Logo

MTSU Theatre analyzes ‘Einstein’s Dreams’ in 5 performances this week

MTSU Theatre’s performances of “Einstein’s Dreams,” the stage adaptation of an international best-selling novel, will continue as scheduled this week in the university’s Studio Theatre in the Boutwell Dramatic Arts Auditorium.

Last week’s winter weather and the resulting university closures cancelled one performance, but the curtain will go up as planned Wednesday through Sunday, Feb. 25-March 1.

Click on the poster to see a larger version.

Click on the poster to see a larger version.

General admission tickets are $10 each and $5 for K-12 students and senior citizens. MTSU students with valid IDs will be admitted free.

Feb. 25-28 performances begin at 7:30 p.m., and the March 1 matinee begins at 2 p.m. The Studio Theatre in Room 101 seats about 80.

“Einstein’s Dreams,” created by physicist, author and Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Alan Lightman, explores a young Albert Einstein’s reveries about the conception of time while he developed his theory of relativity. Some of the “dreams” are based in fact, while others are fictional.

Memphis native Lightman’s 1992 novel has been used nationwide in university reading programs and was first adapted for the stage in 1996. The play has been presented on numerous stages since then, including at the New York Fringe Festival and in Beijing, China.

Tickets for the MTSU Arts presentations, sponsored by Ascend Federal Credit Union, are available online at www.mtsuarts.com and at the Tucker Theatre box office an hour before curtain times.

Tickets for “Einstein’s Dreams” also can be ordered by phone by calling 888-71-TICKETS (888-718-4253) 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday.

For more information about MTSU Theatre’s current season anytime, visit http://mtsu.edu/theatre/CurrentSeason.php. A printable campus map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParking14-15.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Guest violin-piano duo plans free Feb. 27 performance at MTSU

Violinist Fredi Gerling and pianist Cristina Capparelli will bring their 45-year musical partnership to MTSU Friday, Feb. 27, for a free public recital in Hinton Music Hall inside MTSU’s Wright Music Building.

The duo’s 8 p.m. performance will include Antonin Dvořák’s “Four Romantic Pieces,” Robert Schumann’s “Sonata in D Minor,” M. Camargo Guarnieri’s “Encantamento,” Olivier Messiaen’s “Theme and Variations for Violin and Piano,” and Claude Debussy’s “Sonata in G Minor for Violin and Piano.”

Violinist Fredi Gerling, left, and pianist Cristina Capparelli will present a free public recital Friday, Feb. 27, at 8 p.m. in Hinton Hall inside MTSU's Wright Music Building.

Violinist Fredi Gerling, left, and pianist Cristina Capparelli will present a free public recital Friday, Feb. 27, at 8 p.m. in Hinton Hall inside MTSU’s Wright Music Building.

Gerling, a professor of music at Brazil’s Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, is an award-winning violinist, conductor and educator with an extensive background in chamber music and many years of performing with chamber music groups in the United States and Brazil.

Gerling also led the “Orquestra de Câmara Theatro São Pedro” string orchestra for seven very successful concert seasons.

Capparelli has appeared as a soloist, recitalist, chamber musician, guest teacher and lecturer in the United States, Canada, England, France and Portugal.

Her ongoing research project on Latin American piano music earned her a third Fulbright award in 2014. She also collaborated with MTSU violin professor Andrea Dawson on a recent tour of Brazil.

For details on more MTSU School of Music performances and special events, call 615-898-2493 or visit the “Concert Calendar” link on its website.

You also can find a campus parking map at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParking14-15.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Stones River Chamber Players to premiere new works at Feb. 23 concert

The Stones River Chamber Players, MTSU’s ensemble in residence, will continue their 2014-15 season with a free public concert at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 23, in Hinton Music Hall inside MTSU’s Wright Music Building.

The ensemble members, all of whom teach in MTSU’s School of Music, will present two world premiere works by MTSU composer-in-residence Paul Osterfield.

MTSU music faculty Michael Parkinson, Lalo Davila and Tim Pearson will perform “Lullaby for Michelle,” with Parkinson on trumpet, Davila on percussion and Pearson on double bass. “Seven Bagatelles” will be presented by MTSU music faculty Andrea Dawson on violin, George Riordan on oboe, Christine Kim on cello and Lillian Pearson on piano.

Click on the graphic above to listen to streaming audio performances by the Stones River Chamber Players.

“I am very pleased to have my music return to the Stones River Chamber Players’ programs with these works,” Osterfield said.

“‘Lullaby for Michelle’ is for my daughter, who has been a constant source of joy, laughter and surprises. I composed ‘Seven Bagatelles’ at the request of then-director of the School of Music, George Riordan. I took the concept of the Baroque trio sonata but treated the ensemble with more of a modern flair and approach.”

Along with the premiere performances, the Stones River Chamber Players will present Benjamin Britten’s “Serenade” and Richard Strauss’ “Till Eulenspiegel einmal anders.”

Tenor H. Stephen Smith, pianist Arunesh Nadgir and horn player Angela DeBoer will play “Serenade,” while Dawson, DeBoer and Tim Pearson will be joined by Todd Waldecker on clarinet and Gil Perel on bassoon for the Strauss piece.

“This is a demanding work for both horn and voice,” DeBoer said of “Serenade,” adding that it is “one of the most evocative and intensely beautiful pieces in the repertory. Well worth the effort to perform!”

Waldecker called the Strauss work “a musical fable at its finest!”

The ensemble’s final concert for this season is set for Monday, April 6, at 7:30 p.m. in Hinton Hall.

You can listen to streaming audio performances by the Stones River Chamber Players at www.mtsu.edu/music/srcpabout.php.

For details on more MTSU School of Music performances and special events, call 615-898-2493 or visit the “Concert Calendar” link on its website.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU’s Feb. 21 Flute Festival features guest artists Pope, Charnofsky

The 2015 MTSU Flute Festival, featuring guest artist George Pope, will be held this Saturday, Feb. 21, in the university’s Wright Music Building.

Registration for the event, now in its 15th year, will begin at 8 a.m. Feb. 21.

Pope and guest pianist Eric Charnofsky will present a public recital at 1 p.m. in Hinton Hall inside the Wright building, and Pope will then present a master class for festival participants at 2:15 p.m.

Eric Charnofsky

Eric Charnofsky

George Pope

George Pope

Admission for the MTSU Flute Festival is $20 for early registration or $25 at the door for participating flutists. Members of the public may register as guests for one or all of the public concerts and competitions for a $5-per-person charge.

The day’s events include an 8:30 a.m. opening session in Hinton Hall, which will include a workshop with Nashville flutist Celine Thackston and a session for younger musicians with MTSU instructor Rebecca Murphy. Flute exhibits featuring manufacturers, flute products and flute repair will open at 9 a.m.

Pope will conduct a morning session for festival participants beginning at 9:30 a.m. At 10:30 a.m., the High School Solo Competition, Junior Solo Competition and Orchestral Excerpts Competition will begin.

The festival will conclude with a 4 p.m. final concert featuring the winners of the high school and junior competitions, members of the Festival Flute choir and more.

School of Music new logo webPope, who is emeritus professor of flute at the University of Akron and a flute instructor at Ohio’s Baldwin Wallace University Conservatory of Music, served as principal flute for the Akron Symphony from 1978 to 2002 and also has performed with the Cleveland Orchestra, the Tulsa Philharmonic, the New Mexico Symphony and other organizations.

He is a founding member of the Solaris Wind Quintet and the Chamber Music Society of Ohio, and the Akron Area Arts Alliance named him “Arts Educator of 2009.”

Charnofsky, a pianist, composer and music educator, currently teaches at Case Western Reserve University and has performed throughout North America solo and with organizations including the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the Cleveland Orchestra. The Ohio Music Teachers Association named him “Composer of the Year” for 2012.

For more information about this year’s event, please visit the 2015 MTSU Flute Festival Web page at www.mtsu.edu/flute.

For details on more MTSU School of Music performances and special events, call 615-898-2493 or visit the “Concert Calendar” link on its website.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Edgar Allan Poe’s creations live on at Feb. 18 MTSU symposium

One of America’s great literary geniuses will be explored in depth at “A SymPoesium on Place” Wednesday, Feb. 18, in the Simmons Amphitheatre of MTSU’s Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building.

Click on the poster to see a printable version.

Click on the poster to see a printable version.

Scholars from the United States, Germany and Russia will dissect Edgar Allan Poe’s life and work from perspectives of what place meant to him from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Feb. 18.

The author of poems such as “The Raven” and “Annabel Lee” and tales such as “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” and “The Pit and the Pendulum” is most closely associated with Boston, Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York.

Dr. Harry Lee Poe, an indirect descendant of Edgar Allan Poe and a professor at Union University in Jackson, Tennessee, will describe the author’s concepts of space and science in “Everywhere Man: Poe and the Universe” during the symposium.

“Edgar Allan Poe’s conception of the universe is one that sort of permeates many of his writings,” said Dr. Philip Phillips, associate dean of the University Honors College and a Poe scholar.

Harry Lee Poe also will put some Edgar Allan Poe artifacts from his personal collection on display from noon to 6 p.m. in the fourth-floor special collections area of the James E. Walker Library. At 5 p.m., Harry Lee Poe will describe his artifacts with a gallery talk; a brief reception will follow.

Dr. Harry Lee Poe

Dr. Harry Lee Poe

An interview with Harry Lee Poe about the symposium will air at 8 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 15, on “MTSU On the Record” on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ). The audio from that interview will be posted at www.mtsunews.com later that week.

Edgar Allan Poe’s place in popular culture is unmistakable. His image is on the cover of The Beatles’ “Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” album; a new off-Broadway musical, “Nevermore: The Imaginary Life and Mysterious Death of Edgar Allan Poe,” is getting reviews as both “bleak” and “stylish.”

Numerous movies have been based on Poe’s works. “The Raven” inspired both a rock song by The Alan Parsons Project and the name of the National Football League’s Baltimore franchise.

“There’s a lot more to Poe than spooky tales and horror,” said Phillips. “Behind that is a mind that is concerned with literary effect, with beauty and with the meaning of sound and poetry. There’s a lot of complexity to his work on just about every level.”

Dr. Philip Phillips

Dr. Philip Phillips

The French poet Charles Baudelaire saw Poe as a perpetual outsider, “a figure who was unappreciated by a predominantly commercial and materialistic American society,” said Phillips.

Although Poe was only 40 when he died in 1849 under circumstances that are as mysterious as any of his writings, he was very prolific.

“He had to write for the popular audience to a large degree, which helps to account for the wide range of literary works that he produced,” Phillips said.

“A SymPoesium on Place” and the display of Poe artifacts in the James E. Walker Library are free and open to the public. The event is sponsored by the University Honors College, the Virginia Peck Fund and the MTSU chapter of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi.

“We want the symposium to be something that people who have any level of interest in Poe to enjoy,” said Phillips.

For more information, contact Phillips at 615-898-2699 or philip.phillips@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU campaign raises awareness about women’s heart health

Nearly 120 people from the campus community — including 20 preschoolers from the MTSU Child Care Lab — were decked out in red attire Feb. 6 in the Science Building.

All of them appeared as part of the universitywide call for support for the observance of the American Heart Association’s National Wear Red Day

To raise awareness about women’s heart health, MTSU Health Services and Health Promotion invited people to wear anything red and come for a heart-shaped photo in the Liz and Creighton Rhea Atrium.

Including 20 youngsters from the MTSU Child Care Lab, more than 100 people from the campus community turned out for National Wear Red Day Friday, Feb. 6, in the Liz and Creighton Rhea Atrium in the Science Building. The American Heart Association-related event promotes awareness for women's heart health. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

Including 20 youngsters from the MTSU Child Care Lab, more than 100 people from the campus community turned out for National Wear Red Day Friday, Feb. 6, in the Liz and Creighton Rhea Atrium in the Science Building. The American Heart Association-related event promotes awareness for women’s heart health. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

“I think peoples’ hearts were touched by heart disease in their families, with either their mothers, grandmothers or sisters having had procedures, or maybe they lost someone to heart disease,” said Rick Chapman, director of Health Services, “so they were wearing red to support this and to encourage other women to go get checked out.”

Chapman said he was thankful for the appearance by the children. He also thanked College of Basic and Applied Sciences Dean Bud Fischer for opening the atrium and MTSU Event Coordination staffers for helping organize the event.

“The Science Building is a great spot for this,” Chapman said.

Health Promotion Director Lisa Schrader said heart disease isn’t just a concern for men.

“Heart disease and stroke kill one in three women, yet these problems can be preventable,” she said. “In fact, 80 percent of cardiac events can be prevented with education and lifestyle changes.”

For anyone unable to attend the event, Schrader said they can still GO RED:

  • Get your numbers: Ask your doctor to check your blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose.
  • Own your lifestyle: Stop smoking, lose weight, be physically active and eat healthy.
  • Raise your voice: Advocate for more women-related research and education.
  • Educate your family: Make healthy food choices for you and your family. Teach your children the importance of staying active.
  • Donate: Show your support with a donation of time or money.

To learn more about the national movement, visit www.goredforwomen.org/wearredday.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU Honors College hosts prospective students Feb. 16

High school and transfer students and their families from across Tennessee and beyond are invited to the sixth annual MTSU Honors College Presidents’ Day Open House.

The event, which will begin in the Student Union Ballroom and eventually move to the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building and other campus venues, will be held from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Feb. 16. A printable campus map can be found at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParking14-15.

In this February 2014 file photo, MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee answers a question from Janie Kullmar of Siegel High School in Murfreesboro at the University Honors College Presidents’ Day Open House. This year’s open house will be held from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Feb. 16. (MTSU file photo by J. Intintoli)

In this February 2014 file photo, MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee answers a question from Janie Kullmar of Siegel High School in Murfreesboro at the University Honors College Presidents’ Day Open House. A Buchanan Fellow Scholarship recipient, Kullmar is a freshman majoring in communication disorders. This year’s open house will be held from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Feb. 16. (MTSU file photo by J. Intintoli)

To register and for more information online, visit the Honors College website http://www.mtsu.edu/honors/OpenHouse.php or the Office of Admissions website http://www.mtsu.edu/schedule-a-visit/special-events.php.

The University Honors College fosters the academic excellence and nurturing environment of a small, select, private liberal arts college within the setting of a major university, said Laura Clippard, Honors College academic adviser.

The Honors College also provides expert faculty, unique curricular and extracurricular experiences and “Collage,” an award-winning arts and literary magazine.

“It will be a day filled with educational opportunities,” Clippard said. “Prospective students will have a chance to meet advisers and experience a slice of university life.”

During the day, attendees will have the opportunity to hear College of Basic and Applied Sciences Dean Bud Fischer talk about science and opportunities in the Science Building; witness a mock trial demonstration; see and hear a “mad scientist” demonstration from Department of Physics and Astronomy professor Eric Klumpe and take aerospace and library tours.

“There will be quite a bit of variety for the day,” Clippard said. “We receive a tremendous amount of support from the colleges and departments in helping to showcase the best options for future MTSU students.”

To help conclude their visit at 3 p.m., participants will have a chance to attend a spring semester Honors Lecture Series with the theme of “Native American Culture.”

For more information, call 615-898-5464 or email Clippard at Laura.Clippard@mtsu.edu.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

2015 Honors Open House Poster web

Feb. 13 big-band reunion concert to benefit MTSU jazz scholarship fund

Treat your valentine to a big-band jazz reunion at MTSU Friday, Feb. 13, when “The Return of the Blues Crusade” celebrates 40 years of jazz at MTSU with a concert by students, alumni and faculty.

Members of MTSU's "Blues Crusade," also known as the MTSU Jazz Ensemble 1 of top student musicians, poses for a group photo inside the new music building in this early 1980s photo. The building was named for professors Neil and Margaret Wright in 1986. (photo courtesy of MTSU School of Music)

Members of MTSU’s “Blues Crusade,” also known as the MTSU Jazz Ensemble 1 of top student musicians, poses for a group photo inside the new music building in this early 1980s photo. The building was named for professors Neil and Margaret Wright in 1986. (photo courtesy of MTSU School of Music)

Admission for the 7:30 p.m. concert in Hinton Hall inside the university’s Wright Music Building is $10 for adults and $5 for non-MTSU students. MTSU students, faculty and staff may attend free. All proceeds will benefit MTSU’s John and Bobbie Duke Woodwind Jazz Scholarship Fund.

Dr. John Duke, the founding director of jazz studies at MTSU and the MTSU jazz ensemble known as The Blues Crusade, will direct the three groups in concert with help from current jazz professors Jamey Simmons and Don Aliquo.

This inaugural big-band reunion, part of the university’s Jazz Artist Series, kicks off with the current MTSU Jazz Ensemble I, the university’s top performing ensemble of experienced students, under Simmons’ direction. The Alumni Jazz Band, featuring players from 1993 to 2014 and directed by Aliquo, will follow in the concert lineup.

jazz studies logo webThe Blues Crusade, led by Duke, will close the performance. They will feature vocals by Denise Huffington Patton backed by the all-star band recreating music from Count Basie, Woody Herman and Stan Kenton.

School of Music new logo webThis is the first reunion for students and faculty in MTSU’s jazz studies program since it was established in 1973. MTSU alumni who were part of the jazz ensembles are being invited to perform and will gather for the first time at 6 p.m. before the concert.

Jazz enthusiasts and MTSU supporters are also being asked to make a tax-deductible donation to the John and Bobbie Duke Woodwind Jazz Scholarship endowment to help future jazz students reach the same success as the alumni.

You can learn more about MTSU’s jazz studies program at www.mtsu.edu/music/jazzpage.php.

For more information on this and other concerts in the MTSU School of Music, call 615-898-2493 or visit the School of Music’s “Concert Calendar” link.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU, Leadership Music welcome Nashville execs to pre-Grammys party

LOS ANGELES — MTSU teamed with Nashville-based Leadership Music on Sunday, Feb. 8, for a reception for Music City artists and recording executives just hours before the start of the Grammy Awards.

The event at Rock’N Fish Restaurant, outside Staples Center where the Grammys were later televised, capped two days of activities in the Los Angeles area by MTSU’s College of Mass Communication to underscore the national profile of its recording industry program.

In ceremonies before the prime-time broadcast, MTSU alumni Torrance “Street Symphony” Esmond and Lecrae Moore won a Grammy for Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song as co-writers on the song “Messengers.” Moore, a Christian hip-hop artist, performed the song on his “Anomaly” album with fellow artists For King & Country.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, right, pauses with Diane Pearson, president of Nashville-based Leadership Music and an executive with City National Bank, for a photo duering MTSU’s pre-Grammy event Feb. 8 in Los Angeles. (MTSU photo by Andrew Oppmann)

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, right, pauses with Diane Pearson, president of Nashville-based Leadership Music and an executive with City National Bank, for a photo duering MTSU’s pre-Grammy event Feb. 8 in Los Angeles. (MTSU photo by Andrew Oppmann)

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, along with College of Mass Communication Dean Ken Paulson and Beverly Keel, Department of Recording Industry chair, greeted Leadership Music alumni at the event. Many of the guests also were former MTSU students of the university. The annual leadership program brings together leaders within the music community to discuss issues currently affecting the music industry.

“Our partnership with Leadership Music is valuable in so many ways,” McPhee said. “It affords opportunities like this for our faculty and students to connect with Music City’s top executives and influencers.”

Paulson said the college’s presence in southern California sends a strong signal to those working in the music business.

“We deeply value our rich relationship with Leadership Music and its support for our students,” he said.

Leadership Music alumni come from all genres of music within both the creative and business segments of the industry as well partners from the nonprofit, business, educational or legislative communities. Paulson has served as a member of its board and executive committee, and Keel is a graduate, former board member and former secretary of the program.

“MTSU is a valued partner and friend and we appreciate its help in staging this great event before the Grammy Awards,” said Diane Pearson, president of Leadership Music and an executive with City National Bank. “It means a great deal to have the university’s leadership here today.”

Meanwhile, inside Staples Center, MTSU alumnus Garry Hood was serving as head stage manager for the 57th annual Grammy ceremony.

Hood, a 1997 graduate, has served as head stage manager for more than 1,000 hours of network television specials, including Olympic opening and closing ceremonies, presidential inaugurals, the Kennedy Center Honors and Super Bowl halftime shows as well as most major entertainment awards ceremonies.

“We are proud of Garry and all of our alumni, faculty and friends who are connected to the music’s biggest event,” McPhee said.

You can read about MTSU’s Grammy winners and nominees here and about more special Grammy events here.

— Andrew Oppmann (andrew.oppmann@mtsu.edu)

New faculty pianist plans ‘great masterworks’ in Feb. 9 MTSU concert

Concert pianist Adam Clark, a new faculty member in MTSU’s School of Music, will include “some of the great masterworks of the classical piano tradition” in his first solo concert at the university Monday, Feb. 9.

The free public concert is set to begin at 8 p.m. Feb. 9 in Hinton Music Hall inside MTSU’s Wright Music Building. You can find a printable campus map at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap14-15.

Dr. Adam Clark

Dr. Adam Clark

Clark plans to perform “Partita No. 4 in D Major” by J. S. Bach, “Chester: Variations for Piano” by William Schuman and “Sonata No. 2 in B-Flat Minor” by Sergei Rachmaninoff.

“I am very much looking forward to this performance,” said Clark. “The music I am playing is very special to me, as many of the pieces are works that first inspired me to become a pianist.”

Calling the music “some of the great masterworks of the classical piano tradition,” Clark noted that Bach’s “Partita” features “some of his most expressive, engaging and brilliant writing for the keyboard. The Rachmaninoff, on the other hand, is a tour de force of Romanticism and pianistic bravura. It is an incredibly exciting and beautiful piece, and I am very much looking forward to playing it.”

School of Music new logo webThe new faculty member said Schuman’s variations aren’t often performed.

“It was the commissioned work for the 1989 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition,” Clark explained, “and it has been a favorite of mine ever since I first heard it. It is quite challenging, however — perhaps the reason it is not played often — and my performance at MTSU will be the first time I am playing it in public.”

Clark has performed as a soloist, chamber musician and concerto soloist throughout the United States as well as in Belgium, Italy and South Korea. His performances have been broadcast on U.S. public radio and South Korean TV.

A prizewinner in numerous competitions, Clark has performed as a soloist in venues including New York’s Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, the Aronoff Center in Cincinnati, Bass Concert Hall in Austin, Texas, and the Royce Auditorium in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Clark came to MTSU from Michigan’s Hope College and has taught at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music and the University of Texas at Austin. He’s an associate professor of piano in the School of Music and also serves as co-vice president of the Middle Tennessee Music Teachers Association.

For more information on this and other concerts in the MTSU School of Music, call 615-898-2493 or visit the “Concert Calendar” page.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)