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Interior design students host MTSU ‘garden party’ Sept. 29 at Oaklands

MTSU’s student chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers is taking the community into the garden with its fall 2016 lecture, “The Garden Party: Celebration of the Domestic Arts,” set Thursday, Sept. 29.

This corset, created by MTSU Textiles, Merchandising and Design Program Coordinator Gina Pisut and modeled by an MTSU student, will be on display at “The Garden Party: Celebration of the Domestic Arts” Sept. 29 at Oaklands Mansion. (photos submitted)

This corset, created by MTSU Textiles, Merchandising and Design Program Coordinator Gina Pisut and modeled by an MTSU student, will be on display at “The Garden Party: Celebration of the Domestic Arts” Sept. 29 at Oaklands Mansion. (photos submitted)

The event, which is set for 6 p.m. in Maney Hall at Oaklands Mansion, 900 N. Maney Ave. in Murfreesboro, will be preceded by a 5 p.m. reception catered by McAlister’s.

The lecture and reception are free and open to the public.

“Who doesn’t like to dress up a little bit, put on a pretty hat and have a nice morning or afternoon in the garden?” said Deborah Belcher, chair of MTSU’s Department of Human Sciences and a registered interior designer.

Belcher and two of her colleagues will impart their wisdom on both historical and contemporary elements of garden parties and display examples of their own work.

Gina Pisut, coordinator of the university’s Textiles, Merchandising and Design Program — also known as TXMD — will examine corsetry. Lauren Rudd, assistant professor in the TXMD program, will talk about quilting, and Belcher will address floral arrangements.

Belcher said the artistry and craftsmanship of these creative expressions are only part of the emphasis on home, hearth, shelter, food and relationships that characterize human sciences.

Deborah Belcher

Deborah Belcher

“We’re showing just three examples of the multiple domestic arts that are out there,” said Belcher. “We’re looking at our history but also who we are today in human sciences.”

During the event, an array of historic quilts will be on display in Maney Hall, and a gallery show of all three professors’ handiwork will be on display in the mansion itself.

Belcher said the gallery show will be on exhibit through the end of September, including during Oaklands’ Oktoberfest celebration Saturday, Sept. 24.

“The Garden Party: Celebration of the Domestic Arts” is sponsored by the College of Behavioral and Health Sciences, the Department of Human Sciences and Oaklands.

For more information, contact Belcher at 615-898-2302 or deborah.belcher@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

This floral arrangement created by Deborah Belcher, chair of the MTSU Department of Human Sciences, will be on display at “The Garden Party: Celebration of the Domestic Arts” Sept. 29 at Oaklands Mansion.

This floral arrangement created by Deborah Belcher, chair of the MTSU Department of Human Sciences, will be on display at “The Garden Party: Celebration of the Domestic Arts” Sept. 29 at Oaklands Mansion.

Baldwin Gallery features exhibit of ‘Afghan Girl’ photographer’s work

Internationally acclaimed photographer and “visual storyteller” Steve McCurry’s work is the newest exhibit at MTSU’s renowned Baldwin Photographic Gallery, open now through Oct. 20.

Steve McCurry

Steve McCurry

Baldwin Gallery logo webThe collection of photographs focuses chiefly on the people McCurry has met while chronicling his three-plus decades of world travel. The Pennsylvania native worked for a local newspaper for two years after his 1974 graduation from Penn State University, then left to travel and freelance in India.

He wound up crossing into Afghanistan with some refugees just before the Russian invasion in 1979, disguising himself and traveling for weeks with the Mujahedeen before emerging with the first images of that conflict.

McCurry is best known for his photo “Afghan Girl,” a stark 1984 portrait of a teenage refugee that made the cover of National Geographic in 1985 and led to a nearly 18-year, and ultimately successful, search for her identity. The magazine called “Afghan Girl” “the most recognized photograph” in its history.

“Afghan Girl,” Steve McCurry’s best-known photo, depicts an teenaged Afghan refugee from the Russian invasion living at the Nasir Bagh refugee camp in Pakistan in 1984. The young woman, who survived her experience and was able to return home, was identified almost 18 years later as Sharbat Gula. This photo and more of McCurry’s work are in a new exhibit at MTSU’s Baldwin Gallery through Oct. 20. (photo submitted)

“Afghan Girl,” Steve McCurry’s best-known photo, depicts an teenaged Afghan refugee from the Russian invasion living at the Nasir Bagh refugee camp in Pakistan in 1984. The young woman, who survived her experience and was able to return home, was identified almost 18 years later as Sharbat Gula. This photo and more of McCurry’s work are in a new exhibit at MTSU’s Baldwin Gallery through Oct. 20. (photo submitted)

MTSU’s Baldwin Photographic Gallery is located in Room 269 on the second floor of the Bragg Media and Entertainment Building. A searchable, printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Off-campus guests visiting the Baldwin Gallery should obtain a special one-day permit from MTSU’s Office of Parking and Transportation at www.mtsu.edu/parking/visit.php.

McCurry, who’s also covered conflicts in Beirut, Cambodia, the Philippines, the Persian Gulf, the former Yugoslavia, and Tibet, is the recipient of numerous awards, including the National Press Photographers Association’s Magazine Photographer of the Year, the Robert Capa Gold Medal and an unprecedented four first-prize honors from the World Press Photo contest. The Minister of French Culture also appointed McCurry a Knight of the Order of Arts and Letters, and the Royal Photographic Society in London recently presented McCurry with its Centenary Medal for Lifetime Achievement.

McCurry’s books include “The Imperial Way,” “Monsoon,” “Portraits,” “South Southeast,” “Sanctuary,” “The Path to Buddha: A Tibetan Pilgrimage,” “Steve McCurry,” “Looking East,” “In the Shadow of Mountains,” “The Unguarded Moment,” “The Iconic Photographs” and “Untold: The Stories Behind the Photographs.”

He also founded ImagineAsia, a nonprofit organization, in 2004 that works with local leaders and regional nongovernmental organizations to provide educational resources and opportunities for children and young adults in Afghanistan. You can learn more about his work at his website, http://stevemccurry.com.

MTSU’s Baldwin Photographic Gallery, part of the university’s College of Media and Entertainment, is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and closed on weekends and state and university holidays.

Special Baldwin Gallery tours at MTSU can be arranged by contacting gallery curator Tom Jimison, a professor in MTSU’s Department of Electronic Media Communication, at 615-898-2085 or tom.jimison@mtsu.edu.

For more information about MTSU’s Baldwin Photographic Gallery, visit http://baldwinphotogallery.com or www.facebook.com/BaldwinPhotoGallery.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

This Afghan street photographer displaying his art and his camera is the subject of visual storyteller’s Steve McCurry’s lens and part of a new exhibit at MTSU’s Baldwin Gallery through Oct. 20. (photo submitted)

This Afghan street photographer displaying his art and his camera is the subject of visual storyteller’s Steve McCurry’s lens and part of a new exhibit at MTSU’s Baldwin Gallery through Oct. 20. (photo submitted)

Camels search for untainted shrubs and water in the burning Ahmadi Oil Fields of southern Kuwait in this 1991 Gulf War photo by Steve McCurry. McCurry’s work is in a new exhibit at MTSU’s Baldwin Gallery through Oct. 20. (photo submitted)

Camels search for untainted shrubs and water in the burning Ahmadi Oil Fields of southern Kuwait in this 1991 Gulf War photo by Steve McCurry. McCurry’s work is in a new exhibit at MTSU’s Baldwin Gallery through Oct. 20. (photo submitted)

Photographer Steve McCurry captured a moment in these Shaolin monks’ day during a visit to Zhengzhou, China, in 2004. McCurry’s work is in a new exhibit at MTSU’s Baldwin Gallery through Oct. 20. (photo submitted)

Photographer Steve McCurry captured a moment in these Shaolin monks’ day during a visit to Zhengzhou, China, in 2004. McCurry’s work is in a new exhibit at MTSU’s Baldwin Gallery through Oct. 20. (photo submitted)

Tribu Rabari poses calmly for a 2010 portrait in Rajasthan, India, by photographer Steve McCurry. McCurry’s work is in a new exhibit at MTSU’s Baldwin Gallery through Oct. 20. (photo submitted)

Tribu Rabari poses calmly for a 2010 portrait in Rajasthan, India, by photographer Steve McCurry. McCurry’s work is in a new exhibit at MTSU’s Baldwin Gallery through Oct. 20. (photo submitted)

MTSU celebrates teacher-philosopher at Sept. 21 ‘Confucius Day’ event

MTSU will pay tribute to one of the most quoted philosophers of all time and one of the greatest influences in the history of eastern Asia at a special event Wednesday, Sept. 21.

The Center for Chinese Music and Culture will sponsor a Confucius Day Celebration at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 21 in Hinton Hall inside the Wright Music Building.

Center for Chinese Music logo webThe event is free and open to the public, and a printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Dr. Mei Han, director of the center, said the program will feature a variety of traditional and contemporary Chinese instrumental music, including numbers from the period in which Confucius lived and fostered his philosophy.

Among the instruments to be played is the qin — pronounced “shin” —which is a thin, flat-bodied instrument with seven strings.

“This is a scholar instrument, and many historical records suggest that Confucius himself played the instrument,” said Han.

Taffy Xu

Taffy Xu

Dr. Mei Han

Dr. Mei Han

The Nashville Chinese Cultural Club and Jen-Jen Lin and Roxanne Crew from the Chinese Arts Alliance of Nashville also will perform dance numbers.

MTSU alumna Taffy Xu will complement the evening of music, dance and poetry by reading Confucius’ own sayings in both English and Chinese.

After graduating in 2011, Xu studied in Hangzhou, China, for one year through MTSU’s Confucius Institute Hanban scholarship. She earned her master’s degree in 2015 and is now an associate instructor at English Language School in Nashville.

Confucius was born in 551 BCE, Before the Common Era, in what is now Shandong province in China. He is believed to be the country’s first teacher to advocate making education available to all citizens and to encourage teaching as a vocation.

After a brief political career, which he was forced to end because of his moral values, he went into exile for 12 years. His reputation and his number of students and followers grew, however, and have continued to do so after his death in 479 BCE at the age of 72.

Confucius Day is the 27th day of the eighth lunar month on the Chinese calendar. It is celebrated on different days in the month of September in several Asian nations.

For more information, contact the MTSU Center for Chinese Music and Culture at 615-898-5718 or ccmc@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

This bronze statue of Confucius welcomes visitors to the central building of the Shanghai Confucius Temple in central Shanghai, China. The temple honoring the teacher-philsopher was built in the 14th century. MTSU's Center for Chinese Music and Culture is sponsoring a "Confucius Day Celebration" Wednesday, Sept. 21, in the Wright Music Building.

This bronze statue of Confucius welcomes visitors to the central building of the Shanghai Confucius Temple in central Shanghai, China. The temple honoring the teacher-philsopher was built in the 14th century. MTSU’s Center for Chinese Music and Culture is sponsoring a “Confucius Day Celebration” Wednesday, Sept. 21, in the Wright Music Building.

MTSU expands fall 2016 True Blue Admissions Tour to 11 cities

Middle Tennessee State University’s top administrators and deans will meet with prospective students in 11 cities this fall — seven in Tennessee and four in bordering states — as part of MTSU’s expanded True Blue Tour.

Planned annually by the university’s Admissions Office, this year’s True Blue Tour includes the traditional seven Tennessee recruitment stops in Chattanooga on Tuesday, Oct. 4; Johnson City on Tuesday, Oct. 18; Knoxville on Wednesday, Oct. 19; Williamson County/Franklin on Wednesday, Oct. 26; Nashville on Tuesday, Nov. 1; Memphis on Wednesday, Nov. 9; and Jackson on Thursday, Nov. 10.

In this September 2015 file photo, Chrisine Trotman, left, and her son, Ezra, both of Marietta, Ga., listen as MTSU Academic Common Market coordinator Peter Cunningham explains the new Regional Scholars Program at the Cobb Galleria Centre. Ezra Trotman is an MTSU freshman in the College of Media and Entertainment this fall. The scholars program reduces tuition for select Georgia, Alabama and Kentucky students. MTSU will visit the Atlanta area Oct. 5. The True Blue Tour event will be held at the Crown Plaza Atlanta Perimeter at Ravina, 4355 Ashford Dunwoody Road. (MTSU file photo by Randy Weiler)

Chrisine Trotman, left, and her son, Ezra, both of Marietta, Ga., listen as MTSU Academic Common Market coordinator Peter Cunningham explains the new Regional Scholars Program at the Cobb Galleria Centre during the September 2015 True Blue Tour. Ezra Trotman is an MTSU freshman in the College of Media and Entertainment this fall. The scholars program reduces tuition for select Georgia, Alabama and Kentucky students. MTSU will visit the Atlanta area again Oct. 5 at the Crown Plaza Atlanta Perimeter at Ravina, 4355 Ashford Dunwoody Road. (MTSU file photos by Randy Weiler)

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

MTSU will add Louisville, Kentucky, on Wednesday, Nov. 16, for the first time after expanding out of state to Atlanta, Huntsville, Alabama, and Bowling Green, Kentucky, last year.

This fall, MTSU travels to Atlanta on Wednesday, Oct. 5; Huntsville on Tuesday, Oct. 11; and Bowling Green on Tuesday, Nov. 15.

Each True Blue Tour student reception starts at 6 p.m. local time, except for the Nashville stop, which begins at 6:30 p.m. The events are free, but students should register in advance at www.mtsu.edu/schedule-a-visit/special-events.php.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee and interim Provost Mark Byrnes will join other administrators and deans from the university’s eight academic colleges, advisers and counselors from the admissions and financial aid offices on the tour.

They will be on hand to answer questions from prospective students, transfer students and their parents at the events.

“Our entire team always looks forward to these visits with outstanding prospective students and their families,” McPhee said. “It’s a great opportunity to share the exceptional educational experience MTSU offers. We welcome our alumni and friends from across the state and region to join us and tell others about MTSU.”

During the four out-of-state stops, university leaders will emphasize MTSU’s Academic Common Market program. This tuition savings program allows prospective students who live in participating states to qualify for in-state tuition rates for unique academic majors not offered in their home state. Learn more at www.mtsu.edu/acm.

Dr. Debra Sells

Dr. Debra Sells

Dr. Deb Sells, vice president of student affairs and vice provost for enrollment and academic services, calls the tour “our signature recruiting event for MTSU,” one that’s “just as important for freshmen and sophomores to begin gathering information as it is for juniors, seniors and transfer students to meet with us as they finalize their college choice.”

“We experienced double-digit increases in our new students from out-of-state on the heels of last year’s expansion to Huntsville, Atlanta and Bowling Green — so we are especially excited to be adding Louisville to this year’s tour,” she said. “It’s a treat for us to be able to tell the MTSU story, including news about some of our most exciting academic programs on the campus.”

Fall MTSU True Blue Tour reception sites are:

  • Oct. 4: Chattanooga Convention Center, 1 Carter Plaza, Chattanooga.
  • Oct. 5: Crown Plaza Atlanta Perimeter at Ravina, 4355 Ashford Dunwoody Road, Atlanta.
  • Oct. 11: U.S. Space and Rocket Center, 1 Tranquility Base, Huntsville, Alabama.
  • Oct. 18: The Millennium Centre, 2001 Millennium Place, Johnson City.
  • Oct. 19: The Foundry on the Fair Site, 747 World’s Fair Park Drive, Knoxville.
  • Oct. 26: Franklin Marriott Cool Springs, 700 Cool Springs Blvd., Franklin.
  • Nov. 1: Renaissance Nashville Hotel, 611 Commerce St., Nashville.
  • Nov. 9: Esplanade Memphis, 901 Cordova Station Ave., Cordova.
  • Nov. 10: Jackson Country Club, 31 Jackson Country Club Drive, Jackson.
  • Nov. 15: Holiday Inn University Plaza, 1021 Wilkinson Trace, Bowling Green, Kentucky.
  • Nov. 16: Marriott Louisville East, 1903 Embassy Square Road, Louisville, Kentucky.

Sells wants prospective students and their families to be aware of two key dates:

  • Saturday, Oct. 1 — the new filing date for FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) through https://fafsa.ed.gov. Previously, it had been Jan. 1.
  • Thursday, Dec. 1 — the MTSU freshman scholarship deadline. Freshmen students, members of the Class of 2021, who meet all scholarship criteria and complete their application for admissions will receive guaranteed awards. Transfer students who meet all transfer scholarship criteria and who complete applications for fall admission no later than Feb. 15, also will receive guaranteed awards.

Fall Preview Days are scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 24, and Saturday, Nov. 5, both starting at 8 a.m. in the Student Union. High school and community college students and counselors, as well as parents, can register to attend any free MTSU Admissions events by going to www.mtsu.edu/schedule-a-visit/special-events.php.

— Randy Weiler (randy.weiler@mtsu.edu)

Allison Dennis, left, of Fayetteville, Tenn., talks about her academic background and potential for the MTSU Honors College with Dean John Vile. They visited Nov. 4 during the MTSU True Blue Tour visit to Huntsville, Ala., at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center. Dennis, 17, is a senior at Lincoln County High School. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

Allison Dennis, left, of Fayetteville, Tenn., talks about her academic background and potential for the MTSU Honors College with Dean John Vile during the November 2015 MTSU True Blue Tour visit to Huntsville, Ala., at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center.

College of Basic and Applied Sciences adviser Kristen Janson, left, shares information about various departments in the college with prospective students and parents attending the October 2015 True Blue Tour event in Memphis. This year’s Memphis-area stop will be at Esplande Memphis in Cordova, Tenn.

College of Basic and Applied Sciences adviser Kristen Janson, left, shares information about various departments in the college with prospective students and parents attending the October 2015 True Blue Tour event in Memphis. This year’s Memphis-area stop will be at Esplande Memphis in Cordova, Tenn.

MTSU hosts 9/11 observance to ‘never forget’ [+VIDEO]

As she recounted details of the hundreds of first responders who lost their lives saving others as the Twin Towers collapsed in New York 15 years ago, MTSU senior ROTC cadet Sara Crum had to pause as emotion increasingly tightened its grip on her every word.

“I’m sorry y’all,” she told the crowd before continuing her welcoming remarks to those gathered early Sunday morning for Middle Tennessee State University’s 9/11 Observance Ceremony held at the Veterans Memorial outside of the Tom H. Jackson Building.

MTSU’s Department of Military Science held the event to commemorate the 15th anniversary of the terrorist attacks that occurred Sept. 11, 2001, killing nearly 3,000 people at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and in Pennsylvania.

https://youtu.be/7FU5wzEtYcg

Crum was among several U.S. Army ROTC cadets who shared their reflections about the impact of that tragic day on their young lives. A fifth-grader at the time of the attacks, Crum recalls her teachers bringing a television into their classroom as the attacks were unfolding.

“We actually watched the towers fall,” she said. “… I didn’t know then that I was going to join the U.S. military, but I stand here today, 15 years later, proud to have joined, proud to serve for the best fighting force in America and proud to serve for you all.”

MTSU ROTC cadet Joe Bell plays “Taps” at the conclusion of the university’s 9/11 Observance Ceremony Sunday morning outside the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Kimi Conro)

MTSU ROTC cadet Joe Bell plays “Taps” at the conclusion of the university’s 9/11 Observance Ceremony Sunday morning outside the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Kimi Conro)

Retired U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives at the university, noted that 65 MTSU alumni have given their lives defending the nation, seven of those since 9/11.

“Today is a day of remembrance, of reflection and of response,” said Huber, who spent nearly 40 years in the military, retiring as a three-star general.

At the time of the Sept. 11 attacks, Huber was a senior one-star general serving as the appointed commander of U.S. forces in Kosovo. Upon learning of the first plane striking one of the Twin Towers that morning, Huber said he at first thought some sort of malfunction must be to blame. But after an aide informed him of the second plane minutes later, he immediately knew “we’re at war.”

Ten years later, he was a part of that war, serving in Afghanistan overseeing detention operations for two years as America’s military continued the fight against al-Qaida. He joined MTSU in January 2015 to bolster the university’s strong commitment to student-veterans and their families and “serve these incredible men and women.”

“Never forget,” Huber told the crowd. “Remember where you were and how it impacted you, reflect on how precious life is and that life is not a spectator sport. And you must respond and you must focus on being worthy as an individual and as an organization of the democracy that is provided at such a cost.”

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee said the terrorists “failed” at their goals because the attacks didn’t demoralize America and didn’t deter the nation’s fighting spirit, but instead brought Americans closer together.

“It is indeed also fitting and proper that we held this ceremony here, on our sacred ground and on the 105th anniversary of the founding of this outstanding university, to remember the 9/11 victims,” he said.

“So let us today, on this very important spot, at this proud university, rededicate ourselves to the task of teaching this history to our future generations, so that they can reflect upon not just the cowardly acts and deeds of these terrorists, but the courage and commitment of those in our nation who would not allow those atrocities to go unanswered.”

The ceremony opened with a prayer and moment of silence led by cadet and graduate student Shanika Willis, president of the Blue Raider American Veterans Organization or BRAVO, and ended with “Taps” performed by cadet Joe Bell.

More than 30 ROTC cadets attended the ceremony, along with members from the Murfreesboro fire and police departments, MTSU Police Department and Tennessee Army National Guard.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee gives remarks at the university’s 9/11 Observance Ceremony Sunday morning outside the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Kimi Conro)

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee gives remarks at the university’s 9/11 Observance Ceremony Sunday morning outside the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Kimi Conro)

MTSU ROTC cadet and graduate student Shanika Willis leads a prayer at the university’s 9/11 Observance Ceremony Sunday morning outside the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Kimi Conro)

MTSU ROTC cadet and graduate student Shanika Willis leads a prayer at the university’s 9/11 Observance Ceremony Sunday morning outside the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Kimi Conro)

MTSU ROTC senior cadet Sara Crum welcomes attendees at the university’s 9/11 Observance Ceremony Sunday morning outside the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Kimi Conro)

MTSU ROTC senior cadet Sara Crum welcomes attendees at the university’s 9/11 Observance Ceremony Sunday morning outside the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Kimi Conro)

Retired Lt. Gen. Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives at MTSU, gives remarks at the university’s 9/11 Observance Ceremony Sunday morning outside the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Kimi Conro)

Retired Lt. Gen. Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives at MTSU, gives remarks at the university’s 9/11 Observance Ceremony Sunday morning outside the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photo by Kimi Conro)

200-plus community voices unite Sept. 18 for Beethoven’s ‘Ode to Joy’

More than 200 of Middle Tennessee’s finest musicians are bringing a joyful noise to the community Sunday, Sept. 18, with a special MTSU Presidential Concert featuring the final movement of Ludwig von Beethoven’s immortal Ninth Symphony — the “Ode to Joy.”

Click on the poster to see a larger version.

Click on the poster to see a larger version.

Set for 7:30 p.m. Sept. 18 at Murfreesboro’s First United Methodist Church, 265 W. Thompson Lane, more than 200 community voices from MTSU’s combined choirs, the Middle Tennessee Choral Society, and the Stewart’s Creek and Siegel High School choirs will perform with an orchestra. They’ll be joined by four guest soloists:

  • soprano Dina Cancryn, mezzo-soprano Christine Isley-Farmer and tenor H. Stephen Smith, all vocal music professors at MTSU.
  • bass John Kramar, a voice professor at East Carolina University School of Music in Greenville, North Carolina.

Tickets for this MTSU Arts production, which is sponsored by the Office of the President, MTSU and the Middle Tennessee Choral Society, are $15 general admission, $12.50 for seniors and $10 for children 12 and under. You can purchase tickets online at https://mtchoralsociety.org.

Dina Cancryn

Dina Cancryn

Dr. Christine Isley-Farmer

Dr. Christine Isley-Farmer

Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, finished in 1824, is the composer’s final completed symphony and is considered one of the greatest works in musical history as well as one of the most played.

The words, which originated in a poem by German poet, playwright Friedrich Schiller, are sung by a chorus and four soloists in the final movement. The work is the first example of a major composer using voices in a symphony.

Pianist Arunesh Nadgir, coordinator of keyboard studies for MTSU’s School of Music, also will present Edvard Grieg’s “Piano Concerto in A minor” during the Sept. 18 concert.

“We are very proud to present the ‘Ode to Joy’ as our concert season opener with Dr. Nadgir’s concerto,” said Dr. Raphael Bundage, a professor of vocal performance in MTSU’s School of Music and Choral Society music director/conductor.

The Sept. 18 concert launches another busy 2016-17 season for the Middle Tennessee Choral Society.

H. Stephen Smith

H. Stephen Smith

John Kramar

John Kramar

Dr. Arunesh Nadgir

Dr. Arunesh Nadgir

The annual performance of Handel’s “Messiah,” set Monday, Nov. 28, marks the 32nd anniversary of the group’s presentation of the beloved holiday oratorio.

“Messiah” will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 28 at First United Methodist Church. Tickets for that concert, which also will feature a professional orchestra and MTSU student and faculty soloists, also are $15, $12.50 and $10 per person.

On Feb. 26, the MTSU Concert Chorale and Middle Tennessee Choral Society will present “Choruses and Arias: From Broadway to Opera,” featuring music from George Gershwin, Cole Porter and Giacomo Puccini.

For information on more MTSU School of Music concerts, call 615-898-2493 or visit the MTSU School of Music “Concert Calendar” link.

For details on joining the Middle Tennessee Choral Society, contact Bundage at raphael.bundage@mtsu.edu or 615-898-2849.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU presents ‘My Father’s War’ Sept. 13 at Tucker Theatre

A World War II veteran’s memoir will be brought to life in storytelling and song during the Sept. 13 performance of “My Father’s War: A Story of War, Survival and Grace” at MTSU.

The campus community and public are invited to this special free performance, which is set for 9:40 to 11:05 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13, in Tucker Theatre. It is sponsored by a Distinguished Lecture Grant and the Department of Theatre and Dance at MTSU.myfatherswar-graphic-web

A special adaption of the war memoir, “Ponder Anew,” written by Lt. Herschel Ponder, the performance features Ponder’s middle daughter, Carol Ponder, and her husband, Robert Kiefer.

Both theater and music professionals for over 40 years, the couple have toured the show for nine years, including three weeks at the Piccolo Spoleto Festival in Charleston, South Carolina. Kiefer’s other works have been seen in K-12 schools, colleges and universities, and in arts centers around the country.

In “My Father’s War,” the two actors have adapted the memoir into a two-person performance created in the great tradition of storytelling and song from Ponder’s family home in the Appalachian Mountains of western North Carolina.

On July 4, 1989, 44 years after the end of World War II, Lt. Herschel Ponder sat down at his kitchen table to write his war memoir. The story describes his fears, joys and struggle to remain human during and after the war, but also tells the story of a soldier going to war and coming home again.

A searchable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap. Off-campus visitors attending the event should obtain a special one-day permit from MTSU’s Office of Parking and Transportation at www.mtsu.edu/parking/visit.php.

For a preview of the performance, watch the video below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MEXHL5q-avw

Inaugural Gender Studies lecture includes ‘Lift Like a Girl’ film

A 40-year-old Tennessee mother’s personal discovery of fitness and body image will be the subject of MTSU’s first fall 2016 Women’s and Gender Studies Research Series lecture Thursday, Sept. 15.

Jenny Lutkins, a 40-year-old weightlifting coach from Franklin, Tenn., hoists a 10-kilogram weight over her head in “Lift Like a Girl,” a documentary by MTSU assistant professor Allie Sultan. The film will be shown Sept. 15 as part of MTSU’s Women’s and Gender Studies Research Lecture Series. (photo submitted)

Jenny Lutkins, a 40-year-old weightlifting coach from Franklin, Tenn., hoists a 10-kilogram weight over her head in “Lift Like a Girl,” a documentary by MTSU assistant professor Allie Sultan. The film will be shown Sept. 15 as part of MTSU’s Women’s and Gender Studies Research Lecture Series. (photo submitted)

“Lift Like a Girl,” a short documentary produced and directed by MTSU assistant professor Allie Sultan, will be shown at 3 p.m. Sept. 15 in Room 100 of the James Union Building.

A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Sultan, who teaches in the Department of Electronic Media Communication, will use the screening as a catalyst for discussion under the theme of “Women Creating Women: Issues of Representation in the Media.”

“We made this film to challenge images and ideas of beauty in our media culture,” said Sultan. “We look forward to sharing the film and discussing women’s representation in the media with students, faculty and staff at MTSU.”

The documentary tells the story of MTSU alumna Jenny Lutkins, a 40-year-old Franklin, Tennessee, resident who became frustrated with numerous unsuccessful diet and exercise regimens following the birth of her son.

When Lutkins turned to weightlifting, it transformed her concepts of feminine health and beauty. Now, as a coach, she imparts what she has learned to young female weightlifters.

MTSU assistant professor Allie Sultan, right, of the Department of Electronic Media Communication, pauses for a photo with the subject of her award-winning documentary short "Lift Like a Girl," Jenny Lutkins, at the 2016 Nashville Film Festival. (Photo courtesy of the College of Media and Entertainment)

MTSU assistant professor Allie Sultan, right, of the Department of Electronic Media Communication pauses for a photo with the subject of her award-winning documentary short “Lift Like a Girl,” Jenny Lutkins, at the 2016 Nashville Film Festival. (Photo courtesy of the College of Media and Entertainment)

The film captured the Grand Jury Prize for Best Tennessee Documentary Short at the 2016 Nashville Film Festival, third place in the Best Documentary Short category and second place in the Best Tennessee Documentary category at the 2016 Knoxville Film Festival, and the Audience Award in the 2015 Fusion International Documentary Challenge.

Sultan has more than 15 years of experience as a picture and sound editor for films, documentaries, reality television and visual effects. She earned her bachelor’s degree in recording industry from MTSU and her master’s degree in cinema from San Francisco State University.

Each academic year, the Women’s and Gender Studies Research Lecture Series presents a wide range of feminist perspectives from MTSU faculty and students at informal gatherings.

This event is free and open to the public. Off-campus visitors attending the event should obtain a special one-day permit from MTSU’s Office of Parking and Transportation at www.mtsu.edu/parking/visit.php.

For more information, contact the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at 615-898-5910 or womenstu@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU plans 9/11 Observance with special ceremony Sunday

The public is invited to join the MTSU community for the university’s second 9/11 Observance at 7:30 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 11, at the Veterans Memorial site outside the Tom H. Jackson Building.

In this September 2015 file photo, MTSU ROTC cadets salute during the playing of taps at the university’s 9/11 Observance on the 14th anniversary of the deadly terrorist attacks on U.S. soil. The event was held in the MTSU Veterans Memorial. (MTSU file photo by J. Intintoli)

In this September 2015 file photo, MTSU ROTC cadets salute during the playing of  “Taps” at the university’s 9/11 Observance on the 14th anniversary of the deadly terrorist attacks on U.S. soil. That event was held at the MTSU Veterans Memorial. (MTSU file photo by J. Intintoli)

Led by cadets in the program, MTSU’s Department of Military Science will conduct the event to observe the 15th anniversary of a series of four coordinated suicide attacks by the Islamic extremist group al-Qaida on U.S. landmarks, which occurred Sept. 11, 2001.

To find parking for the event, visit http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Guest speakers will be Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives at the university, and Dr. Sidney A. McPhee, MTSU president.

Huber, a Franklin, Tennessee, resident who joined MTSU in January 2015, spent nearly 40 years in the military, retiring as a U.S. Army lieutenant general. McPhee is MTSU’s 10th president, taking the post in 2001.

The event program includes:

  • A welcome provided by senior chemistry major Sara Crum, an ROTC cadet.
  • A prayer and moment of silence led by graduate student and chemistry/business administration student Shanika Willis, president of the Blue Raider American Veterans Organization.
  • Remarks by McPhee and Huber.
  • “Taps,” performed by cadet Joe Bell.
  • Closing remarks and dismissal.
Keith M. Huber

Keith M. Huber

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

On Sept. 11, 2001, 19 terrorists hijacked four airliners, flying two into the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York City and a third into the Pentagon in Washington, D.C.

Passengers on the fourth plane, United Flight 93, fought with the hijackers and forced the aircraft down into a field in Pennsylvania, diverting it from its still-unknown intended terrorism target.

All told, more than 3,000 people died during the attacks on New York and Washington, including more than 400 firefighters and police officers, as well as those on the four planes.

To learn more about the MTSU Veterans Memorial, visit www.mtsu.edu/military/memorial. Military science is one of 11 College of Basic and Applied Sciences departments. To learn more, visit www.mtsu.edu/arotc1.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Election issues for women, children in spotlight at Sept. 8 AAUW forum

In a turbulent election year with local, state and national offices at stake, MTSU will host a nonpartisan forum Thursday, Sept. 8, to identify practical issues important to women and families.

AAUW Mboro logo web“What’s At Stake for Women and Children in This Election,” sponsored by the American Association of University Women’s Murfreesboro branch, is scheduled for 5:30 p.m. Sept. 8 in Cantrell Hall at MTSU’s Tom Jackson Building.

The event is free and open to the public.

Attendees may park in the Midgett Building parking lot, and parking passes will be available at the event registration table. A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Dr. Phyllis Qualls-Brooks

Dr. Phyllis Qualls-Brooks

Dr. Phyllis Qualls-Brooks, former director of the Tennessee Economic Council for Women, will moderate the panel. Panelists include Sara Beth Myers of Advocates for Women’s and Kids’ Equality of Tennessee, Zulfat Suara of Business and Professional Women of Tennessee, Emily Passini of Women’s Political Collaborative of Tennessee and Peggy Swann of AAUW Tennessee.

“These nonpartisan organizations spend a good deal of time on the hill in Nashville and work with Tennessee’s congressional delegation on practical issues that improve the lives of women and families in our state,” said AAUW Murfreesboro President Dia Cirillo.

Tennessee ranks dead last among all 50 states in voter turnout, according to the most recent report by the Pew Charitable Trusts. The Institute on Women’s Policy Research ranks Tennessee 42nd in the country in female voter turnout.

Dia Cirillo

Dia Cirillo

“It’s not uncommon to hear friends or colleagues talk about not voting,” said Cirillo. “Despite that fatigue, we make a difference when we hit the polls and bring our friends along.”

MTSU’s Women and Gender Studies Program, the June S. Anderson Center for Women and Nontraditional Students, the American Democracy Project, the President’s Commission on the Status of Women and the AAUW student organization are all university co-sponsors of the event.vote button web

In addition to organizations represented on the panel, other sponsors include the League of Women Voters, the Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Center, Women in Higher Education in Tennessee and AdvanceRutherford, a nonpartisan consortium of organizations and programs serving women and girls in Rutherford County.

AAUW works for equity for women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy, and research. AAUW membership is open to college students and anyone with a college degree, including a two-year degree. For more information, contact Cirillo at 773-677-4238 or aauwboropresident@gmail.com.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)