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AAUW hosts Sept. 10 open house, fundraiser for university women

As a new academic year begins, female college students, faculty and staff are being invited to join other academic women to help each other advance in the university environment.

The American Association of University Women’s Murfreesboro branch, which includes MTSU members, will host “Busking at the Boulevard” at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 10, at The Boulevard Bar & Grille, 2154 Middle Tennessee Blvd. in Murfreesboro.

AAUW Mboro logo webAlong with a chance for fellowship, the open house and fundraiser will give new members an opportunity to join AAUW at half-price dues.

The September branch meeting will precede the open house at 5 p.m. in Room 101 of the Sam Ingram Building at 2269 Middle Tennessee Blvd.

Donations also are welcome to support nationwide AAUW programs such as “$mart $tart,” which funds workshops to help college women entering the job market negotiate salaries and benefits, and the National College Conference for Women Student Leaders. All donations are tax-deductible.

The cover charge for the Sept. 10 gathering is $10 for professionals and branch members and $5 for students. For more information, contact AAUW-Murfreesboro at AAUWMurfreesboro@gmail.com.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Registration open now for Sept. 17 MTSU business tax seminar

Registration is open for the seventh annual 2015 Tennessee Business Tax Seminar Series presented by the Tennessee Department of Revenue and MTSU’s Department of Accounting.

The seminar will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 17, at the DoubleTree Hotel, 1850 Old Fort Parkway in Murfreesboro. It is designed to provide current, in-depth information on Tennessee tax issues to business owners, CPAs and other interested parties.

Dept of Accounting logo web

State tax specialists will present recent developments in legislation, including updates from the current 2015 legislative session, and discuss various tax types and exemptions including business, sales and use, gift and inheritance, individual income and tangible personal property.

Attendees will receive comprehensive materials covering these topics and will have the opportunity to ask questions. Participants are eligible for Continuing Professional Education, or CPE, and Continuing Education Unit, or CEU, credits.

Representatives from the state Department of Revenue, Comptroller for the Treasury, and Department of Labor and Workforce Development will provide keynote speakers. Registration is $190 and can be made at www.mtsu.edu/accounting/seminars.php.

For more information, email tonya.davenport@mtsu.edu or call 615-898-5306.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

Girls’ STEM event features dog trainers, activity for parents [+VIDEO]

Two women who train dogs for competitions, plus a special activity for up to 30 adults, will be featured during the 19th annual Expanding Your Horizons in math and science event for girls Saturday, Sept. 26, at MTSU.

Krista Wade with Happy Valley Kennels in Bell Buckle, Tennessee, and Kathy Green, an executive aide in the MTSU Department of Chemistry, will highlight the event for middle school and high school girls.

The pair plans to bring Green’s German shepherd, Hershey; Wade’s shepherds Nike, Berlin and possibly Panzer; and Firecracker, a dog they train together, to this year’s EYH.

MTSU chemistry executive aide Kathy Green works with her German shepherd, Hershey. She and Krista Wade will be featured presenters at the Sept. 27 Expanding Your Horizons at MTSU. (Photo by Hope Enmore)

MTSU chemistry executive aide Kathy Green works with her German shepherd, Hershey. She and Krista Wade will be featured presenters at the Sept. 27 Expanding Your Horizons at MTSU. (Photo by Hope Enmore)

For adults, Debbie Frisby, a new Homer Pittard Campus School teacher, will offer “InventionX” as a challenging educational tool to guide children through real-world application of science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM.

EYH logo croppedInventionX is applied STEM, where students in grades six through 12 compete for awards and recognition as the next great inventors.

Expanding Your Horizons is a hands-on math and science event to help girls consider careers in these fields as well as engineering and technology.

EYH gives girls opportunities to talk with women in STEM and attend this type of conference with other girls.

Openings remain in registration for both girls in middle school and high school. Event organizers recently added 25 more slots for the older girls.

To register, go to www.mtsu.edu/wistem/eyh and click on “Registration.” A link for the parent or guardian release form is included on the registration page.

Wade and Green have trained together for 10 years. They and their dogs compete nationally, and Wade also competes in international events.

Debbie Frisby

Debbie Frisby

Green discussed the topic “The Nose Knows” during EYH 2014 and said this year’s presentation will be an extension of that conversation.

The pair also makes presentations through the local Read to Succeed program, where they go into schools and children read to their dogs.

Wade and one of her dogs has worked with at least one family to detect and divert diabetic seizures. She’s also trained dogs to detect bombs.

Frisby, who teaches fifth graders, attended InventionX training in July.

“Through hands-on, problem-based learning activities, the EYH adult workshop will help parents understand the InventionX five-step framework,” she said.

“Using InventionX, they can better guide their children through real-world application of STEM knowledge while increasing their critical thinking skills and longterm engagement in the STEM fields.”

For more information about Expanding Your Horizons, call 615-904-8253 or email eyh@mtsu.edu.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Dog trainer Krista Wade of Bell Buckle, Tenn., is shown with two of her shepherds, Berlin, left, and Nike. (Submitted photo)

Dog trainer Krista Wade of Bell Buckle, Tenn., is shown with two of her shepherds, Berlin, left, and Nike. (Submitted photo)

Watch this short video about the speakers:

http://youtu.be/XFNVKK0Zkwc

Stay safer this fall with new MTSU series of rape-defense classes

Women on and around the MTSU campus can prepare for their own safety by taking the MTSU Police Department’s new five-week fall session of free Rape Aggression Defense classes.

A Rape Aggression Defense Systems instructor, wearing the red protective gear, tangles with a student during a RAD course after she knocks another instructor to the ground. The MTSU Police Department has set a five-week summer RAD course beginning Wednesday, June 10. (Photo courtesy of R.A.D. Systems)

A Rape Aggression Defense Systems instructor, wearing red protective gear, tangles with a student during a RAD course after she knocks another instructor to the ground. The MTSU Police Department has set a five-week fall RAD course beginning Aug. 26. (Photo courtesy of R.A.D. Systems)

This fall 2015 course is set each Wednesday beginning Aug. 26 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. and is open to all female MTSU students, faculty and staff, along with the general public.

The course concludes Sept. 23, and participants must attend all five sessions to ensure that they receive proper training.

RAD color logo webThe Rape Aggression Defense System is a comprehensive program of realistic defense tactics and techniques for women that emphasizes awareness, prevention, risk reduction and avoidance and progresses to the basics of hands-on defense training.

Nationally certified RAD instructors teach MTSU’s free course.

The program is designed for females age 13 and older with no previous experience or background in physical skills training. Instructors will work to accommodate any physical impairment a participant may have.

Class size is limited for this new fall course, so the MTSU Police Department is encouraging interested parties to enroll as soon as possible

Participants should email their names and contact information to rad@mtsu.edu. Instructors will call or email participants with more details about enrollment and the class location.

For more information about MTSU’s RAD classes, send an email to rad@mtsu.edu.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU expands ‘True Blue Tour’ to 9 cities this fall

Middle Tennessee State University’s top administrators and deans will meet with prospective students in nine cities this fall — six in-state and, for the first time, three in bordering states — as part of the university’s expanded “True Blue Tour.”

Organized annually by the university’s Admissions Office, this year’s True Blue Tour includes the traditional six Tennessee recruitment stops in Chattanooga on Tuesday, Sept. 29; Johnson City on Monday, Oct. 19; Knoxville on Tuesday, Oct. 20; Nashville on Thursday, Oct. 22; Memphis on Monday, Nov. 16; and Jackson on Tuesday, Nov. 17.

In this September 2014 file photo, Elyssa Hurley, left, and her mother, Estelle, both from Lenoir City, Tennessee, discuss the technical qualities and capabilities of the Department of Electronic Media Communication’s $1.8 million mobile production truck during the Knoxville True Blue Tour. Elyssa Hurley has been accepted and plans to transfer to MTSU from Roane State Community College’s campus in Lenoir City, The Roane State sophomore plans to study history and film. (MTSU file photo by News and Media Relations)

In this September 2014 file photo, Elyssa Hurley, left, and her mother, Estelle, both from Lenoir City, Tennessee, discuss the technical qualities and capabilities of the Department of Electronic Media Communication’s $1.8 million mobile production truck during the Knoxville True Blue Tour. Elyssa Hurley has been accepted and plans to transfer to MTSU from Roane State Community College’s campus in Lenoir City. The Roane State sophomore plans to study history and film. (MTSU file photo by News and Media Relations)

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

The new out-of-state stops include Atlanta on Wednesday, Sept. 30; Huntsville, Alabama, on Wednesday, Nov. 4; and Bowling Green, Kentucky, on Wednesday, Nov. 11.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee and other administrators will join deans from the university’s eight academic colleges, the library services dean and counselors from the financial aid and admissions offices.

They will be on hand to answer questions from prospective students, transfer students and their parents at the events.

“We look forward to again visiting with prospective students and their families during the tour,” McPhee said.

“It’s a prime opportunity to explain the unique educational experience MTSU offers, and we again invite our many alumni and friends across the state to stop by and help spread the word about our university.”

During the three out-of-state stops, university leaders will emphasize MTSU’s Academic Common Market program. This tuition savings program allows prospective students who live in participating states to qualify for in-state tuition rates for unique academic majors not offered in their home state. Learn more at www.mtsu.edu/acm.

“We think some out-of-state students and parents will find our ACM program very attractive, so this is a great opportunity to spread the word,” said Deb Sells, vice president for student affairs and vice provost for enrollment and academic services.

MTSU’s admissions counselors will also meet with high school counselors at eight of the tour stops and provide them with campus and program updates.

Each True Blue Tour reception starts at 6 p.m. local time, except for the Nashville stop, which begins at 6:30 p.m. The events are free, but students should register here in advance.

True Blue Tour new sign-crop

Click on the image to register for the 2015 True Blue Tour.

Fall True Blue Tour reception sites are:

  • Sept. 29: Chattanooga Convention Center, 1 Carter Plaza, Chattanooga.
  • Sept. 30: Cobb Galleria Centre, 2 Galleria Parkway SE, Atlanta.
  • Oct. 19: The Millennium Centre, 2001 Millennium Place, Johnson City.
  • Oct. 20: The Foundry on the Fair Site, 747 World’s Fair Park Drive, Knoxville.
  • Oct. 22: Renaissance Nashville Hotel, 611 Commerce St., Nashville.
  • 4: U.S. Space and Rocket Center, 1 Tranquility Base, Huntsville, Alabama;
  • 11: Holiday Inn University Plaza, 1021 Wilkinson Trace, Bowling Green, Kentucky;
  • 16: The Peabody Memphis, 149 Union Ave., Memphis;
  • 17: The Jackson Country Club, 31 Jackson Country Club Drive, Jackson.

Freshman students who meet all scholarship criteria, and who complete applications for MTSU admission by no later than Dec. 1, will receive guaranteed awards.

Transfer students who meet all transfer scholarship criteria, and who complete applications for fall admission by no later than Feb. 15, will receive guaranteed awards.

MTSU also is mailing brochures to thousands of Tennessee high school seniors with ACT scores of 19 and higher with an invitation to attend a True Blue Tour stop and visit the Murfreesboro campus, Sells added.

Fall Preview Days have been scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 26, and Saturday, Nov. 7, starting at 8 a.m. in the Student Union, Sells added. High school and community college students and counselors, as well as parents, can register to attend any MTSU Admissions events by visiting this site.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU ceremony commissions pair into reserves, guard

MTSU’s Department of Military Science commissioned two senior ROTC student-cadets during a ceremony Friday, Aug. 7, in Keathley University Center Theater.

Jeffrey Enderson of Smyrna, Tennessee, and Damian Parker of Centerville, Tennessee, are two of the military’s newest members.

MTSU student-cadet Damian Parker, center, of Centerville, Tennessee, stands at attention while his grandmother, Lorene Parker, left, of Centerville and girlfriend Amanda Goodman of Fort Walton Beach, Fla., pin on his second lieutenant bars during the Aug. 7 military science ROTC commissioning ceremony in Keathley University Center Theater. Damian Parker will graduate Saturday, Aug. 8, with a bachelor's degree in criminal justice. He receives a commission in the engineer branch of the U.S. Army reserves. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

MTSU student-cadet Damian Parker, center, of Centerville, Tennessee, stands at attention while his grandmother, Lorene Parker, left, of Centerville and girlfriend Amanda Goodman of Fort Walton Beach, Fla., pin on his second lieutenant bars during the Aug. 7 military science ROTC commissioning ceremony in Keathley University Center Theater. Damian Parker will graduate Saturday, Aug. 8, with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice. He received a commission in the engineer branch of the U.S. Army reserves. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

U.S. Army Major Jason Beck, a public affairs officer for the Southeast medical area support group at Fort Knox, Kentucky, was guest speaker. His primary message to Enderson, 26, and Parker, 25, was about trust.

Both Enderson and Parker are degree candidates for the Saturday, Aug. 8, commencement in Murphy Center.

A psychology major, Enderson will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in psychology. He received a reserve forces duty commission into the military intelligence branch of the Tennessee Army National Guard.

Parker, a criminal justice major, received a commission in the engineer branch of the U.S. Army reserves. He plans to pursue his master’s degree in engineering management at MTSU.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

 

 

As his mother Brenda Enderson, right, of Smyrna, Tennessee, watches, Jeffrey Enderson has his second lieutenant bars pinned on him by his father, Scott, Aug. 7 during the MTSU military science ROTC commissioning ceremony in the Keathley University Center Theater. Jeffrey Enderson, who is a psychology major, will graduate Saturday, Aug. 8, during the university's summer commencement in Murphy Center. He receives a reserve forces duty commission in the Tennessee Army National Guard in the military intelligence branch. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

As his mother Brenda Enderson, right, of Smyrna, Tennessee, watches, Jeffrey Enderson has his second lieutenant bars pinned on him by his father, Scott, Aug. 7 during the MTSU military science ROTC commissioning ceremony in the Keathley University Center Theater. Jeffrey Enderson, who is a psychology major, will graduate Saturday, Aug. 8, during the university’s summer commencement in Murphy Center. He received a reserve forces duty commission in the Tennessee Army National Guard in the military intelligence branch. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

 

 

 

MTSU honors student-veterans at second Stole Ceremony [+VIDEO]

Cleveland and Bradley County, Tennessee, native Brock Howard served in the U.S. Navy.

As an aviation electronic technician, he assisted a helicopter squadron, working with equipment that would blow up enemy mines in the Middle East.

Saturday, Aug. 8, Howard will graduate with a bachelor’s degree from the College of Mass Communication. Unlike technology that would blow up enemy mines, his forte has been in video and film production in electronic media communication.

MTSU celebrated its student-veterans approaching commencement with the second Graduating Veterans Stole Ceremony Wednesday, Aug. 5, and Howard, 28, was among 11 student-veterans attending.

http://youtu.be/qU-6XX994EE

Starting with the first Stole Ceremony in May, MTSU began to honor its graduating veterans with a formal ceremony in front of family, friends and university administrators in Cantrell Hall of the Tom H. Jackson Building.

“It’s great,” Howard said of the honor bestowed upon the veterans by MTSU. “It lets you know you’re appreciated. Every single veteran and active-duty personnel sacrifices selflessly, but it’s nice to be recognized and know your peers and (academic) scholars are there to support you.”

Graduating MTSU student-veteran Kendra Buster, left, talks with Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives, and Hilary Miller, director of the Veterans and Military Family Center, before the second Graduating Veterans Stole Ceremony. The event was held Aug. 5 in the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photos by Andy Heidt)

Graduating MTSU student-veteran Kendra Buster, left, talks with Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives, and Hilary Miller, director of the Veterans and Military Family Center, before the second Graduating Veterans Stole Ceremony. The event was held Aug. 5 in the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photos by Andy Heidt)

Howard and the others received red stoles to wear with their cap and gown at commencement.

“When you walk across the stage with hundreds of other graduates, it’s your chance to be recognized,” he said.

Detroit native Kendra Buster, who will graduate and then pursue her master’s degree in professional studies, said “distinguishing the veterans is an honor considering the ups and downs we have.”

Buster was active duty in the U.S. Army.

Accompanied by wife Amber and daughters Lizzy Jo, 2, and Olivia, 2 months, Charles Buntin said it was “nice to have the university recognize our service.”

“I definitely would recommend any veteran come here,” added Buntin, who served as a military science professor while pursuing his sports industry degree. “They (MTSU) understand how to help us back into the college environment.”

From left, MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, graduating student-veteran Casey Bowman of Lebanon, Tennessee, Provost Brad Bartel and Keith Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives and a retired U.S. Army lieutenant general, are shown during the second Graduating Senior Stole Ceremony Aug. 5 in the Tom H. Jackson Building.

From left, MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, graduating student-veteran Casey Bowman of Lebanon, Tennessee, Provost Brad Bartel and Keith Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives and a retired U.S. Army lieutenant general, are shown during the second Graduating Senior Stole Ceremony Aug. 5 in the Tom H. Jackson Building.

Student-veteran Lori Terry, 57, of Smyrna, Tennessee, has earned her Master of Business Administration from the Jones College of Business. A former air crew life support member in the U.S. Air Force, Terry said she’s “honored they do this for the veterans and grateful to all the other veterans as well.”

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee told the recipients they had “honored us with your service to our nation. You have honored us by choosing MTSU for your higher education. And, today, you honor us yet again by allowing us to show our gratitude and thanks for the milestone you will reach at Saturday’s commencement ceremonies.”

During the event, McPhee shared news and renderings regarding the new Veteran and Military Family Center, a one-stop shop for student-veterans that will open in November.

Provost Brad Bartel said the academic side of campus is “looking at new degree programs tailored to your needs and gear you toward success.” He added that by attending and now graduating from MTSU “you have become part of the economic and social engine.”

Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives, called the student-veterans “precious heroes. Your service is a constant — a reason to celebrate this moment.”

Tennessee Department of Veterans Services Commissioner Many-Bears Grinder attended along with Edna M. MacDonald, director of the Nashville Regional Office of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs; Suzanne Jene, deputy director of Tennessee Valley Health Services; and Beth Duffield, vice president of workforce development with the Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Made by Jostens, the red stole, with both veteran and MTSU logos, is awarded to graduating student-veterans.

Made by Jostens, the red stole, with both veteran and MTSU logos, is awarded to graduating student-veterans.

Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives and a retired U.S. Army lieutenant general, provides the welcome and opening remarks at the second Graduating Senior Stole Ceremony Aug. 5 in the Tom H. Jackson Building’s Cantrell Hall.

Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives and a retired U.S. Army lieutenant general, provides the welcome and opening remarks at the second Graduating Senior Stole Ceremony Aug. 5 in the Tom H. Jackson Building’s Cantrell Hall.

Girl power electrifies 2015 Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp at MTSU

That electrifying sound emanating soon from the MTSU campus will be the sound of young girls finding their voices.

The 13th annual Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp, slated for July 27 through Aug. 1, will give nearly 50 girls between the ages of 10 and 17 a chance to express themselves through music and show an audience what they’ve learned.

The band “Spotlight Slayers” performs the song “Good Time” at the showcase concert concluding the 2014 Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp at MTSU. (Photo by MTSU News and Media Relations)

The band “Spotlight Slayers” performs the song “Good Time” at the showcase concert concluding the 2014 Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp at MTSU. (Photo by MTSU News and Media Relations)

MTSU alumna Kelley Anderson, a co-founder of Those Darlins and a professional musician and audio engineer, created the day camp in 2003 to give young women an empowering, positive place for self-expression through music.

“We’ve got a lot of campers that are coming back this year as volunteers,” said Sarah Bandy, administrative director of the camp’s parent nonprofit organization, Youth Empowerment through Arts and Humanities.

Campers will check in at 8:30 a.m. each morning Monday through Friday, followed by assembly at 9 a.m. They are to be picked up by 5:30 p.m.

To find parking and buildings on campus, attendees can use the printable map at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParking14-15.

Activities, most of which will take place in the Wright Music Building, include instruction from experienced musicians in beginning and advanced guitar, beginning and advanced drums, vocals, electronic music and bass.

The camp will culminate in a showcase concert at 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 1, at Hinton Hall in the Wright Music Building. Tickets are $10 for adults ages 18 and over and $5 for ages 10 through 17; children under 10 will be admitted at no charge.

You can watch a video from the 2014 showcase below.

http://youtu.be/AJVgl2Yyi7w

Members of the audience can win guitars, massages, gift certificates, a scholarship to next year’s camp and other prizes in a raffle on the day of the showcase.

Workshops in recording, screen printing, photography, image and identity and music “herstory” will be provided. There also will be daily lunchtime performances from local acts such as Wildfront, Sallow, Becky Buller and many more.

Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp is a program of Youth Empowerment through Arts and Humanities, or YEAH!, a Murfreesboro-based nonprofit organization. For more information, contact YEAH! at 615-849-8140 or artsempoweryouth@gmail.com, or visit the SGRRC Facebook page.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Young musicians celebrate the 2013 Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp inside MTSU's Wright Music Hall in this file photo provided by Youth Empowerment through Arts and Humanities.

Young musicians celebrate the 2013 Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp inside MTSU’s Wright Music Hall in this file photo provided by Youth Empowerment through Arts and Humanities.

Chinese students wrap up cultural exchange visit at Student Union

A group of 30-plus Chinese children visiting Murfreesboro as part of an educational and cultural exchange wrapped up their visit July 14 with closing ceremonies in the Student Union Ballroom.2eeee

In town since July 10, the visitors from Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University also included Chinese educators and parents.

Confucius Institute logoTheir five-day visit marked the fourth year of a reciprocal exchange program organized by the university. Rutherford students visited China in 2012 and 2014, and Dongcheng students first came to the Murfreesboro campus in 2013. The delegation’s visit ended July 15.

The Confucius Institute, named for the ancient Chinese philosopher Confucius, is sponsored by China’s Education Ministry to promote Chinese language, history and culture through tours, exchanges and university partnerships. There are more than 440 institutes in 120 countries.

MTSU joined with Hangzhou Normal to open its institute in 2010. The two partners recently extended their pact for an additional five years.

MTSU first lady Elizabeth McPhee, right, chats with a student from Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University in China during closing ceremonies Tuesday night in the Student Union Ballroom to wrap up their visit to Murfreesboro. The visit, which included elementary and middle schoolers as well as educators from China, was facilitated by the MTSU Confucius Institute, which works to develop cultural and educational ties between China and the United States. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU first lady Elizabeth McPhee, right, chats with a student from Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University in China during closing ceremonies July 14 in the Student Union Ballroom to wrap up their visit to Murfreesboro. The visit, which included elementary and middle schoolers as well as educators from China, was facilitated by the MTSU Confucius Institute, which works to develop cultural and educational ties between China and the United States. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

Elementary and middle school children from Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University in China perform during closing ceremonies Tuesday night in the Student Union Ballroom to wrap up their visit to Murfreesboro. The visit was facilitated by the MTSU Confucius Institute, which works to develop cultural and educational ties between China and the United States. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

Elementary and middle school students from Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University in China perform during closing ceremonies July 14  in the Student Union Ballroom to wrap up their visit to Murfreesboro. The visit was facilitated by the MTSU Confucius Institute, which works to develop cultural and educational ties between China and the United States.

 


 

Games, fun for Chinese students at MTSU President’s picnic [+VIDEO]

July 13, 2015

The lawn of the MTSU President’s Residence turned into a picnic ground July 13 for the 30-plus Chinese school children visiting Murfreesboro as part of an educational and cultural exchange organized by the university.

Cheerleaders from Blackman High School and MTSU welcome a delegation of visiting Chinese youngsters from Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University to MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee’s official residence Monday. At center is MTSU first lady Elizabeth McPhee. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

Cheerleaders from Blackman High School and MTSU welcome a delegation of visiting Chinese youngsters from Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University to MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee’s official residence July 13. At center is MTSU first lady Elizabeth McPhee. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

The visitors from Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University started the day at Overall Creek Elementary School, where retired Murfreesboro City Schools educator Elizabeth McPhee, the first lady of the university, arranged for them to explore American-style classrooms and meet with local teachers.

They returned to campus by midday for a picnic at the President’s Residence that resembled a pep rally with cheerleaders from Blackman High School and MTSU welcoming the group.

Blackman cheerleaders did face-painting for the Chinese children as well, and a watermelon-eating contest followed lunch.

The head coaches from MTSU’s volleyball and soccer teams, Matt Peck and Aston Rhoden, as well as players from both teams, also led the visitors in demonstrations of both sports. The lawn featured soccer goals and a volleyball net for the occasion.

The children, ranging from middle- to high-school ages, clearly were thrilled by all of the activities, as was MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee.

“What a beautiful day for a picnic,” President McPhee said. “It’s another great experience for our Chinese guests to treasure about their visit to our campus and our country.”

Watch a video from the picnic:

http://youtu.be/aFSq2RgOfEY

The group, led by former HNU President and Dongcheng Chairman Lin Zhengfan, left the picnic for a tour of the MTSU campus, then viewed science projects by Scales Elementary School students on display in the lobby of MTSU’s Science Building.

MTSU’s mascot, Lightning, gets to know Chinese children visiting from Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University on the grounds of the MTSU President’s Residence Monday. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU’s mascot, Lightning, gets to know Chinese children visiting from Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University on the grounds of the MTSU President’s Residence July 13. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

They spent the evening socializing with the families of Rutherford County students who visited Hangzhou last year as part of the annual reciprocal visits organized by MTSU’s Confucius Institute.

Teachers and administrators from both countries will huddle July 14 to exchange ideas and swap classroom experiences, a feature that President McPhee said is the centerpiece of the visit. The delegation’s five-day trip to the United States ends July 15.

The Confucius Institute, named for the ancient Chinese philosopher Confucius, is sponsored by China’s Education Ministry to promote Chinese language, history and culture through tours, exchanges and university partnerships. There are more than 440 institutes in 120 countries.

MTSU joined with Hangzhou Normal to open its institute in 2010. The two partners recently extended their pact for an additional five years.

— Andrew Oppmann (andrew.oppmann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, fifth row, center, poses Monday with the delegation from Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University, MTSU cheerleaders and cheerleaders from Blackman High School in front of the President’s Residence. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, fifth row, center, poses July 13 with the delegation from Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University, MTSU cheerleaders and cheerleaders from Blackman High School in front of the President’s Residence. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

Visiting youngsters from Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University experience what an American classroom is like Monday at Overall Creek Elementary School in Murfreesboro. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

Visiting youngsters from Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University experience what an American classroom is like at Overall Creek Elementary School in Murfreesboro. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

A youngster from Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University enjoys watermelon at a picnic Monday on the grounds of the MTSU President’s Residence. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

A youngster from Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University enjoys watermelon at a July 13 picnic on the grounds of the MTSU President’s Residence. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)


 

MTSU brings 30-plus Chinese children to East Tennessee

July 12, 2015

MARYVILLE, Tennessee — More than 30 elementary and middle school students from Hangzhou, China, came to east Tennessee July 12 as part of a five-day education and cultural exchange program organized by Middle Tennessee State University.

The 30-plus Chinese youngsters, accompanied by parents, teachers and administrators, came from Murfreesboro to Maryville by bus for a picnic lunch on the farm of Keith and Peggy McCord, then traveled to The Lost Sea Adventure, part of the Craighead Caverns near Sweetwater.

A delegation of Chinese school children, sponsored by Middle Tennessee State University, pose with Keith and Peggy McCord on Sunday after a picnic on the McCordsÕ Maryville, Tennessee, farm. (MTSU photo)

A delegation of Chinese school children, sponsored by Middle Tennessee State University, pose with Keith and Peggy McCord July 12 after a picnic on the McCords’ Maryville, Tennessee, farm. (MTSU photo)

McCord, a former member of the Tennessee Board of Regents, and his family helped MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee and his wife, Elizabeth, plan the excursion to east Tennessee. Chinese students were treated to a barbecue at the McCords’ farm, played games and explored a nearby pond.

“We deeply appreciate the kindness and generosity of the McCords in hosting our Chinese visitors,” said McPhee. “It was an opportunity to showcase this beautiful part of Tennessee and provide them experiences they will not forget.”MTSU Wordmark

The visit is the fourth of the reciprocal exchanges between MTSU and the Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University. Rutherford County students visited China in 2012 and 2014, and Dongcheng students first came to the Murfreesboro campus in 2013.

The delegation will tour an elementary school, view science projects by Rutherford students on display in the lobby of MTSU’s Science Building and learn about MTSU’s partnerships with universities in China.

Teachers and administrators from both countries, meanwhile, will participate in educational workshops. McPhee said what makes this exchange unique is the opportunity for teachers and administrators from both counties to collaborate and share ideas.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, left, and Yiping Cui, associate director of MTSU's Confucius Institute listen to Keith McCord's welcome to a delegation Chinese school children visiting his Maryville, Tenn., farm on Sunday. (MTSU Photo)

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, left, and Yiping Cui, associate director of MTSU’s Confucius Institute listen to Keith McCord’s welcome to a delegation Chinese school children visiting his Maryville, Tenn., farm July 12. (MTSU Photo)

The exchange is coordinated by MTSU’s Confucius Institute. Named for the ancient Chinese philosopher Confucius, the institute is sponsored by China’s Education Ministry to promote Chinese language, history and culture through tours, exchanges and university partnerships. There are more than 440 institutes in 120 countries.

MTSU joined with Hangzhou Normal to open its institute in 2010 and recently extended the partnership for an additional five years.

Under the leadership of Director Guanping Zheng and Associate Director Yiping Cui, MTSU’s institute has helped teach Chinese language and culture to more than 2,000 students in seven Tennessee counties. It also offers long-distance language training via satellite TV and the Internet.

MTSU also announced plans in March to build a Chinese Music and Cultural Center, which will be funded from a $1 million grant from Hanban, the headquarters operation of the Confucius Institutes.

— Andrew Oppmann (andrew.oppmann@mtsu.edu)


 

Chinese youngsters introduced to Murfreesboro, MTSU

July 11, 2015

The 30-plus Chinese youngsters visiting Murfreesboro July 11 as part of an educational and cultural exchange organized by MTSU started with a heavy dose of Tennessee history and local geography.

But it’s safe to say that the Discovery Center at Murfree Springs was the high point for the middle and high school students visiting Middle Tennessee, along with many parents, teachers and administrators, as part of an reciprocal exchange facilitated by MTSU’s Confucius Institute.

A guide at the Discovery Center at Murfree Springs on Saturday shows a reptile to Chinese school children visiting Murfreesboro as part of an educational and cultural exchange organized by MTSU. (MTSU Photo)

A guide at the Discovery Center at Murfree Springs shows a reptile to Chinese school children visiting Murfreesboro July 11 as part of an educational and cultural exchange organized by MTSU.

Day One for the visitors from Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University started at the Embassy Suites, where retired Murfreesboro City Schools educator Elizabeth McPhee, the first lady of the university, mapped out a morning for cultural orientation.

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee web

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

Guests moved from table to table, where Rutherford County students who visited Hangzhou last year described different elements of the local community.A first visit to the MTSU Student Union Building for lunch followed, then the delegation was treated to a special day at Discovery Center, hosted by the center’s CEO Tara McDougall.

Chinese students, joined by their American counterparts, clearly enjoyed the center’s interactive exhibits, including the large, two-story twisting tube slide. They also got to see and touch animals and reptiles in the center’s collection.

“We want this to be a life-changing experience,” MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee told the delegation at the start of the five-day visit. “You will discover that we live in a beautiful state with a rich history and culture.

“The program that we have put together for you over the next few days will show you the many treasures of Tennessee.”

The university held formal welcoming ceremonies for the delegation July 11 at an evening event at the Student Union Building that featured country-western music, dancing and activities.

They will travel to east Tennessee July 12, where the delegation will visit The Lost Sea attraction, part of the Craighead Caverns near Sweetwater.

On July 13, the delegation will tour Overall Creek Elementary School, view science projects by Scales Elementary School students on display in the lobby of MTSU’s Science Building and learn about MTSU’s partnerships with universities in China.

Chinese school children visiting Murfreesboro as part of an educational and cultural exchange organized by MTSU learned about the Middle Tennessee area from local elementary and high school students during Saturday's opening session at the Embassy Suites Hotel. (MTSU photo)

Chinese youngsters visiting Murfreesboro as part of an educational and cultural exchange organized by MTSU learned about the Middle Tennessee area from local elementary and high school students during a July 11 opening session at the Embassy Suites Hotel. (MTSU photo)

Teachers and administrators from both countries also will huddle that day to exchange ideas and swap classroom experiences, a feature that President McPhee said is the centerpiece of the annual reciprocal visits.

The Confucius Institute, named for the ancient Chinese philosopher Confucius, is sponsored by China’s Education Ministry to promote Chinese language, history and culture through tours, exchanges and university partnerships. There are more than 440 institutes in 120 countries.

Under the leadership of Director Guanping Zheng and Associate Director Yiping Cui, MTSU’s institute has helped teach Chinese language and culture to more than 2,000 students in seven Tennessee counties. It also offers long-distance language training via satellite TV and the Internet.

MTSU joined with Hangzhou Normal to open its institute in 2010. The two partners recently extended their pact for an additional five years.

— Andrew Oppmann (andrew.oppmann@mtsu.edu)


 

MTSU to welcome 30+ Chinese children for cultural exchange

July 10, 2015

MTSU will welcome elementary and middle school children Friday, July 10, from Hangzhou, China, for a five-day visit, marking the fourth year of an education and cultural exchange program organized by the university.

MTSU cheerleaders welcome a delegation of elementary and middle school children and educators from Hangzhou, China, during the group's inaugural visit to campus in July 2013. More youngsters, their parents and teachers will be at MTSU beginning July 10 to develop student exchanges and cultural ties with Tennessee schools. (MTSU file photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU cheerleaders welcome a delegation of elementary and middle school children and educators from Hangzhou, China, during the group’s inaugural visit to campus in July 2013. More youngsters, their parents and teachers will be at MTSU beginning July 10 to develop student exchanges and cultural ties with Tennessee schools. (MTSU file photos by J. Intintoli)

The 30-plus Chinese children, accompanied by parents, teachers and administrators, have a busy first full day planned for Saturday, July 11 — a visit to the Discovery Center at Murfree Spring that afternoon and a formal welcoming ceremony at the Student Union Building that evening.

They will be paired throughout the visit with Rutherford County students who visited Hangzhou in July 2014, a trip that also was facilitated by MTSU’s Confucius Institute. The Confucius Institute works to develop cultural and educational ties between China and the United States.

Hangzhou Normal logoThe visit will be the fourth of the reciprocal exchanges between MTSU and the Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University. Rutherford students visited China in 2012 and 2014, and Dongcheng students first came to the Murfreesboro campus in 2013.

“The university is proud of the continuation of this valuable educational and cultural exchange,” said MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee. “It is a bridge that allows students and educators from both countries to learn from each other.”

The delegation will tour Overall Creek Elementary School, view science projects by Scales Elementary School students on display in the lobby of MTSU’s Science Building and learn about MTSU’s partnerships with universities in China.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, center right, jokes with Liu Jinbin, center left, of the Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University as children and educators from Hangzhou, China, snap photos of a special welcoming cake before enjoying a picnic in July 2013.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, center right, jokes with Liu Jinbin, center left, of the Dongcheng Education Group of Hangzhou Normal University as children and educators from Hangzhou, China, snap photos of a special welcoming cake before enjoying a picnic in July 2013.

McPhee said what makes this exchange unique is the opportunity for teachers and administrators from both counties to collaborate and share ideas.

MTSU Wordmark“This interaction creates opportunities that extend far beyond the visit,” he said.

Chinese students also will visit the homes of local students, tour a farm and participate in educational workshops. They will travel to east Tennessee, where the delegation will visit The Lost Sea attraction, part of the Craighead Caverns near Sweetwater.

The Confucius Institute, named for the ancient Chinese philosopher Confucius, is sponsored by China’s Education Ministry to promote Chinese language, history and culture through tours, exchanges and university partnerships. There are more than 440 institutes in 120 countries.

MTSU joined with Hangzhou Normal to open its institute in 2010.

Under the leadership of Director Guanping Zheng and Associate Director Yiping Cui, MTSU’s institute has helped teach Chinese language and culture to more than 2,000 students in seven Tennessee counties. It also offers long-distance language training via satellite TV and the Internet.

MTSU and Hangzhou Normal recently extended their partnership for an additional five years.

MTSU also announced plans in March to build a Chinese Music and Cultural Center, which will be funded from a $1 million grant from Hanban, the headquarters operation of the Confucius Institutes.

You can watch a video from the Dongcheng Education Group’s first visit to MTSU and Tennessee below.

http://youtu.be/P-isITUXAYM

— Andrew Oppmann (andrew.oppmann@mtsu.edu)

Summer opportunities to visit MTSU abound for prospective students

Prospective MTSU students and their families wanting to visit campus this summer have ample opportunities.

Now through Friday, Aug. 7, campus tours will be offered Monday through Friday starting at 10 a.m. in the Student Services and Admissions Center, 1860 Blue Raider Drive.

MTSU daily campus tours and special Saturday tours are led by Office of Admissions Blue Elite team members like K.G. Kennedy, center, shown in this file photo. (MTSU file photo)

MTSU daily campus tours and special Saturday tours are led by Office of Admissions Blue Elite team members like K.G. Kennedy, center, shown in this file photo. (MTSU file photo)

Special Saturday tours will be offered starting at 10 a.m. July 18 and Aug. 1.

To register, visit www.mtsu.edu/tours.

The daily campus and special Saturday tours include an information session, housing tour and visits inside the Campus Recreation Center, James E. Walker Library, Science Building, John Bragg Mass Communication Building and Business and Aerospace Building.

Housing tours are available each weekday at 12:15 and 3:15 p.m., departing from the Keathley University Center, room 300.  For more information, please call 615-898-2971 or email housing@mtsu.edu.

To find parking and campus buildings, view a printable campus map at www.mtsu.edu/maps.

To contact admissions, call 615-898-2233 or email admissions@mtsu.edu. For questions about tours, call 615-898-5670 or email tours@mtsu.edu.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)