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Gently used household goods needed for Aug. 23 ‘Great Giveaway’

When international students come to MTSU for the fall 2014 semester, they’ll be able to get what they need to make their homes more comfortable.

Raiders for Christ is accepting donations of gently used household items for its annual “Great Giveaway” from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Aug. 23, at the group’s headquarters, 1105 E. Bell Road in Murfreesboro.

Raiders for Christ logo web“Anything that would help an international student set up an apartment or a dorm room is welcome,” said Sarah Johnson, director of women’s outreach.

The most sought-after items include china, silverware, mattresses, sheets, comforters, sofas, chairs, toaster ovens, shower curtain liners and umbrellas.

“Bicycles go over really well, because most of the time they don’t have any way to get around,” Johnson said.

About 20 volunteers, including five truck drivers, will be on hand to help load and transport items to students’ residences. Each international student may take one large item and as many small items as he or she wants.

Johnson said Raiders for Christ, an MTSU student organization that describes itself as “a community of disciples on a journey with Jesus,” has conducted the “Great Giveaway” for some 15 years.

“We’ll have about 100 students come in during the day,” she said.

To donate items or for more information, contact Raiders for Christ at 615-896-1529 or send an email to Johnson at sarahfjohnson@yahoo.com.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU hosting Aug. 16 reading conference for area educators

MTSU is hosting an annual conference Saturday, Aug. 16, to help area educators improve the reading skills of their students.

Click flier to view readable version.

Click flier to view readable version.

Sponsored by the Tennessee Center for the Study and Treatment of Dyslexia, the second annual Reading Conference will run from 8:15 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. at the MTSU Business and Aerospace Building inside the State Farm Lecture Hall (S102). Registration and breakfast runs 7:30 to 8:15 a.m.

The keynote address entitled “Beyond What Works: When Research Meets Reality” will be given by Dr. Deborah Simmons, an MTSU alumna and nationally known reading expert and researcher. She is currently a professor in the College of Education and Human Development at Texas A&M University where she conducts research in reading acquisition and development for preschool through secondary grades.

Simmons received her undergraduate and master’s degrees from MTSU and her doctorate from Purdue University. She was an educator in Rutherford County for eight years and also served on the faculties of Bowling Green University, Vanderbilt University and the University of Oregon.

The daylong conference also includes breakout sessions for elementary school, middle school and high school educators on the topics of content area reading, writing and vocabulary.

Register online and find speaker and session details at http://www.mtsu.edu/dyslexia. The $50 registration fee includes continental breakfast and lunch.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

Tennessee Journalism Hall of Fame inducts ‘humbled’ 2014 class (+VIDEOS)

Representing excellence in newspaper, television and radio news, six veteran journalists were inducted into the second class of the Tennessee Journalism Hall of Fame before a capacity crowd Tuesday afternoon at Murfreesboro’s Embassy Suites Hotel and Conference Center.

Journalists celebrate the induction of six new honorees for lifetime achievement during ceremonies Tuesday in Murfreesboro for the Tennessee Journalism Hall of Fame, located at MTSU. From left to right are Phil Cox, general manager of WDEF-TV in Chattanooga and chairman of the Tennessee Association of Broadcasters, who represented Chattanooga WDEF radio journalist Luther Masingill; Bob Johnson of WTVC-TV in Chattanooga; Otis Stanford, former Memphis Commercial Appeal managing editor; WSMV anchor Demetria Kalodimos, who served as the event’s emcee; Sam Venable, columnist for the Knoxville News Sentinel; Pulitzer Prize winner Alex Jones, whose family owns The Greeneville Sun; Joe Birch of WMC-TV in Memphis; and Hooper Penuel of Murfreesboro, the hall’s co-founder. (MTSU photos)

The inductions were held during the 60th annual conference of the Tennessee Association of Broadcasters, which sponsored the ceremony along with the Associated Press. The Hall of Fame is an independent partner with MTSU’s College of Mass Communication, which houses the hall in its Center for Innovation in Media inside the Bragg Mass Communication Building on the MTSU campus.

The 2014 honorees were:

  • Joe Birch, longtime co-anchor of WMC-TV Action News 5 in Memphis. A veteran lead anchor for 35 years, Birch is an Emmy Award-winning journalist who has been recognized for his community work. He exposed sex dens being operated in abandoned schools and became a hero of and for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital as a prolific fundraising advocate.
  • Bob Johnson, retired co-anchor of WTVC-TV News in Chattanooga. A veteran journalist of 45 years, Johnson reported from the scene of stories as diverse as the 1988 Moscow summit between the U.S. and Russia and the space shuttle’s first flight after the 1986 Challenger explosion.
  • Alex S. Jones, a Pulitzer Prize winner for The New York Times. Jones is the director of the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and also holds the school’s Laurence M. Lombard Chair in the Press and Public Policy. His family owns the Greeneville Sun in Greeneville, Tennessee, which is part of the Jones Media Network.
  • Luther Masingill of WDEF Radio/TV, Chattanooga. Masingill is the world’s longest-serving radio announcer working at the same station. He is the only announcer to have reported on-air both the 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the 2011 terrorist attack on the Twin Towers in New York City.
  • Otis Sanford, longtime former reporter, editor and columnist for The Commercial Appeal in Memphis. Sanford now holds the Helen and Jabie Hardin Chair of Excellence in Economics/Managerial Journalism in the Department of Journalism at the University of Memphis. He is a nationally recognized speaker on journalism ethics, education and the First Amendment.
  • Sam Venable, columnist for the Knoxville News Sentinel. Venable has also written 12 books featuring his wit and unique look at life and contributed to many other books as well. He is the winner of more than three dozen national and regional writing awards.

With proud family, friends and supporters looking on, this year’s inductees noted the honor of being members of the same hall of fame that inducted legendary journalist and First Amendment advocate John Seigenthaler in its inaugural class last year. Seigenthaler died last month at age 86.

Birch thanked the mentors “who taught me our craft” and hoped that the hall would inspire the next generation of dedicated journalist “because we need bright young people in journalism, whatever it’s going to be.”

Click the image above to visit the Hall of Fame website.

Johnson, who retired from television news in 2007 after being diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, expressed the supreme satisfaction he felt of “holding a mirror to the community” in Chattanooga for more than three decades.

Jones, a fourth-generation journalist who won a Pulitzer for his in-depth coverage of a Kentucky family’s media empire, told the crowd that “journalism is an art, a craft, a calling, and a mission, and work … it’s all kinds of things.” To the journalists in attendance, he said, “I’m proud to be one of you.”

Masingill, now 92, was unable to attend the ceremony. Proudly accepting the honor on his behalf were Phil Cox, general manager of WDEF-TV and chairman of the Tennessee Association of Broadcasters, and Bernie Barker, vice president and general manager of WDEF Radio. “Luther is an incredible fixture in Chattanooga,” Barker said.

Sanford noted that journalism “is not only a noble profession, but sometimes it’s a calling from the Almighty. … It’s been a thrill ride for me in journalism.” After sharing some of his trademark humor, Venable said that he was “incredibly honored and humbled” to be inducted into the hall of fame.

WSMV-TV Channel 4 anchor Demetria Kalodimos served as master of ceremonies.

MTSU WordmarkIn welcoming remarks, MTSU Mass Communication Dean Ken Paulson noted that Seigenthaler, a “good friend” with whom he worked for years at the First Amendment Center, was thrilled to be inducted into the hall’s inaugural class last year because of what the hall represents for a noble profession.

“It meant the world to him,” Paulson said of Seigenthaler. “One of our biggest challenges in education is conveying to this new generation of journalists just how important this work is.”

The Hall of Fame’s bylaws note that its inductees represent “those who have made significant and substantial contributions to the journalism profession.” Honorees may be living or deceased native Tennesseans who spent much of their career in state or out of state, or non-natives who spent a substantial part of their career in Tennessee.

The hall’s inaugural honorees, inducted in April 2013, were Chris Clark, retired chief news anchor for WTVF-TV NewsChannel 5 in Nashville; Anne Holt, a 30-year veteran and three-time Emmy winner at Nashville’s WKRN-TV News 2; the late Dan Miller, longtime chief news anchor and multiple Emmy Award winner at Nashville’s WSMV-TV Channel 4; Seigenthaler, chairman emeritus of The Tennessean and founding editorial director of USA Today; Dean Stone, editor of The Daily Times in Maryville, Tennessee, and former president of the Tennessee Associated Press Managing Editors; and William Bryant “Bill” Williams Jr., publisher emeritus of the Paris (Tennessee) Post-Intelligencer.

Clark, Stone and Williams also attended Tuesday’s ceremony.

To be considered by the Hall of Fame’s board for induction, individuals must have distinguished themselves through news or business management, leadership in the industry, or in the ordinary practice of journalism. Those whose contributions have been recognized by their peers in other venues also may be considered. Inductees can include reporters, writers, editors, publishers, news directors and other managers, as well as those who have excelled in advertising or public relations and journalism, advertising and PR education.

For more information about the Tennessee Journalism Hall of Fame, visit its website at www.tnjournalismhof.org or contact Hooper Penuel, TJHOF secretary, at 615-347-1672.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

Ken Paulson, dean of MTSU’s College of Mass Communication, addresses the audience before Tuesday’s induction ceremonies for the Tennessee Journalism Hall of Fame during the Tennessee Association of Broadcasters conference in Murfreesboro. Looking on is Demetria Kalodimos, anchor for WSMV-TV in Nashville, who served as the event’s emcee.

Larry Burriss, a professor in MTSU’s College of Mass Communication and president of the Tennessee Journalism Hall of Fame, welcomes the crowd at Tuesday’s induction ceremony.

Watch a video of the entire ceremony below:

MTSU takes reins in hosting therapeutic horse conferences

Emily Hulak, left, Jessica Schultz and rider Emily Smith work on therapeutic horsemanship training as they may become equine-assisted activities and therapies trainers. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

Emily Hulak, left, Jessica Schultz and rider Emily Smith work on therapeutic horsemanship training as they may become equine-assisted activities and therapies trainers. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU’s Horse Science Center and Tennessee Miller Coliseum will be the site this week for respective national and regional conferences related to equine-assisted activities and therapies and therapeutic horsemanship.

The conferences will begin Thursday, Aug. 7, at Miller Coliseum (www.mtsu.edu/tmc/directions.php) and include the Aug. 7-8 Uniting Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies with Higher Education Conference and the Aug. 8-10 Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, or PATH, International Region 5 Conference.

Therapeutic horsemanship helps people with a wide range of emotional, cognitive and physical challenges, said Sarah Newton-Cromwell, an MTSU Horse Science graduate student who is scheduled to graduate Saturday, Aug. 9, with a master’s degree and will be a conference presenter.

Newton-Cromwell added that anyone can benefit from both therapeutic horsemanship through traditional riding lessons and equine therapy, where a licensed professional sets goals and tracks progress, and horsemanship skills may or may not be taught.

MTSU’s Horse Science program has been a pioneer in this, in particular working with the Alvin C. York VA Medical Center in Murfreesboro to provide equine-assisted activities and therapies to veterans.

When no other colleges or universities agreed to host the national conference with an emphasis in higher education, the regional conference leadership asked MTSU, which leaped at the opportunity.

“We saw the need for the higher education conference so we actually developed that idea and then approached AQHA (the American Quarter Horse Association) for a grant to host it,” said associate professor Holly Spooner, who also serves as Miller Chair of Equine Health at the Horse Science Center on West Thompson Lane.

About 60 people preregistered for the national conference, which Spooner believes will be a uniting of the equine-assisted activities folks with those in higher education to discuss career opportunities for students, research in the area and future endeavors, and offers “an opportunity for MTSU to show our facilities as well as the great work we are doing in the area,” she said.

Spooner and Newton-Cromwell said national conference attendees would come from Arizona, Colorado, Texas, New Hampshire and other states.

“It’s a chance to get everyone together and share what they are doing, talk about research and what we need to do in the area of research to move this field forward,” Spooner said.

The regional conference will bring 120-plus professionals here from Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee, Kentucky and Puerto Rico.

Part of the training MTSU students receive is in therapeutic horsemanship and equine-assisted activities and therapies as the university’s horse science program continues as a pioneer in the area.

Newton-Cromwell is a PATH International-certified advanced instructor and mentor with 17 years of equine-assisted activities and therapies experience. She will lead a Sunday, Aug. 10, session on the collaboration between the Horse Science Center and Veteran’s Recovery Center — a program that helps veterans who struggle with hope, self-esteem, trust and community integration because of serious and persistent mental illness.

Newton-Cromwell said she will miss her commencement.

“I prefer missing for an opportunity like this,” she said. “It’s like the best graduation because I’m out there doing it.”

Late registration will be available for local residents who might have an interest in this endeavor.

For more on the higher education and equine-assisted activities and therapies conference, visit http://capone.mtsu.edu/horsesci/EAATconference.html.

For more information on the PATH International and the Region 5 conference, visit www.pathintl.org.

To learn more about the MTSU Horse Science program, visit www.mtsu.edu/programs/horse-science or call 615-898-2832.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU announces 6-city 2014 True Blue admissions tour

Middle Tennessee State University’s top administrators and deans will meet with prospective students in six Tennessee cities in September and October as part of the university’s annual True Blue Tour.

The statewide tour, organized by the university’s Admissions Office, will include student receptions in Chattanooga on Wednesday, Sept. 17; Johnson City on Monday, Sept. 22; Knoxville on Tuesday, Sept. 23; Nashville on Tuesday, Sept. 30; Memphis on Wednesday, Oct. 22; and Jackson on Thursday, Oct. 23.

true blue tour fall 2013 graphic cropped

Click to register for a tour stop.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee and other administrators will join deans of the university’s eight academic colleges and counselors from the financial aid and admissions offices to answer questions from prospective students, transfer students and their parents.

“We look forward to these trips each year,” McPhee said. “They allow us to meet top-notch students across the state and tell them about all our university has to offer.”

MTSU’s admissions counselors will also meet with high school counselors at each tour stop and provide them with campus and program updates, said Deb Sells, vice president for student affairs and vice provost for enrollment and academic services.

Each True Blue Tour reception starts at 6 p.m. local time. The events are free, but students should register in advance at www.mtsu.edu/rsvp.

Fall True Blue Tour reception sites are:

In this 2013 file photo, Bearden High School senior Dakota Eddy, left, tells Middle Tennessee State University President Sidney A. McPhee that he has won an iPad during a prize drawing during the MTSU True Blue Tour visit to Knoxville in September 2013. (File photo by MTSU News and Media Relations)

In this September 2013 file photo, Bearden High School senior Dakota Eddy, left, tells MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee that he has won an iPad during a prize drawing during the MTSU True Blue Tour visit to Knoxville. (File photo by MTSU News and Media Relations)

  • Sept. 17: Chattanooga Convention Center, 1 Carter Plaza, Chattanooga;
  • Sept. 22: The Millennium Place, 2001 Millennium Place, Johnson City;
  • Sept. 23: The Foundry on the Fair Site, 747 World’s Fair Park Drive, Knoxville;
  • Sept. 30: Rocketown, 601 Fourth Ave. S., Nashville;
  • Oct. 22: Memphis Botanic Gardens, 750 Cherry Road, Memphis;
  • Oct. 23: The Jackson Country Club, 31 Jackson Country Club Drive, Jackson.

Students who apply for MTSU admission by Dec. 1 receive priority consideration for scholarships, Sells said. MTSU is also reaching out to about 15,000 Tennessee high school seniors with ACT scores of 19 and higher by mailing a brochure inviting them to attend a tour stop and visit the Murfreesboro campus, Sells said.

“We’re hoping to see many of them at our recruiting events across the state, as well as at our special preview days on campus,” she said.

Fall Preview Days have been scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 27, and Saturday, Nov. 1, both starting at 8 a.m. in the Student Union, Sells added. High school and community college students and counselors, as well as parents, can register to attend any MTSU Admissions events by going to www.mtsu.edu/rsvp.

MTSU organizes cultural exchange trip for local children

HANGZHOU, China – Rutherford County schoolchildren, parents and teachers traveled to six cities in China this summer as part of an ongoing cultural and educational exchange between the two countries organized by MTSU.

The July 7-18 trip was the third consecutive exchange between the Dongcheng Educational Group of Hangzhou Normal University and MTSU. Local students began the back-and-forth with a 2012 trip to China, then Dongcheng students visited MTSU last summer.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee and first lady Elizabeth McPhee (center) are joined by Lin Zhengfan, board chairman for the Dongcheng Education Group at China's Hangzhou Normal University (right of Elizabeth McPhee), during the welcoming ceremony at HNU for students, parents and educators who traveled to China in July as part of a cultural exchange sponsored by Dongcheng and organized by MTSU. The group is standing in front of a photo taken last year on the MTSU campus when students from China visited Murfreesboro. (MTSU photo by Marketing and Communications)

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee and first lady Elizabeth McPhee (center) are joined by Lin Zhengfan, board chairman for the Dongcheng Education Group at China’s Hangzhou Normal University (right of Elizabeth McPhee), during the welcoming ceremony at HNU for students, parents and educators who traveled to China in July as part of a cultural exchange sponsored by Dongcheng and organized by MTSU. The group is standing in front of a photo taken last year on the MTSU campus when students from China visited Murfreesboro. (MTSU photo by Marketing and Communications)

Students visited classrooms, participated in cultural and enrichment activities and were linked with the families of Dongcheng children for home visits.

“China was an experience of a lifetime,” said McKenzie Louis, 11, a sixth-grader at Oakland Middle School. “I learned a lot about the Chinese culture, food, family structure and schools.”

Retired Murfreesboro City Schools teacher Elizabeth McPhee, wife of MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, headed up the delegation. The first lady, along with teachers Kristy Mall and Sevon Davis-Louis, also taught a joint class for Chinese and American students, then Elizabeth McPhee held a seminar for Chinese teachers.

“It was valuable not only for Rutherford County students to learn from Chinese teachers, but also for Dongcheng faculty to see how American educators present ideas and concepts in the classroom,” said MTSU President McPhee.

The delegation also visited cultural and tourist sites in Hangzhou; Shanghai; Qiandao Lake; Jiashan and the nearby ancient town of Xitang; and Xi’an, the first capital of China and home to the Terra Cotta Warriors, a World Heritage area.

MTSU’s Confucius Institute, a joint effort between the Hangzhou and Murfreesboro universities, oversees the annual exchange. Families paid their travel expenses to and from China, but most housing and travel costs in country were covered by grants from Dongcheng and private donations.

Hanban, the international headquarters of Confucius Institute, and Shaanxi Normal University in Xi’an, sponsored the Xi’an trip.

“This experience has been very enlightening and I am looking forward to hosting my new friends when they visit (the United States),” McKenzie said.

— Andrew Oppmann (andrew.oppmann@mtsu.edu)

Tennessee Journalism Hall of Fame to induct 2014 class Aug. 12

Six outstanding journalists comprise the second class to be inducted into the Tennessee Journalism Hall of Fame located at Middle Tennessee State University. Induction ceremonies for the 2014 class will take place at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 12, during the 60th annual conference of the Tennessee Association of Broadcasters at Murfreesboro’s Embassy Suites Hotel and Conference Center. The TJHOF is an independent partner with MTSU’s College of Mass Communication, which houses the hall in its Center for Innovation in Media inside the Bragg Mass Communication Building on the MTSU campus. The 2014 honorees are:TNJHOF BANNER-web

  • Joe Birch, co-anchor, WMV-TV Action News 5, Memphis.
  • Bob Johnson, co-anchor of WTVC-TV News, Chattanooga.
  • Alex S. Jones, Pulitzer Prize winner, The New York Times.
  • Luther Masingill, WDEF Radio/TV, Chattanooga.
  • Otis Sanford, editor, columnist, The Commercial Appeal, Memphis.
  • Sam Venable, columnist, Knoxville News Sentinel.

The Hall of Fame’s bylaws note that its inductees represent “those who have made significant and substantial contributions to the journalism profession.” Honorees may be living or deceased native Tennesseans who spent much of their career in state or out of state, or non-natives who spent a substantial part of their career in Tennessee. WSMV-TV Channel 4 anchor Demetria Kalodimos will serve as master of ceremonies for the 2014 induction ceremony. Kalodimos, the longest continuous evening news anchor for the NBC affiliate, has won many national journalism awards, including the Edward R. Murrow award for investigative reporting. More details about each of the honorees follow.

• Joe Birch
Joe Birch

Joe Birch

A veteran lead anchor for 35 years with WMC-TV, Birch is as well-known in Memphis as CBS’s Walter Cronkite was to the nation. Devoted to his craft, his community and his family, Birch exposed sex dens being operated in abandoned schools, became a hero of and for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital as a prolific fundraising advocate, convinced actor Michael Douglas to openly talk about his personal life on camera, and, less than two weeks after an automobile accident that broke his neck, was back on the job to continue serving the community with compassion, experience and influence. The Emmy Award-winning journalist also has been recognized for his community work: The Metropolitan Inter-Faith Association created the Joe Birch Media Award in 2007 to recognize communicators who help publicize its services and to thank Birch, who’s delivered Meals on Wheels for the organization weekly since 1997.

• Bob Johnson
Bob Johnson

Bob Johnson

Johnson, a veteran journalist of 45 years, began his career spinning records at a small radio station in his Marietta, Georgia, hometown, but he found his niche in TV, moving up the ranks to become the anchor for WTVC-TV Channel 9’s evening newscasts as well as co-host of yearly telethons for various causes. Before he retired in 2007, Johnson reported from the scene of stories as diverse as the 1988 Moscow summit between President Ronald Reagan and Soviet Union leader Mikhail Gorbachev just before the fall of communism and the Cape Canaveral, Florida, launch of the space shuttle’s first flight after the 1986 Challenger explosion. Among his favorite projects was his long-running “Wednesday’s Child” feature, which helped place children with Big Brothers and Big Sisters.

• Alex S. Jones
Alex S. Jones

Alex S. Jones

A Pulitzer Prize winner, author, National Public Radio host and lecturer, Jones is the director of the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and also holds the school’s Laurence M. Lombard Chair in the Press and Public Policy. His family owns the Greeneville Sun in Greeneville, Tennessee, which is part of the Jones Media Network. While covering the newspaper industry for The New York Times, Jones’ 1987 story on the sale of the Bingham family media empire in Louisville, Kentucky, “The Fall of the House of Bingham,” won the Pulitzer Prize for Specialized Reporting.

• Luther Masingill
Luther Masingill

Luther Masingill

Masingill is the world’s longest-serving radio announcer working at the same station, marking more than 70 years at WDEF-FM 92.3, complemented by 60 years at WDEF-TV in Chattanooga. He is the only announcer to have reported on-air both the 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the 2011 terrorist attack on the Twin Towers in New York City, and he’s won honors ranging from the national Marconi Award to the Tennessee Association of Broadcasters’ Broadcaster of the Year Award. Masingill, who began his career in radio in 1940 and served with the 13th Airborne Signal Corps in the South Pacific in World War II, continues a busy broadcast schedule today: a renowned early-morning drive show, a daily calendar with WDEF-TV’s morning program and a daily noon radio show. His extensive community service includes his ongoing efforts to reunite lost pets with their families, working with creatures ranging from dogs and cats to snakes and llamas.

• Otis Sanford
Otis Sanford

Otis Sanford

Sanford, a longtime editor with The Commercial Appeal in Memphis, now holds the Helen and Jabie Hardin Chair of Excellence in Economics/Managerial Journalism in the Department of Journalism at the University of Memphis. The Mississippi native joined The Commercial Appeal in 1977 and was part of the reporting team that covered the 1977 death of Elvis Presley, rising through the newsroom to become managing editor and editor of opinions and editorials before moving into academia in 2011. A nationally recognized speaker on journalism ethics, education and the First Amendment, Sanford is the recipient of the Silver Em Award from his alma mater, the University of Mississippi, and the annual print journalism award at the University of Memphis was named in his honor.

• Sam Venable
Sam Venable

Sam Venable

Venable, a writer for the Knoxville News Sentinel and a news columnist since 1985, also has written 12 books featuring his wit and unique look at life and contributed to many other books as well. The Knoxville native began his career with the News Sentinel as an outdoor editor in 1970 after earning his journalism degree from the University of Tennessee and working as a police reporter and feature writer for the Knoxville Journal and Chattanooga Free Press. The winner of more than three dozen national and regional writing awards, Venable has recently become popular on the stand-up comedy stage.

The Tennessee Journalism Hall of Fame’s inaugural honorees, inducted in April 2013, were Chris Clark, retired chief news anchor for WTVF-TV NewsChannel 5; Anne Holt, a 30-year veteran and three-time Emmy winner at WKRN-TV News 2; the late Dan Miller, longtime chief news anchor and multiple Emmy Award winner at Nashville’s WSMV-TV Channel 4; the late John Seigenthaler, chairman emeritus of The Tennessean and founding editorial director of USA Today; Dean Stone, editor of The Daily Times in Maryville and former president of the Tennessee Associated Press Managing Editors; and William Bryant “Bill” Williams Jr., publisher emeritus of the Paris (Tenn.) Post-Intelligencer.

To be considered by the Hall of Fame’s board for induction, individuals must have distinguished themselves through news or business management, leadership in the industry, or in the ordinary practice of journalism. Those whose contributions have been recognized by their peers in other venues also may be considered. Inductees can include reporters, writers, editors, publishers, news directors and other managers, as well as those who have excelled in advertising or public relations and journalism, advertising and PR education.

For more information about the Tennessee Journalism Hall of Fame, visit its website at http://www.journalismhof.org or contact Hooper Penuel, TJHOF secretary, at 615-347-1672.

Sept. 26 Engineering Technology Golf Classic benefits student projects

An artist’s rendering of the Champions Run Golf Course clubhouse in Rockvale, Tennessee, site of MTSU’s third annual Engineering Technology Golf Classic. (Champions Run graphic)

Participate in MTSU’s third annual Engineering Technology Golf Classic and you will be helping fund nationally recognized student projects.

The event will be held starting at noon Friday, Sept. 26, at Champions Run Golf Course, 14262 Mount Pleasant Road, in Rockvale, Tennessee, near Eagleville.

A light lunch will kick off the activities at noon, followed by a 1 p.m. shotgun start. A silent auction will be held during the day. Following the end of play, awards will be presented and hors d’oeuvres will be served.

Sponsorship levels will include platinum ($2,000 for two teams/eight golfers), gold ($1,000) and silver ($500). Hole sponsorships are $250 and the fee for individual golfers will be $125.

Prizes will be awarded to the first-, second- and third-place teams.

RSVP by mailing your registration form and check to Jennifer Tweedie, c/o Department of Engineering Technology, P.O. Box 19, Murfreesboro, TN 37132. The deadline to enter is Monday, Sept. 1. A copy of the form is available on the department website, http://www.mtsu.edu/et/, or call 615-898-5009.

Walter Boles, Engineering Technology chair, said thousands of dollars are needed annually to defray expenses incurred by the various team projects, which gain the department and university considerable recognition when competing against other colleges and universities.

 The Experimental Vehicle Program and other projects include the solar boat, the moon buggy or NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge vehicle, the Raider Robotics Team, alternative energy and other technology-based ventures. The solar boat and moon buggy earned “Best Design” awards during national competitions this year. Both will be on display at the tournament.

The Davis Groupe of Murfreesboro is a primary sponsor. Engineering technology is one of 11 departments in the College of Basic and Applied Sciences.

To learn more about Engineering Technology’s offerings, including mechatronics engineering, visit the department website above and http://www.mtsu.edu/programs/engineering/.

For more information, call 615-898-5009 or email Jennifer.Tweedie@mtsu.edu.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU’s third annual Engineering Technology Golf Classic will be held Friday, Sept. 26, at Champions Run Golf Course in Rockvale, Tennessee. Pictured are participants from the 2013 event. (Submitted photo)

Upcoming workshop helps investigators evaluate death scenes

MTSU’s 2014 Death Scene Investigation Workshop, set Aug. 13-14 on campus, is aiming to help the people who work with death sites get ready to secure, investigate and prosecute deadly crimes.

Click on the poster to register or for more details on the workshop.

Click on the poster to register or for more details on the workshop.

The free workshop, sponsored by MTSU’s Forensic Institute for Research and Education, is open to law enforcement agencies, prosecutors, first responders such as emergency medical services and fire personnel, public defenders and medical examiners.

With the help of professionals from various specialties, including Dr. Hugh Berryman, MTSU professor of anthropology and the director of the Forensic Institute for Research and Education, the workshop will address the role of the medical examiner, forensic anthropology, mass fatalities, drug overdose and child death investigations.

Attendees also can earn Continuing Education Unit or Continuing Professional Education credits for the workshop.

To register for the workshop or get more information, including an agenda, please visit www.mtsu.edu/fire/Law_Enforcement_Training.php or contact the Forensic Institute for Research and Education, or FIRE, at fire@mtsu.edu.

The 2014 Death Scene Investigation Workshop is supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU WISTEM Center’s guest speaker energizes Nashville teens (+VIDEO)

The conversation from a national official to a group of budding East Nashville scientists was profound and to the point: Persevere. Stay focused. Never give up. Do and be your best at all times.

These were some of the energizing messages LaDoris “Dot” Harris, a director with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, shared with nearly 40 East Nashville youth attending the June 17 Green Girls STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education program at Martha O’Bryan Center (http://www.marthaobryan.org).

Harris spent nearly 90 minutes with the teenagers, who participate in the program that promotes renewable energy. Harris was invited to speak by MTSU WISTEM (Women in STEM) Center Director Judith Iriarte-Gross, who had heard Harris communicate with passion about her career in 2013 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

“My message to the Martha O’Bryan school is one of perseverance, never give up and stay focused on what you’re doing,” said Harris.

MTSU chemistry professor and WISTEM Center Director Judith Iriarte-Gross, left, and Dot Harris, director, Office of Economic Impact and Diversity in the U.S. Department of Energy, admire the renewable energy home models built by middle school students attending the Martha O'Bryan Center in Nashville July 17. MTSU students work one day a week with the East Nashville teenagers in the Green Girls program. Iriarte-Gross oversees the WISTEM (Women in STEM) program. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

MTSU chemistry professor and WISTEM Center Director Judith Iriarte-Gross, left, and Dot Harris, director, Office of Economic Impact and Diversity in the U.S. Department of Energy, admire the renewable energy home models built by middle school students attending the Martha O’Bryan Center in Nashville July 17. MTSU students work one day a week with the East Nashville teenagers in the Green Girls program. Iriarte-Gross oversees the WISTEM (Women in STEM) program. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

Near the end of Harris’ visit, she and Iriarte-Gross helped judge an activity where six teams competed in a design contest to create green energy homes. The middle school students used crafts and cardboard boxes to build their houses in the days preceding the guest speaker’s appearance.

“As I told the kids, I’ve been to probably 20-plus countries around the globe, and nothing’s more amazing and more innovative/creative than the mind of an American kid,” she said. “We have to have them first understand themselves that they are capable (of achieving). Once they understand and appreciate the values of themselves first, you’ll be amazed how they flourish and grow from that.”

Among the attendees was MTSU sophomore chemistry major Josh Loomis of Murfreesboro, one of two WISTEM Center student participants who work directly with the Martha O’Bryan Center teens in the program.

Other MTSU personnel attending included:

• Marian Wilson, new assistant to the president for Institutional Equity and Compliance; and

• Rose Johnson, grants coordinator for the College of Basic and Applied Sciences.

Knoxville, Tennessee-based TN-SCORE Outreach Director Samantha K. Brown and Outreach Coordinator Angela Gilley represented their agency, which also sponsored the summer program in addition to providing opportunities to develop platforms for enhanced research capacity and greater competitiveness within all of Tennessee’s diverse academic institutions. To learn more, visit http://www.tnepscor.org/.

Junior biology major Caleb Hough of Murfreesboro was unable to attend because of a class commitment, Iriarte-Gross said, adding that Hough works with the center teens once a week.

For more information about the WISTEM Center, call 615-494-7763 or email Iriarte-Gross at Judith.Iriarte-Gross@mtsu.edu.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Dot Harris, director in the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity for the U.S. Dept. of Energy, promotes STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) to middle school students participating in the Green Girl program at the Martha O'Bryan Center in Nashville July 17.

Dot Harris, director in the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity for the U.S. Dept. of Energy, promotes STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) to middle school students participating in the Green Girl program at the Martha O’Bryan Center in Nashville July 17.