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Summer opportunities to visit MTSU abound for prospective students

Prospective MTSU students and their families wanting to visit campus this summer have ample opportunities.

Now through Friday, Aug. 7, campus tours will be offered Monday through Friday starting at 10 a.m. in the Student Services and Admissions Center, 1860 Blue Raider Drive.

MTSU daily campus tours and special Saturday tours are led by Office of Admissions Blue Elite team members like K.G. Kennedy, center, shown in this file photo. (MTSU file photo)

MTSU daily campus tours and special Saturday tours are led by Office of Admissions Blue Elite team members like K.G. Kennedy, center, shown in this file photo. (MTSU file photo)

Special Saturday tours will be offered starting at 10 a.m. July 18 and Aug. 1.

To register, visit www.mtsu.edu/tours.

The daily campus and special Saturday tours include an information session, housing tour and visits inside the Campus Recreation Center, James E. Walker Library, Science Building, John Bragg Mass Communication Building and Business and Aerospace Building.

Housing tours are available each weekday at 12:15 and 3:15 p.m., departing from the Keathley University Center, room 300.  For more information, please call 615-898-2971 or email housing@mtsu.edu.

To find parking and campus buildings, view a printable campus map at www.mtsu.edu/maps.

To contact admissions, call 615-898-2233 or email admissions@mtsu.edu. For questions about tours, call 615-898-5670 or email tours@mtsu.edu.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Still time to register for Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp July 27-31

Registration is open and space is still available for a fun-filled week of rock, rhythm and recording information at the 13th annual Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp, set July 27-31 at MTSU.

Tuition is $310 per camper with a 5 percent discount for siblings if they enroll at the same time. Registration information is available at https://campscui.active.com/orgs/YEAH, and camp scholarship applications are available at http://yeahintheboro.org/camp-scholarships.

The camp is open to girls ages 10 to 17. MTSU alumna Kelley Anderson, a co-founder of Those Darlins and a professional musician and audio engineer, created the Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp in 2003 to give young women an empowering, positive place for self-expression through music.

Camp activities include instruction from experienced musicians in beginning and advanced guitar, beginning and advanced drums, keyboards, vocals, electronic music and bass.

The camp will culminate in a showcase that is open to the public. You can watch a video from the 2014 showcase below.

https://youtu.be/AJVgl2Yyi7w

Workshops in recording, screen printing, photography, image and identity and music “herstory” also will be provided. There also will be daily lunchtime performances from local acts such as Wildfront, Sallow, Becky Buller and many more.

Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp is a program of Youth Empowerment through Arts and Humanities, or YEAH!, a Murfreesboro-based nonprofit organization. For more information, contact YEAH! at 615-849-8140 or artsempoweryouth@gmail.comm, or visit the SGRRC Facebook page.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Young musicians celebrate the 2013 Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp inside MTSU's Wright Music Hall in this file photo provided by Youth Empowerment through Arts and Humanities.

Young musicians celebrate the 2013 Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp inside MTSU’s Wright Music Hall in this file photo provided by Youth Empowerment through Arts and Humanities.

Young programmers ‘scratch’ the surface at MTSU Coding Camp

The need to expand Camp STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) at MTSU and offer more hands-on opportunities for computer-savvy teenagers brought on the first Coding Camp at MTSU June 15-19.

Youngsters from Murfreesboro and Franklin, Tennessee, are attending the camp, which is being taught by Gayle Porterfield, who teachers sixth-graders at Mitchell-Neilson Elementary School.

Coding camp at MTSU participants Condoleezza Rankins, left, 12, of Murfreesboro, Nora Peebles-Ross, 11, of Smyrna, Tennessee, and Addesyn Frink, 11, of Franklin, Tennessee, work to properly connect wires involved in their June 17 project as teacher Gayle Porterfield observes in a Kirksey Old Main computer lab. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

Coding camp at MTSU participants Condoleezza Rankins, left, 12, of Murfreesboro, Nora Peebles-Ross, 11, of Smyrna, Tenn., and Addesyn Frink, 11, of Franklin, Tenn., work to properly connect wires involved in their June 17 project as teacher Gayle Porterfield observes in a Kirksey Old Main computer lab. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

In computer programming, coding is the process of designing, writing, testing, troubleshooting and maintaining the source code of programs.

Utilizing a number of fun programs, Porterfield — with assistance from high schoolers who are proficient in computer programming — is helping the youngsters grow in their knowledge of coding.

The students are learning to incorporate new concepts they learn by building complex games, animations and interactive stories such as Pacman and Pong.

The campers are being taught Scratch, HTML, CSS, jQuery and more.

Scratch is a free programming language and online community where participants can create their own interactive stories, games and animations.

HTML, an acronym for HyperText Markup Language, is the standard language to create Web pages.

Cascading style sheets, or CSS, is a language used for describing the look and formatting of a document written in a markup language.

jQuery is a cross-platform JavaScript library designed to simplify the scripting of HTML. The 8-year-old jQuery is considered the most popular JavaScript library in use today.

The students also are taking part in a Google Hangout with special invited guests for an interactive makers session.

David Lockett, who teaches fourth-graders at Homer Pittard Campus School, is the Camp STEM director.

For more information about the coding camp, the various STEM camps or the 2016 Summer Math Institute at MTSU, call Lockett at 615-415-7963, email him at David.Lockett@mtsu.edu or visit www.campSTEM.us.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

As Nashville television videographer Charlie Woodward films them, coding camp at MTSU participants David Wilson, foreground, of Murfreesboro and Jackson Smith of Franklin, Tennessee, work with software programs. Wilson, 13, will be a rising eighth-grader at Oakland Middle School while Smith, 15, will be a rising sophomore at Centennial High School. Assisting Smith is Cruz Jean, 17, of Murfreesboro, a rising junior at Central Magnet School.

As Nashville television videographer Charlie Woodward films them, coding camp at MTSU participants David Wilson, foreground, of Murfreesboro and Jackson Smith of Franklin, Tenn., work with software programs. Wilson, 13, is a rising eighth-grader at Oakland Middle School while Smith, 15, is a rising sophomore at Centennial High School. Assisting Smith is Cruz Jean, 17, of Murfreesboro, a rising senior at Central Magnet School.

As Elijah Moore, 11, left, of Murfreesboro works with a software program, Mitchell-Neilson Elementary sixth-grade teacher Gayle Porterfield answers questions about coding June 17 in a Kirksey Old Main computer lab. For the first time, Camp STEM is offering a coding camp to stimulate middle school and homeschool students.

As Elijah Moore, 11, left, of Murfreesboro works with a software program, Mitchell-Neilson Elementary sixth-grade teacher Gayle Porterfield answers questions about coding June 17 in a Kirksey Old Main computer lab. For the first time, Camp STEM is offering a coding camp to stimulate middle school and homeschool students. Moore is a rising sixth-grader at Oakland Middle School.

Still time to register for Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp July 27-31

Registration is open and space is still available for a fun-filled week of rock, rhythm and recording information at the 13th annual Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp, set July 27-31 at MTSU.

Tuition is $310 per camper with a 5 percent discount for siblings if they enroll at the same time. Registration information is available at https://campscui.active.com/orgs/YEAH, and camp scholarship applications are available at http://yeahintheboro.org/camp-scholarships.

The camp is open to girls ages 10 to 17. MTSU alumna Kelley Anderson, a co-founder of Those Darlins and a professional musician and audio engineer, created the Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp in 2003 to give young women an empowering, positive place for self-expression through music.

Camp activities include instruction from experienced musicians in beginning and advanced guitar, beginning and advanced drums, keyboards, vocals, electronic music and bass.

The camp will culminate in a showcase that is open to the public. You can watch a video from the 2014 showcase below.

https://youtu.be/AJVgl2Yyi7w

Workshops in recording, screen printing, photography, image and identity and music “herstory” also will be provided. There also will be daily lunchtime performances from local acts such as Wildfront, Sallow, Becky Buller and many more.

Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp is a program of Youth Empowerment through Arts and Humanities, or YEAH!, a Murfreesboro-based nonprofit organization. For more information, contact YEAH! at 615-849-8140 or artsempoweryouth@gmail.comm, or visit the SGRRC Facebook page.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Young musicians celebrate the 2013 Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp inside MTSU's Wright Music Hall in this file photo provided by Youth Empowerment through Arts and Humanities.

Young musicians celebrate the 2013 Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp inside MTSU’s Wright Music Hall in this file photo provided by Youth Empowerment through Arts and Humanities.

MT Sampler Camp gives youths a glimpse of college [+VIDEO]

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Middle school students from across the region beginning to think about college and careers experienced a variety of MTSU offerings during the MT Sampler Camp June 8-12.

Camp Director Nancy Stubblefield, an adviser in the College of Mass Communication, arranged for more than 20 middle schoolers to check out segments of business, horse science, chemistry and physics, education, art and much more during the weeklong camp.

https://youtu.be/HBJ-yKMRKSw

One three-pronged field trip off-campus June 9 included visits to MTSU aerospace facilities at Murfreesboro Airport just off Memorial Boulevard, the Horse Science Center and the Tennessee Miller Coliseum on West Thompson Lane and the MTSU Farm and Dairy on Guy James Road in Lascassas, Tennessee.

The June 22-26 MT Sampler Camp for high school students is full with 40 students registered.

To inquire about the 2016 MT Sampler Camp, look for information to become available at www.mtsu.edu/sampler or contact Stubblefield at Nancy.Stubblefield@mtsu.edu.

For now, she plans to hold one camp in 2016 that will be for rising eighth- through 11th-graders.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

As MT Sampler Camp participants Zac Music, left, and Bradie McCarty share a laugh while watching, MTSU's Johnny Haffner performs an ultrasound, showing them the method used on pregnant horses in the Horse Science Center. MT Sampler Camp youngsters toured the facility and Tennessee Miller Coliseum June 9. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

MT Sampler Camp participants Zac Music, left, and Bradie McCarty laugh while watching MTSU’s Johnny Haffner perform an ultrasound, showing them the method used on pregnant horses in the university’s Horse Science Center. MT Sampler Camp youngsters toured the Horse Science Center and Tennessee Miller Coliseum June 9. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

Micah Owens, 12, of Cookeville, Tennessee, visits with a horse named Junior in the MTSU Horse Science Center stable area on West Thompson Lane June 9 during a visit by MT Sampler Camp participants. Owens, who said she is allergic to horses, is a homeschooled student and granddaughter of Dr. Rosemary Owens, MTSU coordinator of strategic university partnerships for the office of the provost. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

Micah Owens, 12, of Cookeville, Tennessee, visits with a horse named Junior in the MTSU Horse Science Center stable area on West Thompson Lane June 9 during a visit by MT Sampler Camp participants. Owens, who said she is allergic to horses, is a homeschooled student and granddaughter of Dr. Rosemary Owens, MTSU coordinator of strategic university partnerships for the office of the provost.

MTSU camp introduces youngsters to all things aviation [+VIDEO]

From unmanned aircraft to flying to maintenance, 30 high school students from across Tennessee experienced the various aspects of the profession during the MTSU aerospace Introduction to Aviation Camp June 1-5.

The camp was held both at the Jean A. Jack Flight Operations Center and other MTSU facilities at Murfreesboro Airport and in aerospace technology labs in the Business and Aerospace Building.

https://youtu.be/63mm_-2RdtU

Coordinated by MTSU’s nationally respected Department of Aerospace, the activities included unmanned aircraft systems, pro pilot, flight simulators, maintenance management and the air traffic control and technology laboratories.

“We’ve been rotating them through the various stations, representing all of the operational aspects of aviation,” said professor Wendy Beckman, the director of the fifth-year camp.

Wearing earplugs and safety glasses, Introduction to Aviation camper Carson Rogers, left, of Murfreesboro listens June 3 as MTSU associate professor Joe Hawkins explains maintenance and working mechanisms for the loud engine. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

Wearing earplugs and safety glasses, Introduction to Aviation camper Carson Rogers, left, of Murfreesboro listens June 3 as MTSU associate professor Joe Hawkins explains maintenance and working mechanisms for the loud engine. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

“It has been a great experience,” said Tim Potter, 16, of Christiana, Tennessee, midway through the camp. “You get to fly and see how things run. You see the job opportunities, such as unmanned aircraft and the transporting of goods and freight.”

Potter, a rising Riverdale High School sophomore, has aviation in his genes. His father, Tim, flies for UPS.

Carson Rogers, 12, of Murfreesboro, a rising seventh-grader at Central Magnet School, said what he found interesting was “learning about how plane parts are made.”

Weather, which included fog and low clouds, delayed flights in the Introduction to Aviation Camp.

The Professional Pilot Advanced Camp, which is full, will be held June 15-17 in the MTSU facilities at the airport. This camp offers three days of flight-oriented instruction.

To learn more about the camps and about registering for either camp in 2016, visit www.mtsu.edu/aerospace.

For more information about the camps or the aerospace program, call the department at 615-898-2788 or email Mary Lou Cornett at Marylou.Cornett@mtsu.edu or Beckman at Wendy.Beckman@mtsu.edu.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Alex Lomis, left, observes MTSU flight instructor Zach Hutcherson following cockpit and airplane safety precautions June 3 in the Introduction to Aviation Camp at Murfreeesboro Airport.

Alex Lomis, left, observes MTSU flight instructor Zach Hutcherson following cockpit and airplane safety precautions June 3 in the Introduction to Aviation Camp at Murfreeesboro Airport.

MTSU to host institute for educators on ‘experiential learning’

Registration is open for an upcoming daylong institute at Middle Tennessee State University for community college and university educators interested in incorporating experiential learning concepts into their classrooms.

The Institute of Experiential Learning will be held from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 17, at MTSU’s James Walker Library.

In this 2014 file photo, MTSU student Maria Rojano, left, a sophomore graphic design major, stopped by the healthy eating booth during April's Health Fair held in the Student Union atrium by professor Mary Beth Asbury's Health Campaigns experiential learning class. Offering Rojano a sample of fruit-infused water is Starlethia Hicks, a junior organizational communication major from Nashville and one of five team members that set up the healthy eating booth. (MTSU file photo)

In this 2014 file photo, MTSU student Maria Rojano, left, a sophomore graphic design major from Nashville, stops by the healthy eating booth during a Health Fair held in the Student Union atrium by professor Mary Beth Asbury’s Health Campaigns experiential learning class. Offering Rojano a sample of fruit-infused water is Starlethia Hicks, a junior organizational communication major from Nashville. (MTSU file photo)

Attendees will learn how MTSU has infused experiential and service learning into academic courses to create a national model that is both sustainable and replicable.

Carol Swayze

Carol Swayze

Cost is $25 for non-MTSU faculty and free for MTSU faculty who register. Participants will earn Continuing Education Unit (CEU) credit and a certificate. Registration and more details are available at http://bit.ly/1IhtbqJ. Seating is limited, so early registration is encouraged.

In 2006, MTSU established an Experiential Learning Scholars (EXL) Program to enhance student learning through hands-on learning activities incorporated into academic courses. The campuswide initiative currently includes courses in all six colleges and includes 26 academic departments.

“The EXL Program is a direct result of MTSU’s commitment to student success,” said EXL Director Carol Swayze. “National research and MTSU data reveal the connection between experiential learning and higher student achievement. With the success of our program over the past decade, other institutions are now looking at adopting our program as a model for student engagement and achievement.”

EXL color logo webMTSU was awarded a commendation by the regional higher education accrediting body as a model quality enhancement program, and the EXL Program has won both the regional and national awards for best practices in programming.

MTSU is sponsoring the EXL Institute open to share information and guide development of best practices across the region. A variety of presenters will explore how the program has been institutionalized and how students earn the honor of the EXL Scholar Designation upon graduation.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee has praised EXL for improving student retention, noting that the six-year graduation rate for students taking EXL courses is 86 percent, well above average.

“Being an EXL student has literally changed my life,” said Chloe Truitt, a 2015 liberal arts graduate and EXL scholar. “The only part I have regrets about is not starting sooner. I would highly recommend this program to any student, professor and university. It has been a game-changer in higher education, and I will be forever grateful for this opportunity.”

For more information on EXL, visit http://mtsu.edu/exl.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

Camp STEM at MTSU gathers steam in June with young learners [+VIDEO]

As evidenced by the elementary school youngsters having fun while learning on a college campus, Camp STEM at MTSU is gathering steam.

Four weeks in June will find Murfreesboro City and Rutherford County students on campus, where they will grow in science, technology, engineering and math skills.

https://youtu.be/uHiZR0TaJPo

Led by director David Lockett, a fourth-grade teacher at Homer Pittard Campus School, Camp STEM pushes children interested in the STEM disciplines to increase their knowledge and have fun at the same time.

A group of elementary school-age boys participating in the first week of Camp STEM at MTSU recycle plastic bottles by turning them into a robot on wheels in a Kirksey Old Main classroom. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

A group of elementary school boys participating in the first week of Camp STEM at MTSU recycle plastic bottles by turning them into a robot on wheels in a Kirksey Old Main classroom. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

The camp is founded on the principle that students want exciting, challenging and life-impacting STEM experiences. Its goal is to demonstrate how STEM works in the real world by providing hands-on activities in STEM.

Camp STEM is a series of four one-week camps focusing on the areas of science, technology, engineering and math. An average of 25 to 50 children attend each week.

“Each week, we focus on something different, whether it’s robotics, recycling, art, earth science … something to pique students’ curiosity,” Lockett said.

The first and third weeks of the camp will focus on robotics. June 8-12 will pick up steam as the arts are added to the STEM elements. June 22-26, the final week, touches on earth and space science.

Science-driven Camp STEM also provides spring and fall break options in addition to the June opportunity.

For more information, visit www.campstem.us/about-us, email Lockett at David.Lockett@mtsu.edu or info@campSTEM.us or call 615-415-7963 or 615-569-5904.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Wesley Gross, 11, left, and Brooklyn Elizabeth Moore, 9, maneuver the MTSU Experimental Vehicles Program lunar rover through a parking lot as part of Camp STEM robotic activities June 2. The two are rising sixth- and fourth-graders, respectively, at Homer Pittard Campus School.

Wesley Gross, 11, left, and Brooklyn Elizabeth Moore, 9, maneuver the MTSU Experimental Vehicles Program lunar rover through a parking lot as part of Camp STEM robotic activities June 2. The two are rising sixth- and fourth-graders, respectively, at Homer Pittard Campus School.

MTSU offers Summer Math Institute June 8-10 students in grades 7-12

Rising seventh- through 12th-graders looking to grow in mathematics can achieve this through the Summer Math Institute at MTSU.

Math sign72The 2½-day camp will be held Monday through Wednesday, June 8-10, in Rooms 141 and 149 in the College of Education Building. To register online, visit www.campSTEM.us.

Program highlights include modeling and real-world applications, graphing, problem-solving, strategies, games and puzzles, logic and reasoning and on-campus departmental visits.

Teachers for the camp will be Victoria Hamlin and Brittany Sikorski. Hamlin is an instructor in the MTSU Department of Mathematical Sciences.

The Summer Math Institute at MTSU is tuition-based. A fee of $75 covers all activities, snacks and supply costs. Financial aid opportunities are available for students needing assistance.

For more information, contact David Lockett at 615-415-7963 or email him at David.Lockett@mtsu.edu. He teaches fourth-graders at Homer Pittard Campus School.

An MTSU Department of Mathematical Sciences faculty member’s find can be viewed in a glass case on the second floor of Kirksey Old Main. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

MTSU, Olive Branch to host event for prospective students of faith

The Middle Tennessee State University Office of Admissions is partnering with Olive Branch Church to reach Rutherford County high school juniors and seniors of faith.

Vincent Windrow

Vincent Windrow

The “Education and Faith Night” will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday, May 31, at Olive Branch’s location at 1115 Minerva Drive in east Murfreesboro.

“We’re hosting a fun community event to promote the importance of education and how students can remain involved in their faith while in college,” said Vincent Windrow, pastor of Olive Branch and interim assistant vice provost for student success at MTSU.

MTSU admissions staff will be on hand to discuss the university’s offerings, assist with the application process and answer financial aid questions.

The event will also include free food and games and activities such as a football-throwing contest, corn hole competition and rock-wall climbing.

“This event is a great opportunity for students and parents in Rutherford County to gain more knowledge about MTSU up close and personal,” Windrow added. “It’s designed not to be religiously stuffy but rather to be part of the ongoing effort to strengthen the relationship between the university and the community – rain or shine.”

For more information about MTSU’s offerings, visit www.mtsu.edu.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU Olive Branch flier