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MTSU hosts tail-wagging 5K trek April 30 to benefit Habitat for Humanity

Human walkers and runners are invited to accompany their furry, four-footed canine companions in the annual fundraiser for Habitat for Humanity set Sunday, April 30, on the MTSU campus.

Two- and four-legged participants make their way around Old Main Circle at MTSU in the 2016 "See Spot Run" 5K Run/Walk for Habitat for Humanity. The 2017 event is set Sunday, April 30. (Photo courtesy of MTSU See Spot Run)

Two- and four-legged participants make their way around Old Main Circle at MTSU in the 2016 “See Spot Run” 5K Run/Walk for Habitat for Humanity. The 2017 event is set Sunday, April 30. (Photo courtesy of MTSU See Spot Run)

The 12th annual See Spot Run 5K Run/Walk, sponsored by the MTSU Office of Student Organizations and Service and the MTSU chapter of Sigma Pi Fraternity, is slated for 8 a.m. April 30.

Registration will begin at 6:45 a.m. race day at Peck Hall. The entry fee before Monday, April 24, is $30, and on race day, the fee will be $35.

Each entry fee includes dry-fit style shirts for all participants and awards for the top age-group finishers. All proceeds will support the MTSU Habitat Blitz Build and Rutherford County Habitat for Humanity.

A discounted group rate of $25 per person is available for organizations that have 15 or more participants. Organizations must pre-register by 4:30 p.m. April 24 in Room 330 of the MTSU Student Union to qualify for the discount.

Although participants aren’t required to run or walk with a dog to enter, those who do bring their pets must provide valid rabies tag numbers. Retractable leashes are prohibited.

See Spot Run logo web

Chip timing is available for all participants. A map of the race route is available online here.

Racers may register online at www.active.com or by mailing in a printable registration form, found here, with payment to MTSU, 1301 E. Main St., P. O. Box 39, Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37132.

For more information, contact the Office of Student Organizations and Service at 615-898-5812 or visit www.mtsu.edu/sos/see-spot-run.php.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU plans Veteran and Family Benefits Expo for community April 22

Veterans at MTSU and across the Middle Tennessee region are welcome to attend the Veteran and Family Benefits Expo, which will be held from 2 to 6 p.m. Saturday, April 22, on campus, event organizers said.

The benefits expo featuring at least 20 vendors will be held outside the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center, 1848 Blue Raider Drive, on the east side of campus in Murfreesboro.

Veteran and Family Benefits Expo in the Campus Rec Center.

Veteran and Family Benefits Expo in the Campus Rec Center.

In the event of rain, activities will move inside one of the Campus Recreation Center gymnasiums. To find the rec center and nearby parking, visit http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Sponsored by The Journey Home Project, MTSU Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veteran and Military Family Center and June Anderson Center for Women and Nontraditional Students, the expo is held to help veterans and their family members be aware of available assistance

“We welcome people from the community and campus, and want them to bring their families,” said Heather Conrad, counselor and rehabilitation counselor for VetSuccess on Campus.

Veteran service providers will include Greenhouse Ministries, Waffle House, Two Men and a Truck, Vietnam Veterans of America, Tennessee Department of Labor Mobile “Career Coach,” Tennessee Valley Health Services Women’s Health Center, Rolling Thunder Inc., Whelen Security, Wounded Warrior Project, Veterans Recovery Center/Mental Health Counsel and more.

Food is being provided by The Journey Home Project and will be served from 4 to 6 p.m.

Families are welcome to utilize the rec center’s indoor pool during the event.

The event will be hosted by the Blue Raider American Veteran Organization, or BRAVO, Tennessee Department of Labor, VetSuccess of Campus, Veterans Benefits Administration and Veterans Health Administration.

For more information, call 615-898-2974 or 615-898-2540.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Psychologists, students discuss narcissism, research at spring meeting

The Middle Tennessee Psychological Association will explore the psychology of narcissism this Saturday, April 22, when MTSU hosts the group’s spring 2017 meeting.

Dr. Alexander Jackson

Dr. Alexander Jackson

Dr. Alexander T. Jackson, an assistant professor of psychology at MTSU, will deliver the keynote address, “Why and When Narcissists Dismiss Advice,” at 10 a.m. April 22 in the State Farm Lecture Hall of the Business and Aerospace Building.

A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

“People often pay incredible sums of money to acquire advice, and, when used, advice tends to lead to more optimal decision-making,” said Jackson. “However, some people seem entirely unwilling to use advice.”

The gathering of the regional group, which is slated for 8:30 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. and is open to the public, will enable MTSU psychology majors to display their posters, discuss their research with academics and other professionals and to make valuable contacts that could benefit them in their post-college careers.

“The meeting provides an excellent opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to present their efforts to colleagues from other colleges and universities,” said Dr. William Langston, an MTSU psychology professor.

The registration fee is $5 for students and community members and $15 for faculty and professionals. Community college and high-school students may attend for free if they register in advance.

All conference events will take place in the Business and Aerospace Building. For more information, contact Langston at 615-898-5489 or william.langston@mtsu.edu. Online registration is closed, but participants may register on site.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU artists welcome season at Spring Dance Concert April 20-22

MTSU’s dance students, faculty and guest artists are celebrating a fresh new season at the annual Spring Dance Concert, which is set Thursday through Saturday, April 20-22, in the university’s Tucker Theatre.

MTSU Dance Theatre company members Quinn Cunningham, left, and Saul Rodriguez prepare for the April 20-22 Spring Dance Concert in the university’s Tucker Theatre. (Photo courtesy of Martin O’Connor)

MTSU Dance Theatre company members Quinn Cunningham, left, and Saul Rodriguez prepare for the April 20-22 Spring Dance Concert in the university’s Tucker Theatre. (Photo courtesy of Martin O’Connor)

Performances begin at 7 each evening. General-admission tickets for the Spring Dance Concert are $10 for adults and $5 for K-12 students and MTSU staff. MTSU students will be admitted free with a valid student ID.

This year’s Spring Dance Concert will once again highlight original choreographic works from MTSU dance faculty and selected students and from guest artist Banning Bouldin, an internationally recognized choreographer and artistic director of the Nashville-based New Dialect company, who visited the MTSU Dance Program in March.

The event also will feature pieces that display the scope of MTSU’s dance training and the talents of the university’s dance faculty in contemporary ballet, jazz and modern dance.

MTSU dance faculty member Meg Brooker has restaged three original Isadora Duncan choreographies, presented as “Suite from Orfeo ed Eurydice,” for the spring dance concert.

Marsha Barsky, artistic director of MTSU Dance Theatre, will present an excerpt of “Leaving Home,” a piece she choreographed that also features music by MTSU jazz faculty members Jamey Simmons and Don Aliquo.

Spring Dance Concert 2017 card webThe program also will include works by dance faculty Jennifer McNamara, Windship Boyd and Chell Parkins and by MTSU senior Amber Jordan.

“The MTSU Dance Theatre aims to enrich our campus and local community’s appreciation of concert dance by providing high-quality performances,” Barsky said. “The Spring Dance Concert reflects the dynamic range and diversity of our program.”

Tickets can be purchased online at www.mtsuarts.com or at the door. The Tucker Theatre Box Office will open one hour before each performance for ticket purchases.

A searchable campus map with parking details is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

For more information about the 2017 Spring Dance Concert, visit the MTSU Dance Theatre website at www.mtsu.edu/dance or call 615-494-8810.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Friday Star Party features ‘Great Tennessee Eclipse at MTSU’

Associate professor Chuck Higgins’ discussion for the Friday, April 14, MTSU Physics and Astronomy Star Party focuses on this summer’s solar eclipse, whose path will go directly across Nashville.

Tennessee Eclipse map w MTSU marked“The 2017 Great Tennessee Eclipse at MTSU” star party will begin at 6:30 p.m. in Room 102 of Wiser-Patten Science Hall. A telescope viewing will follow the 45- to 60-minute lecture.

The star parties are always free and open to the public. To find Wiser-Patten Science Hall and nearby parking, visit http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Dr. Chuck Higgins

Dr. Chuck Higgins

The April Star Party is part of the Alumni Spring Showcase, which includes dozens of events and activities for MTSU students, alumni and friends of the university.

The eclipse will occur Monday, Aug. 21. For Nashville, the largest U.S. city wholly within the path of the eclipse, the event should begin around 1:28 p.m. and last nearly two minutes. Because of the path of the eclipse, it is considered a 100-year event.

“The moon will pass directly between the Earth and the sun, and the shadow of the moon will follow a path across the continental United States from Oregon to South Carolina,” Higgins said. “This is a once-in-a-lifetime event.”

On Aug. 21, MTSU will host a public viewing session at the MTSU observatory.

“We will have telescopes set up for safe viewing and special glasses for viewing the sun will be available to borrow or for sale,” Higgins said, adding MTSU physics and astronomy students and faculty will be available to answer questions.

School groups will be invited to attend that day. Higgins said they plan to livestream the event and provide links to education activities at www.mtsu.edu/eclipse.

“Funky Fizix in Film” will be Dr. Eric Klumpe’s topic for the Friday, May 5, MTSU Star Party.  You can get a preview of the events and more information about the eclipse from Higgins and Klumpe in the video below.

For more information, call 615-898-2483 or 615-898-5946 or visit www.mtsu.edu/programs/astronomy and www.mtsu.edu/programs/physics.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU ag students show youngsters the origins of their food [+VIDEO]

G’Anni Milton, Tinsley Pittenger and Allison Swenson and nearly 900 other Rutherford County schools students had no idea how much MTSU senior Austin Brennstuhl wants them to know where their food comes from — and he doesn’t mean the grocery store.

The children from 10 schools across the county learned about farm life Tuesday, April 11, during the fourth annual MTSU Agricultural Education “Spring Fling” in the Tennessee Livestock Center.

Between 1,000 and 1,200 people participated in the MTSU agritourism class-led field trip to show the youngsters all kinds of farm animals and products, including vegetables and chocolate milk from the university’s dairy.

Brennstuhl, 23, from Eagleville, served as student coordinator for the event, which is operated by the agritourism class led by instructor Alanna Vaught. He said he wishes the ag spring fling could expand. The one-day event currently must limit attendance to a first-come, first-served basis.

“My heart has always been here,” said Brennstuhl, who was an agritourism class member in 2016.

MTSU student Rachel Elrod tells the school children about the natural honey that comes from bees. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

MTSU student Rachel Elrod tells the young visitors about the natural honey that comes from bees. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

“It’s what I’ve always loved — to teach kids about a lost time. … I would love to see this grow bigger and longer, add days, even having special-needs children come and get the same experience.”

The children — from Eagleville, Walter Hill, Kittrell, Buchanan, La Vergne Lake, Thurman Francis, Campus, Middle Tennessee Christian and McFadden schools — saw two corn mazes, a cornhole game, a barrel-racing horse and about 10 other animal friends, farm equipment and a beekeeping demonstration during their visit.

Milton, 4, a Kittrell Elementary kindergarten student whose mother, Monique Alsup, served a a chaperone, said she enjoyed the playground and “picked all kinds of fruit and vegetables and eggs, too.”
Pittenger, 8, a second-grader at Eagleville, said she had “a lot of fun … milking the cow, the corn maze and seeing all the animals, especially the horse.”

Swenson, 7, a second-grader at Walter Hill Elementary, liked “petting the animals, and the maze, picking the fruit and vegetables, and learning about bees.”

Nearly halfway through the event, Vaught said it appeared that everything was running smoothly. One of her checklist items was participant safety, so a student who is a registered nurse and several other students with CPR training were available during the event to help as needed.

“You want students to enjoy the experience and not be bored,” she said.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU School of Agribusiness and Agriscience student Detorie Walker uses a small ear of corn to inform the children about this popular vegetable.

MTSU School of Agribusiness and Agriscience student Detorie Walker uses a small ear of corn in a discussion with the children about the vegetable.

MTSU Ag Education Spring Fling Director Alanna Vaught informs school children about things that live and grown on a farm.

MTSU Ag Education Spring Fling Director Alanna Vaught tells children what lives and grows on a farm.

MTSU recruiters ‘Paint Your Future True Blue’ at Motlow College

Middle Tennessee State University continues its “Paint Your Future True Blue” spring tour with upcoming visits to Motlow College’s main campuses.

MTSU recruiters will travel to Tullahoma, Tennessee, Tuesday, April 11, and to Motlow’s Smyrna, Tennessee, campus Wednesday, April 19. In between, a visit is planned for a “paint” event at Chattanooga State Thursday, April 13. All visits are from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. local time.

T-shirts signify Motlow College students made MTSU their choice during the first "Paint the Community College True Blue" tour at the Lynchburg, Tenn., campus, in this March 2015 file photo. (MTSU file photo by David Foster)

T-shirts signify Motlow College students made MTSU their choice during the first “Paint the Community College True Blue” tour at the Lynchburg, Tenn., campus, in this March 2015 file photo. (MTSU file photo by David Foster)

University recruiters and other staff have been visiting community colleges across the state in order to recruit students who will be graduating and want to continue their higher education at MTSU.

‘We are hosting these events on the community college campuses in an attempt to bring MTSU to the students,” said Mark Murphy, coordinator of enrollment in the Office of Admissions.

Admissions representatives will be available to answer questions and discuss the transferring process, Murphy added.

“We will also have a representative from the MT One Stop on hand to field questions regarding financial aid, scholarships and more,” he said.

“Our mission is to bridge the gap from the community college and MTSU and hopefully make the transition from their current school to MTSU a smooth one once they have earned their two-year degrees.”

At the event, admitted students can get an MTSU ID card, learn more about Tennessee Transfer Pathways and other programs to help them successfully transfer and register for the Finish Line Scholarship. For more information, visit www.mtsu.edu/financial-aid/scholarships/transfer-finish-line.php.

MTSU’s other “paint” stops in Tennessee have included Pellissippi State in Knoxville; Nashville State; Volunteer State in Gallatin; and Jackson State.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

 

Grammy nominee Allyson joins MTSU students, faculty for April 11 concert

Five-time Grammy nominee Karrin Allyson will join the MTSU Singers and MTSU jazz faculty musicians in a special public concert set Tuesday, April 11, in Hinton Music Hall inside the university’s Wright Music Building.

Karrin Allyson

Karrin Allyson

General admission tickets for the April 11 concert are $10, and high school student tickets are $5 each; all will be available at the door. MTSU students, faculty and staff can attend free with valid IDs.

A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

The MTSU Singers are an audition-only select group of up to 16 student vocalists who perform jazz standards and jazz-style arrangements of popular music, including choral jazz and vocal improvisation.

Joining Allyson and the MTSU Singers will be MTSU faculty members Matt Endahl on piano, Chip Henderson on guitar, Jim Ferguson on bass and Derrek Phillips on drums.

The MTSU Singers, shown in this spring 2017 photo from the group’s Facebook page, will perform Tuesday, April 11, in concert with five-time Grammy nominee Karrin Allyson and members of MTSU’s jazz faculty in Hinton Music Hall inside the university’s Wright Music Building. They’re led by MTSU music professor Cedric Dent, an emeritus member of the 10-time Grammy-winning a capella group Take Six. (Photo courtesy of MTSU Singers)

The MTSU Singers, shown in this spring 2017 photo from the group’s Facebook page, will perform Tuesday, April 11, in concert with five-time Grammy nominee Karrin Allyson and members of MTSU’s jazz faculty in Hinton Music Hall inside the university’s Wright Music Building. They’re led by MTSU music professor Cedric Dent, an emeritus member of the 10-time Grammy-winning a capella group Take Six. (Photo courtesy of MTSU Singers)

“It is a great honor to welcome Karrin, one of the very best jazz vocalists, to MTSU to perform with our jazz singers and jazz faculty,” said Dr. Michael Parkinson, director of the MTSU School of Music, who’s known Allyson since his teaching years in Kansas City.

Dr. Michael Parkinson

Dr. Michael Parkinson

“I have followed her career as it has grown from regional to national to international recognition of her skills. She is a dynamic singer and pianist, a great communicator, and devoted to helping students pursue their career goals.”

School of Music new logo webAllyson has 16 albums to her credit, and five have received Grammy nominations for best jazz vocal album since 2001, including “Ballads: Remembering John Coltrane,” “Footprints,” “Imagina: Songs of Brasil,” “’Round Midnight” and “Many a New Day: Karrin Allyson Sings Rodgers & Hammerstein.”

She lives in New York City and currently spends two days out of three on tour, playing major jazz festivals, concert venues and clubs across the United States, Brazil, Japan, Australia and Europe. Allyson also was a featured vocalist in the “Newport Jazz Festival: Now 60” U.S. and Canadian tour in 2014.

“Karrin brings a wealth of experience to MTSU for her first appearance here,” said Parkinson. “You will not want to miss this! We also appreciate the support of John and Bobbie Duke in helping to underwrite this event.”

For details on more MTSU School of Music performances, call 615-898-2493 or visit the Concert Calendar online.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU LGBT+ College Conference welcomes ‘all identities’ April 6-8

A leader in developing partnerships between major corporations and minority business enterprises in three Southern states will deliver the awards dinner keynote address at MTSU’s annual LGBT+ College Conference, which is set for April 6-8 across campus.

Click on the banner for a full 2017 conference schedule.

Click on the banner for a full 2017 conference schedule.

Eric Watson, president and chief executive officer of the Carolinas-Virginia Minority Development Council, will speak at the conference awards dinner set for 7 p.m. Saturday, April 8, in the James Union Building’s Tennessee Room.

Eric Watson

Eric Watson

Watson’s nonprofit organization has more than 175 corporations and 430 certified minority business enterprises in North Carolina, South Carolina and central Virginia as members.

The theme of this year’s conference is “All Identities — Removing Obstacles to Inclusion.”

Research presentations, workshops, and discussions will focus on how gender, race, culture, ethnicity, age, social class, religious beliefs, sexual orientation and gender identity or expression play a significant role in how people experience the world.

Tara Prairie, an MTSU doctoral candidate, will present her research into stigmas faced by the sexual and gender minority community in health care in a 12:15 p.m. address Thursday, April 6, in the Tennessee Room.

The conference film festival will begin at 6:30 p.m. Thursday in the Keathley University Center Theater. Original short films pertaining to the conference theme will be screened and judged.

Tara Prairie

Tara Prairie

“It’s listed on a national film festival website, and it’s gotten submissions from across the globe,” said Dr. William Langston, conference organizer and psychology professor.

“LGBT Life in Middle Tennessee Before Stonewall,” a documentary featuring interviews with 28 subjects ranging in age from 63 to 85, will be screened during an 11 a.m. luncheon Friday, April 7, in Ballrooms A and B of the Student Union. A panel discussion and question-and-answer session will follow the screening.

David Jay

David Jay

David Jay, founder of www.asexuality.org, will talk about the history and politics of the asexual, grey-a, and demisexual communities at 10:45 a.m. Saturday in Room 160 in the College of Education Building. The emphasis will be on challenging a view of emotional intimacy that is centered on sex.

“What we’re trying to do is to get campuses to be aware, get student organizations to be aware that these are students who are covered under LGBT+ and should be included in their groups,” said Langston.

Other conference events will focus on how employers address diversity issues, the LGBT+ community and people of color, personal reflections on obstacles to inclusion, how to bring an LGBT+ event to campus and helping student organizations preserve their history.

Sponsors of the LGBT+ College Conference include Nissan, First Tennessee Bank, the MTSU Office of Institutional Equity and Compliance and the law firm of Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis LLP.

MT Lambda 25th anniversary logo webAdditional supporters include Dell, Hilton Garden Inn, the United States Secret Service, the MTSU Distinguished Lecture Fund, and the College of Behavioral and Health Science’s Departments of Psychology, Social Work, and Health and Human Performance.

All conference events except the awards dinner are free and open to the public. Students can attend the dinner free; public admission is $50. Registration, which is free, is required.

For a complete conference schedule and registration information, visit www.mtsu.edu/mtlambda/LGBTplusCC.php. A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

For more information, contact Langston at 615-898-5489 or william.langston@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Get your tickets for April 12 ‘True Blue Night’ with Nashville Sounds

The Nashville Sounds will celebrate Middle Tennessee State University on Wednesday, April 12, with its third annual True Blue Night at First Tennessee Park.

The Sounds are offering discounted tickets to the MTSU community. Tickets are $8 plus tax and fees and can be purchased here. Use the discount code: trueblue17.

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

First-pitch is at 6:35 p.m., with gates opening at 5:35. The first 1,000 fans in the stadium will get a True Blue-branded Nashville Sounds baseball cap.

Sounds-wordmark-webMTSU President Sidney A. McPhee will be throwing the ceremonial first pitch, while MTSU student Ashley Nite will be singing the national anthem. Nite is a vocalist for the alternative rock band “Reign,” which is managed by the MTSU Department of Recording Industry’s student-run label Match Records.

Miss MTSU Kristen Perry will lead “Take Me Out To The Ballgame” and Blue Raider mascot Lightning will be on hand to welcome fans and provide in-game entertainment along with the Sounds’ mascot Booster.

Additionally, the MTSU Ticket Office, Blue Raider Athletic Association and College of Graduate Studies will be on hand with promotional items as well as graduate program, BRAA membership and football ticket package information.

The first 1,000 fans entering First Tennessee Park April 12 will get a True Blue-branded Nashville Sounds baseball cap in recognition of “True Blue Night” at the stadium. (Submitted photo)

The first 1,000 fans entering First Tennessee Park April 12 will get a True Blue-branded Nashville Sounds baseball cap in recognition of “True Blue Night” at the stadium. (Submitted photo)

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