energy drinks flowing through their system, leaving ready for another Hack-MT.

“I expect Hack-MT to be great this year,” said Steven Sheffey, 21, an MTSU senior computer science major and mathematics minor from Lebanon, Tennessee.

“We’ve done a lot of campaigning to bring fresh faces into this year’s hack-athon, and I’m hoping the diversity results in some really cool projects.”

Some MTSU students have participated in hack-athons at Purdue University in Indiana, the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Vanderbilt and George Washington University in Washington, D.C. MTSU students even earned an industry-sponsored prize at the BoilerMake IV interplanetary hack-athon at Purdue.

“I’m a hack-athon veteran, so I’m fairly prepared,” Sheffey said. “I always come into a hack-athon with an idea for a project, so I can start working as soon as the event starts. As for my team, they’re ready to roll as well.”

Dr. Chrisila Pettey

Dr. Chrisila Pettey

Pettey said it’s good for students to attend other hack events.

“They’re learning their craft,” she said. “The more they do, the better they will be at it.”

Sheffey said the most important thing he has learned from the hack-athon experiences is the need “to allocate your team’s resources well.”

As for Year 2, Pettey’s hopes and expectations are that “more of our students would come, and whoever comes would have a good learning experience and have fun. Based on input we’ve been given, we’ve tweaked a few things and, hopefully, it will be a good event.”

Registration begins at 5 p.m. Feb. 3, followed by dinner at 6 and opening ceremonies at 7 p.m. in the Liz and Creighton Rhea Atrium. The public is invited to the opening and closing ceremonies; the closing event is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. Feb. 5.

To find parking and the Science Building, a printable campus map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

First Tennessee is the premier sponsor. Other sponsors include Bondware Inc., Cat Financial, Ingram Book Company, Decision Source Inc., LeanKit and SERVPRO.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

HackMT cover72


Feb. 3-5 Hack-MT product development event eyes entries

Organizers planning the second Hack-MT computer event at MTSU are seeking additional groups of tech-savvy college and university entrants for the Feb. 3-5 event as the Jan. 27 deadline approaches.

So far, Belmont, Fisk, Regent and Union universities have joined MTSU in registering for the 36-hour event that brings software developers, visual designers, programmers and computer science students to the university Science Building.

In this January 2016 file photo, MTSU Hack-MT participating students share the results of their projects with judges and others attending the three-day, 36-hour event in the Science Building. (MTSU file photo by Randy Weiler)

In this January 2016 file photo, MTSU Hack-MT participating students share the results of their projects with judges and others attending the three-day, 36-hour event in the Science Building. (MTSU file photo by Randy Weiler)

To register, visit http://tinyurl.com/zjjppyc.

In the inaugural Hack-MT last year, 270 people registered and more than 200 participated during the weekend. In all, 16 products were developed by teams. Two of those were funded by MTSU College of Basic and Applied Sciences Dean Bud Fischer and the teams completed them.

MTSU’s Department of Computer Science is holding the event in collaboration with Hack Tennessee and the TN STEM Innovation Network.

First Tennessee Bank is this year’s presenting sponsor. Other sponsors include LeanKit, Decision Source Inc., Servpro Industries Inc., Bondware, Caterpillar Financial and Ingram Book Company.

For more information, call Chrisila Pettey at 615-898-2397. Pettey is chair of the computer science department.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Get involved! MTSU home to myriad student organizations [+VIDEO]

As they flowed into the Student Union Ballroom on a recent afternoon, curious MTSU students were treated to a full room of information booths representatives from the myriad student organizations available on the Blue Raider campus.

The Center for Student Involvement and Leadership held its spring Student Organization Fair, which drew about 75 student organizations who reserved space to set up informational booths and in some cases demonstrations in hopes of attracting new members.

Jackie Victory, director of the Office of Student Organizations and Service, said this marks the third year for the spring fair, and while she was pleased with the hundreds of students who stopped by during the three-hour event, the organizations on hand represented a sampling of the 350 or so such student groups on campus.

“What we want to do is showcase what there is to do on campus, to get students plugged in to, at a minimum, their departmental organizations, but then we want to get them involved in other things as well because we want this to feel like home to students,” Victory said.

Here’s a video recap of the Jan. 24 event:

From various campus ministries to the Student Government Association and from sports clubs to clubs catering to intense gamers, the spring fair offered a wide range of student groups whose representatives shared brochures, free snacks and a variety of swag to entice attendees to stop by for a quick conversation and even provide contact information for follow ups.

Bryan Long, a sophomore photography major from Murfreesboro, was initially a graphic design major before the Photo Society of MTSU piqued his interest. The group meets weekly to discuss topics such as photography techniques, take field trips to practice their skills or perhaps work in the dark room together.

Members don’t have to be photography majors, which is sort of the point.

“It kind of lets you get a chance to try out some of the things you would get to do if you were a photo major, but if you’re not, you get a chance to work in the Photo Building and see what’s in there,” said Long, vice president of the group.

Alecia Miller, a freshman criminal justice major from Clarksville, Tennessee, heard about the fair from her friend Celeste Brown, a freshman nursing major also from Clarksville. Miller didn’t know what to expect, but afterward felt her time was well invested.

MTSU senior Zack Looney, a history major/archeology minor from Franklin, Tennessee, awaits visitors at the informational table for the MT Greens, the university chapter of the national Green Party, during the spring Student Organization Fair held Tuesday, Jan. 24, inside the Student Union Ballroom. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

MTSU senior Zack Looney, a history major/archeology minor from Franklin, Tennessee, awaits visitors at the informational table for the MT Greens, the university chapter of the national Green Party, during the spring Student Organization Fair held Tuesday, Jan. 24, inside the Student Union Ballroom. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

“It was really informational. I really liked it,” she said, holding information she picked up about the Alpha Kappa Psi business fraternity, which she plans to join.

“I didn’t know we had that many different organizations on campus.”

MTSU senior Zack Looney, a history major/archeology minor from Franklin, Tennessee, is using his last semester to help further establish MT Greens, the university chapter of the national Green Party that launched during the fall semester.

Jackie Victory

Jackie Victory

Although the party’s long-shot nominee Jill Stein wasn’t successful, her candidacy provided an alternative choice in a bitterly divisive election season when the campaigns of the major party candidates didn’t resonate with many among the millennial generation.

“We really just wanted to bring a third party voice into the mix here at MTSU,” said Looney, who is scheduled to graduate in May.

“There were a couple of students who got together and we realized the Republicans and the Dems both didn’t represent the way that we felt politically, so we came together … and we were able to form.”

Looney said the group worked with other organizations in the fall such as Black Lives Matter, and they hope to work with even more groups on issues of mutual interest and concern.

For those students who can’t find a student organization that addresses their area of interest, Victory said that a new group can be established if five currently enrolled like-minded students submit the proper paper work and secure the required faculty adviser. Her office then reviews the application to determine whether the group will be officially registered on campus.

For more information about MTSU student organizations, call 615-898-5812 or visit www.mtsu.edu/involve.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

Members of the Photo Society of MTSU pause for a photo Tuesday, Jan. 24, during the spring Student Organization Fair inside the Student Union Ballroom. Pictured are, bottom left, Kayla Thrift, volunteer officer and sophomore photography major from Cleveland, Tennessee; top left, Blair Bandy, secretary and sophomore photography major from Hendersonville, Tennessee; center, Jasmine Weatherspoon, treasurer and sophomore photography major from Memphis, Tennessee; and at right, Bryan Long, vice president and sophomore photography major from Murfreesboro. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

Members of the Photo Society of MTSU pause for a photo Tuesday, Jan. 24, during the spring Student Organization Fair inside the Student Union Ballroom. Pictured are, bottom left, Kayla Thrift, volunteer officer and sophomore photography major from Cleveland, Tennessee; top left, Blair Bandy, secretary and sophomore photography major from Hendersonville, Tennessee; center, Jasmine Weatherspoon, treasurer and sophomore photography major from Memphis, Tennessee; and at right, Bryan Long, vice president and sophomore photography major from Murfreesboro. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

Several members of the MTSU Generation of Purpose Gospel Choir pause for a photo Tuesday, Jan. 24, during the spring Student Organization Fair inside the Student Union Ballroom. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

Several members of the MTSU Generation of Purpose Gospel Choir pause for a photo Tuesday, Jan. 24, during the spring Student Organization Fair inside the Student Union Ballroom. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

Hundreds of students mingle Tuesday, Jan. 24, during the spring Student Organization Fair inside the Student Union Ballroom. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

Hundreds of students mingle Tuesday, Jan. 24, during the spring Student Organization Fair inside the Student Union Ballroom. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

New, returning MTSU student veterans treated to ‘newcomers briefing’

New and returning MTSU student veterans and their families were welcomed Jan. 19 at a “newcomers briefing” provided by the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center.

The event was held in Cantrell Hall of the Tom H. Jackson Building, 628 Alma Mater Drive.

Hilary Miller, at back standing, director of the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center, listens to comments from Trey Smith during the “newcomers briefing” provided by the center Thursday, Jan. 19, in Cantrell Hall of the Tom H. Jackson Building for new and returning MTSU student veterans and their families. Seated, from left, are Aaron Greenberg and Dr. Brian Hinote, an associate professor in the anthropology and sociology department. (MTSU photo by Eric Sutton)

Dr. Hilary Miller, standing at center left, director of the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center, listens to comments from Trey Smith during the “newcomers briefing” provided by the center Thursday, Jan. 19, for new and returning MTSU student veterans and their families. Seated, from left, are Aaron Greenberg and Dr. Brian Hinote, an associate professor in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology. (MTSU photos by Eric Sutton)

The briefing was to ensure veterans and their families are up to speed on campus resources, said Dr. Hilary Miller, center director.

Miller and her staff targeted new-to-MTSU student veterans and family members, but the event was open to all military-connected students, she said.

“Our goal is to make sure they have on-campus contacts for all offices that can help them be successful,” Miller said. “In addition, we want them to know the center staff, be connected to us and know other student veterans.”

The agenda included a dinner; a welcome and introduction of staff and an explanation of the center’s mission, led by Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives and retired U.S. Army lieutenant general; introductions of veterans; and a discussion of current center programs and fall semester events, led by Miller.

Dr. Derek Frisby, a veteran, MTSU alumnus and professor in the Department of Global Studies and Cultural Geography in the College of Liberal Arts, shared information on MTSU and its relationship with veterans.

Officials also discussed discovering campus resources for veterans, which include tours and information about the G.I. Bill, VetSuccess on Campus and tutoring, and Miller presented a college challenge to the newcomers by emphasizing graduation and employment expectations.

Student veterans can get more information about the center at its website, www.mtsu.edu/military.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives and retired U.S. Army lieutenant general, speaks to new and returning MTSU student veterans and their families attending a “newcomers briefing” provided by the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center Thursday, Jan. 19, in Cantrell Hall of the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Eric Sutton)

Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives and retired U.S. Army lieutenant general, speaks to new and returning MTSU student veterans and their families attending a “newcomers briefing” provided by the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center Thursday, Jan. 19, in Cantrell Hall of the Tom H. Jackson Building.

U.S. Army Capt. Shane Smith, an assistant professor in the MTSU Department of Military Science, speaks to new and returning MTSU student veterans and their families at a “newcomers briefing” provided by the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center held Thursday, Jan. 19, in Cantrell Hall of the Tom H. Jackson Building. 

U.S. Army Capt. Shane Smith, an assistant professor in the MTSU Department of Military Science, speaks to new and returning MTSU student veterans and their families at a “newcomers briefing” provided by the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center held Thursday, Jan. 19, in the Tom H. Jackson Building.

While Military Science professor Capt. Shane Smith holds her daughter, Ava, at right, MTSU student veteran Nashelly Larmon signs in for the “newcomers briefing” provided by the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center Thursday, Jan. 19, in Cantrell Hall of the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Eric Sutton)

While Military Science professor Capt. Shane Smith holds her daughter, Ava, at right, MTSU student veteran Nashelly Larmon signs in for the “newcomers briefing” Jan. 19 in the Tom H. Jackson Building.

MTSU student veteran Timothy “TJ” Lewis, left, accepts a tote bag with information from U.S. Army Capt. Shane Smith, an assistant professor in the Department of Military Science, after signing in at the “newcomers briefing” hosted by the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center Thursday, Jan. 19, in Cantrell Hall of the Tom H. Jackson Building.

MTSU student veteran Timothy “TJ” Lewis, left, accepts a tote bag with information from U.S. Army Capt. Shane Smith, an assistant professor in the Department of Military Science, after signing in at the “newcomers briefing” hosted by the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center Jan. 19 in the Tom H. Jackson Building.

MTSU student veteran Emily Steinway speaks during the “newcomers briefing” provided by the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center held Thursday, Jan. 19, in Cantrell Hall of the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Eric Sutton)

MTSU student veteran Emily Steinway speaks during the “newcomers briefing” provided by the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center held Jan. 19 in the Tom H. Jackson Building.

MTSU recognizes 4,750-plus high achievers on fall 2016 Dean’s List

More than 4,750 MTSU students are included on the latest Dean’s List for their academic achievements for the fall 2016 semester.

fall2016 deans list graphicThis list, alphabetized by home county and surname, is the final compilation by the MTSU Records Office of the names and hometowns of students receiving the Dean’s List distinction for the fall.

The searchable PDF is available by clicking here.

To qualify for the Dean’s List, a student must maintain a current semester grade-point average of 3.5 or above and earn at least 12 semester hours.

The “Dean’s List” notation applies only to undergraduate students. MTSU’s lists are updated after each semester ends and student grades are posted.

An archive of recent Dean’s Lists by semester is available here.

Please note: This updated Dean’s List information is provided by the MTSU Registrar’s Office and is compiled from information from each student’s official records. The Office of News and Media Relations does not compile nor create the final Dean’s List.

For questions about an individual student’s inclusion on the list, please contact the Registrar’s Office at 615-898-5170 or records@mtsu.edu.

MTSU Dance Team competes in national championship in Florida

The MTSU Dance Team is headed to Florida this weekend to compete in the National College Cheerleading and Dance Team Championship for the first time in more than a decade.

Hosted by the Universal Cheerleading Association and Universal Dance Association, the competition runs Friday-Sunday, Jan. 13-15, at ESPN’s Wide World of Sports Complex on the Walt Disney World property in Orlando, Fla.

MTSU Dance Team members Zephanie Dykes, center, and Abby Hutchins, left, show their school spirit during the team’s halftime performance Thursday, Jan. 12, at the Blue Raider men’s basketball game at Murphy Center. The dance team is competing this weekend at the UCA & UDA National College Cheerleading and Dance Team Championship in Orlando, Fla. (MTSU photo by Eric Sutton)

MTSU Dance Team members Zephanie Dykes, center, and Abby Hutchins, left, show their school spirit during the team’s halftime performance Thursday, Jan. 12, at the Blue Raider men’s basketball game at Murphy Center. The dance team is competing this weekend at the UCA & UDA National College Cheerleading and Dance Team Championship in Orlando, Fla. (MTSU photo by Eric Sutton)

First-year coach Rae Boutte, an MTSU alumna and former member of the team, said the 18-member squad will be competing in the Division IA Pom against programs such as Ohio State and the University of Alabama.

MTSU competes Saturday in the semifinal competition, with top teams moving on to Sunday’s finals in the premier college national championship in dance and cheerleading. The networks of ESPN will air the finalists’ performances at the competition later in the year.

“The team has worked countless hours over the holiday break to prepare for the event,” Boutte said. “We are all so excited to start building a nationally recognized program here at MTSU.”

MTSU Dance Team members Katie Leftwich, center, and Abby Hutchins, left, are all smiles during the team’s halftime performance Thursday, Jan. 12, at the Blue Raider men’s basketball game at Murphy Center. The dance team is competing this weekend at the UCA & UDA National College Cheerleading and Dance Team Championship in Orlando, Fla. (MTSU photo by Eric Sutton)

MTSU Dance Team members Katie Leftwich, center, and Abby Hutchins, left, are all smiles during the team’s halftime performance Thursday, Jan. 12, at the Blue Raider men’s basketball game at Murphy Center. (MTSU photo by Eric Sutton)

The dance team is part of the MTSU Band of Blue and performs with the band during halftime of Blue Raider football games while also doing pre-game and in-game routines. The team also performs during halftime of some home basketball games, the latest coming Thursday night when the group performed its national’s routine at the men’s game at Murphy Center before jumping on a bus for Florida.

“It is a phenomenal group of students, and they have represented MTSU at the highest level this year,” said music professor Craig Cornish, director of the Band of Blue. “We are very proud of our dance team and our new coach.”

Boutte, who relocated from Georgia with her husband, Scott, and their two young sons a year ago, said the team attended UDA summer camps last year and submitted footage showing their routines and spirit-raising techniques in order to qualify for the competition.

“We are so excited to be representing MTSU, and we hope to bring more attention to the university and our program,” Boutte said. “It’s such an honor to get to come home and do this.”

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

The MTSU Dance Team performs at halftime Thursday, Jan. 12, at the men’s basketball game at Murphy Center. The team headed to Orlando, Fla., following the game to compete this weekend at the UCA & UDA National College Cheerleading and Dance Team Championship. (MTSU photo by Eric Sutton)

The MTSU Dance Team performs at halftime Thursday, Jan. 12, at the men’s basketball game at Murphy Center. The team headed to Orlando, Fla., following the game to compete this weekend at the UCA & UDA National College Cheerleading and Dance Team Championship. (MTSU photo by Eric Sutton)

MTSU Honors Transfer Fellowship has Feb. 15 application deadline

A special incentive in the form of a $3,500 scholarship for up to four semesters awaits prospective MTSU transfer students who meet the eligibility criteria and apply by the Feb. 15 deadline.

The MTSU Honors College is offering 30 Honors Transfer Fellowship awards, which are patterned after the highly successful Buchanan Fellows Program.

Dr. John Vile

Dr. John Vile

To apply, visit http://mtsu.edu/honors/transfer.php.

Chosen applicants will be a part of the fifth class of transfer students. The transfer fellowships began in 2013. In the previous four years, the Honors College awarded 15 such awards.

“In talking to President Sidney A. McPhee, this is two years after implementation of the Tennessee Promise (free community college tuition),” said John Vile, Honors College dean. “We are anticipating that significantly more community college graduates will be benefiting from that this year.”

The fellowship is open to students who anticipate having completed 60 hours of college or university coursework with a 3.5 GPA or better by the fall of 2017.

Honors College logoRecipients will gain special consideration for support for study abroad and for making presentations at scholarly conferences. Students who are accepted as fellows will complete a common class together during their first semester at MTSU.

For up to six out of state transfer recipients, the award will be $7,000 per semester because they pay higher tuition and fees, Vile said.

For those who do not receive the Honors Transfer Fellowship, MTSU Financial Aid also offers a guaranteed Transfer Promise Scholarship of $1,500 a semester to students with a 3.0 GPA who complete their application by Wednesday, Feb. 15.

Applications by mail must be postmarked by Feb. 15. Applications must include official transcripts of all college and university work, two letters of recommendation from college professors and/or honors administrators and a personal essay.

For more information, call 615-898-2152.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

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