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Baldwin Photo Gallery exhibit features work by conference speakers

MTSU’s Baldwin Photographic Gallery is featuring the works of Huger Foote and Michael Peven in a special free exhibit open through Thursday, Oct. 17, in conjunction with the upcoming Society for Photographic Education 2014 regional conference on campus.

Baldwin Gallery logo webBoth Foote, an established commercial photographer, and Peven, director of the photography program at the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, are set to speak during the Oct. 2-5 South Central regional conference.

Their work is being showcased in MTSU’s nationally renowned Baldwin Photographic Gallery, located in Room 269 inside the Bragg Mass Communication Building on the MTSU campus, weekdays from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.

The gallery is open to the public by appointment. Guests can schedule a visit by contacting MTSU photography professor Tom Jimison, who has curated the gallery since 1991, at tom.jimison@mtsu.edu.

Memphis native Foote received a commission in 2011 from the New York Times to capture the city during springtime. A notorious wanderer of back alleys, deserted roadways and abandoned lots and a keen observer of the commonplace, Foote combines color, tight composition, and intense light and shadows to transform mundane objects into large-scale observations of the world.

Photographer Huger Foote’s “Peaches” is part of a new exhibit on display through Oct. 17 at MTSU’s Baldwin Photographic Gallery in conjunction with the upcoming Society for Photographic Education South Central regional conference.

Foote is set to present the Society for Photographic Education South Central conference’s keynote address at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 3, in Room S102, the State Farm Room, in MTSU’s Business and Aerospace Building. A searchable campus map with parking details is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap14-15.

Photographer Michael Peven’s bookwork project “Open … Heart Surgery” is part of a new exhibit on display through Oct. 17 at MTSU’s Baldwin Photographic Gallery.

Peven, a Chicago native who teaches studio photography, the history of photography and bookmaking at Arkansas, works in a wide variety of photographic and photo-related media and has recently been involved with projects in computer-assisted environment specific installations and limited-edition artist’s bookworks. His work has been part of more than a hundred group exhibitions since 1975.

Peven will speak at the SPE regional conference beginning at 6 p.m. Oct. 3 in the BAS State Farm Room.

The Society for Photographic Education’s South Central regional conference is focusing on “Engaging Possibilities.” The four-day event will include workshops, presentations and demonstrations by SPE members, as well as a film screening, portfolio reviews and member and special exhibits.

You can find more conference details, including ticket prices and a complete schedule, at http://southcentral.spenational.org/conference.

The Society for Photographic Education is a nonprofit organization that provides and fosters an understanding of photography as a means of diverse creative expression, cultural insight and experimental practice.

You can learn more about the Baldwin Photographic Gallery at its website, http://baldwinphotogallery.com.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Nashville True Blue Tour event will draw 500 people to Rocketown

MTSU transfer enrollment coordinator Jeremy Mills, left, discusses admissions procedures and scholarship deadlines with Tina Nevette of Franklin, Tenn., and her daughter, Tierra Larkin, in this fall 2013 file photo. MTSU’s True Blue Tour visits Rocketown, 601 Fourth Ave. S., in Nashville. The student reception will begin at 6 p.m. (MTSU file photo by News and Media Relations)

Nashville will be the fourth stop on the statewide Middle Tennessee State University True Blue Tour to recruit outstanding students from the Midstate.

MTSU will hold the True Blue Tour reception for all area high school and potential transfer students and their families from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 30, at Rocketown, 601 Fourth Ave. S., in Nashville.

To register in advance, visit www.mtsu.edu/rsvp.

The recently announced MTSU Student Success Advantage, which is full of incentives for future students to graduate in four years, and the $147 million Science Building will be on President Sidney A. McPhee’s agenda when talking to prospective students, their parents or guardians and alumni.

The event — where deans and personnel from admissions and other academic departments share options and answer questions — also will feature interactive displays, including the $1.8 million Electronic Media Communication mobile production truck and the Concrete Industry Management Program’s mold to make concrete coasters by hand. A music CD will be available at the School of Music table.

McPhee will be pitching the recently announced “Graduate in 4 (years) and Get More” program that highlights the Student Success Advantage for students starting in fall 2015. The program adds $1,000 back to eligible Hope Scholarship recipients during the first two years, guarantees scholarships to eligible transfer students and returns tuition increases to eligible students who stay on track to graduate in four years.

To learn more, visit www.mtsunews.com/student-success-advantage.

The Science Building, which will be dedicated at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 15, and other major changes regarding future scholarship and financial aid opportunities for MTSU students will top McPhee’s remarks.

“The (science) building is already helping MTSU create more science graduates to fill high-tech jobs,” McPhee said. “It immediately makes MTSU more competitive for research projects, science scholarship and entrepreneurial efforts.”

2014-15 MTSU Student Government Association President Andrew George shows his True Blue spirit. (Graphic by Creative and Visual Services)

MTSU’s 2014-15 Student Government Association president, Andrew George, shows his True Blue spirit in this ad for the True Blue Tour.

MTSU will treat area high school counselors and community college representatives to a luncheon at 11:30 a.m. To register in advance, visit www.mtsu.edu/rsvp.

After Nashville, the caravan will finish the tour with stops in Memphis Oct. 22 and Jackson Oct. 23. Before coming to Nashville, MTSU visited Chattanooga, Johnson City and Knoxville.

Prospective students have multiple opportunities for a firsthand look at campus.

Fall Preview Days will be held Saturday, Sept. 27 and Nov. 1.

True Blue Experience Days will be held Oct. 17 for prospective students in the College of Basic and Applied Sciences; Jan. 23, 2015, for prospective students in the Colleges of Behavioral and Health Sciences and Liberal Arts; and Jan. 30 for prospective students in the Colleges of Mass Communication, Business and Education. To register, visit www.mtsu.edu/rsvp.

The priority deadline to apply and receive scholarship consideration is Dec. 1.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

 

MTSU True Blue Tour touches 700 people in Knoxville, Johnson City

Elyssa Hurley, left, and her mother, Estelle, both from Lenoir City, Tennessee, discuss the technical qualities and capabilities of the Department of Electronic Media Communication mobile production truck during the Knoxville True Blue Tour visit Sept. 23. Elyssa Hurley is a sophomore at the Lenoir City campus of Roane State Community College and plans to study history and film. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

It is a tale of two Tennessee cities — Johnson City and Knoxville — visited recently by the MTSU administrative caravan on the True Blue Tour.

The 600-mile-plus round trip visit to East and upper East Tennessee to recruit outstanding students for the 2015-16 academic year and beyond proved fruitful. More than 700 people, including 76 students in Johnson City and 160 in Knoxville, were greeted by MTSU admissions, academic personnel and university administrators led by President Sidney A. McPhee.

Prospective students, their parents or other guests heard presentations from McPhee, Student Affairs’ Vice President Deb Sells and current students Zach Hutcherson of Greeneville and Felicia Adkins of Kingston. They also viewed videos, obtained various printed materials and met and posed questions to MTSU officials.

At The Millennium Centre in Johnson City, Sullivan Central High School senior Mariana Valdez of Kingsport said MTSU “is probably my first choice” for college.

“I want to go into recording technology, and I heard it is a really good school. I’m looking forward to going there,” Valdez said. MTSU’s Department of Recording Industry is one of the university’s signature programs.

MTSU College of Mass Communication Dean Ken Paulson, right, shares information about the Department of Electronic Media Communication with Carl Markland of Roan Mountain, Tennessee, during the Sept. 22 True Blue Tour student reception in Johnson City. Markland is a senior at Cloudland High School. Also pictured is his mother, Samantha Johnson.

Carl Markland, a senior at Cloudland High School in Roan Mountain, attended with his mother and stepfather, Sandra and Adam Johnson. Markland is interested in agriculture.

Donna Brabson of Friendsville was invited to the high school counselors and community college advisers luncheon at The Foundry in Knoxville Sept. 23. Jamie Brabson, her daughter, is a senior education major.

“I spread the word (about MTSU),” Donna Brabson said. “Jamie has had a very good experience there. She has been in BCM (Baptist Collegiate Ministry). She’s very blessed.”

Roane State Community College sophomore Elyssa Hurley and her mother, Estelle, live in Lenoir City. They toured the Department of Electronic Media Communications $1.8 million mobile production truck outside The Foundry.

Elyssa Hurley, who wants to study history and film, found MTSU “more impressive than other schools” she is considering.

Thomas Gunter, a video journalist with the Knoxville NBC affiliate WBIR-TV, said the EMC truck “is an impressive vehicle.”

“The response we’ve gotten (in Chattanooga, Johnson City and Knoxville) has been tremendous,” said Mike Forbes, an EMC assistant director.

“We’re glad to showcase this to students who want to come to MTSU, and we always showcase our students’ work.”

Equally impressive were Hutcherson and Adkins, current students who shared about their MTSU experience and life on the Murfreesboro campus.

Hutcherson, an aerospace major in the College of Basic and Applied Sciences, serves as a flight instructor, is a member of Blue Elite and entered MTSU as a Buchanan Fellow in the Honors College.

“My MTSU experience has been great,” said Hutcherson, 20. “They’ve got me involved in my industry and created an environment that connects you with your university. The technology and connections in the industry give me prospects for a good job.”

Felicia Adkins

Adkins, 19, a sophomore physical education major minoring in dance, has aspirations of being a Dallas Cowboys cheerleader. She calls her MTSU experience “wonderful.” She is a member of Alpha Delta Pi sorority and the dance team and works on campus, teaching hip-hop classes at the rec center.

“Everything I have been involved with so far has been a positive experience,” said Adkins, whose backup plan if the Dallas dream job falls through is to be an elementary school teacher “because I love working with children, being a role model to help children better themselves.”

Adkins enjoyed a family reunion: Her parents, Bob and Tracy Adkins; sister, Aslyn, 10; and grandparents, M.L. and Norma Faye Atkins — all from Kingston — attended.

Family ties also prevailed for MTSU alumna and College of Education Dean Lana Seivers, a Clinton native, whose mother, Frankie Seivers, attended the event, as did Rebekah Johnson, daughter of Honors College Dean John Vile, who enjoyed introducing 5-week-old grandson Christopher Johnson to his MTSU colleagues. In Johnson City, Honors staff member Laura Clippard and her mother and stepfather, Shirley and Charles Dean Von Cannon, enjoyed a brief reunion.

McPhee met with alumni at both venues. They included Clint and Missy Bond Davis, and Greg and Melanie McDavid Lamb in Johnson City, and Ben Landers, Patrick Morrison, Stephanie Workman and Larry Cox in Knoxville.

MTSU travels to Nashville Tuesday, Sept. 30, for an 11:30 a.m. luncheon for high school counselors and community college advisers and a 6 to 8 p.m. student reception. The tour visits Memphis and Jackson Oct. 22-23, respectively.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Zach Hutcherson, foreground, tells people attending the MTSU True Blue Tour event in Johnson City, Tennessee, about his experiences as an undergraduate student. He is a sophomore aerospace major from Greeneville, Tennessee.

 

Chattanooga senior sold on MTSU long before True Blue Tour event

Tyner Academy senior Deasia Reynolds of Chattanooga, Tennessee, talks to MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee regarding the academic possibilities in pursuit of a nursing degree. They visited Sept. 17 during the annual True Blue Tour student reception at the Chattanooga Convention Center. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. — High school senior Deasia Reynolds of Chattanooga never visited the Middle Tennessee State University campus in Murfreesboro until 2013.

But the Tyner Academy student knew as a 10-year-old fifth-grader in 2007 that she wanted to go to MTSU.

“I’d love to go to school at MT,” Reynolds said with excitement. “It’s my favorite school in the whole world. I hope to get accepted.”

Along with nearly 200 Chattanooga-area students and more than 200 additional guests, Reynolds attended the annual MTSU True Blue Tour, held Sept. 17 at the Chattanooga Convention Center.

Chattanooga was the first leg in the statewide tour, which includes visits to Johnson City, Knoxville, Nashville, Memphis and Jackson.

Reynolds said she makes all A’s, carries a 3.7 GPA and ranks 10th in her class. She said she plans to pursue nursing and hopes it will be with the MTSU School of Nursing, one of the College of Behavioral and Health Sciences departments.

Current MTSU junior Agnes Porter of Chattanooga spoke to her peers during the reception.

Porter, who graduated several years ahead of Reynolds at East Hamilton, said she “loves the diversity of the campus, not just in race, but age also has an impact on the diversity that the campus offers.

Patty Bumpass, left, a senior at East Hamilton High School in Chattanooga, Tennessee, makes a concrete coast with the guidance of MTSU Concrete Industry Management faculty member Jon Huddleston Sept. 17 during the True Blue Tour event at the Chattanooga Convention Center. An overflow crowd attended on the first stop of the six-city tour.

“It is interesting to listen to how life experiences shape our views and how that is expressed through our use of class discussions, especially in the political science department,” added Porter, who was joined at the event by her entire immediate family.

At MTSU, Porter majors in public administration in the College of Liberal Arts and multimedia journalism in the College of Mass Communication. The HOPE Lottery Scholarship recipient works in the Career Development Center and served as a peer mentor for the Scholars Academy Summer Institute for incoming freshmen this year.

The 3.88 GPA student anticipates graduating in December 2016 and has lofty career ambitions.

“I would like to either become a news correspondent for CNN from the White House or the Capitol while also hosting my own political segment for the network, be an image consultant for political figures, or become a congresswoman,” she said.

The “great staff at MTSU are fully dedicated to their students’ success,” Porter added, noting that being a student “has opened so many doors for me in terms of receiving hands-on experience to help me determine the career path that is best for me.”

The Chattanooga resident said being accepted into the Scholars Academy Summer Institute of 2013 “was confirmation that MTSU was the right school for me.” Becoming a Scholars Academy peer mentor “gave me an opportunity to play a valuable role in the lives of many students who were leaving home for the first time to start a new chapter in their books called life.”

Students from all across the region, including Etowah and Athens, Tennessee, and a large contingent from Soddy-Daisy, Tennessee, attended the reception. About 40 high school counselors and community college representatives attended a luncheon earlier in the day.

MTSU takes the True Blue Tour to Johnson City Monday, Sept. 22, and Knoxville Tuesday, Sept. 23.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU junior Agnes Porter, left, of Chattanooga, Tennessee, tells high school students about university life as they arrive for the Sept. 17 True Blue Tour at the Chattanooga Convention Center. The articipants include Emily Fields, second from left, of Athens, Tennessee, and Blake Butler and John Bell of Etowah, Tennessee. All are seniors at McMinn Central High School.

MTSU Jones College hosts Sept. 30 networking, career event

The power of networking in job market success will be the topic of an upcoming annual career event hosted by the Department of Management and Marketing in the Jones College of Business.

Dave Delaney, a Nashville-based digital marketing and business networking expert, will give a presentation Tuesday (Sept. 30) at MTSU entitled “Your Network is More Important than Your Résumé.” (Photo courtesy of Dave Delaney)

Dave Delaney, a Nashville-based digital marketing and business networking expert, will give a presentation Tuesday (Sept. 30) at MTSU entitled “Your Network is More Important than Your Résumé.” (Photo courtesy of Dave Delaney)

Entitled “Digging Deeper,” this year’s event will be held from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 30, in Room S102 (State Farm Room) of the Business and Aerospace Building. It is free and open to the public.

“The purpose of ‘Digging Deeper’ is to expose students to career preparedness issues,” said Dr. Don Roy, a professor of marketing.

This year, Dave Delaney, a Nashville-based digital marketing and business networking expert, will give a presentation entitled “Your Network is More Important than Your Résumé.”

Delaney is author of the book “New Business Networking” and host of the New Business Networking Radio podcast.

New Business Networking book cover-webAmong his professional recognitions, Delaney was selected by Billboard Magazine as a digital marketing expert to follow in July 2012 and that same year was featured by the Nashville Business Journal as a Power Leader of Technology in Nashville. In 2011, Delaney was awarded the Digital Media Champion AIM Award by the American Marketing Association in Nashville.

Delaney has appeared in technology stories in USA Today, Billboard Magazine, Globe & Mail, Nashville Business Journal, The Tennessean and Mashable. Learn more about him at daveadelaney.com.

Delaney’s presentation is made possible by the University Distinguished Lecture Fund, Jones College of Business and the Department of Management and Marketing.

For more information, contact Roy at 615-904-8564 or via email at Don.Roy@mtsu.edu.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

Safely dispose of old, unwanted medications at MTSU Sept. 25

MTSU Campus Pharmacy pharmacist Tabby Ragland verifies information from prescription medications she checked during the third MTSU Prescription Drug Take Back Day April 24 outside the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

MTSU Campus Pharmacy pharmacist Tabby Ragland verifies information from prescription medications she checked during the third MTSU Prescription Drug Take Back Day April 24 outside the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

MTSU Campus Pharmacy and Campus Police are sponsoring the fourth drug take back event on the MTSU campus Thursday, Sept. 25, on campus.

Expired, unused, and unwanted prescription and over-the-counter medicines will be accepted from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at a special drive-up location near the Campus Pharmacy drive-thru on Blue Raider Drive on the east side of campus. A printable campus map can be found at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap14-15.

Pharmacy and police officials ask that participants leave medicines in their original packaging when possible, but for prescription medicines, black out any personally identifying information on the label.

Unfortunately, we are unable to accept sharps (needles) at this event, said Lisa Schrader, director of Health Promotion in the Department of Health Services.

This event is part of the Drug Enforcement Agency’s overall efforts to remove excess drugs from communities where they could be abused or misused, diverted into the wrong hands or disposed of in environmentally unsafe ways.

The National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day aims to provide a safe, secure and environmentally responsible means of disposing of prescription drugs, while also educating the general public about the potential for abuse and trafficking of medications.

This is important because the nonmedical use of controlled substance medications is at an all-time high, with 6.8 million Americans reporting having abused prescription drugs in 2012, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Survey on Drug Use and Health released in 2013.

This same study revealed more than 54 percent of people who abuse prescription pain relievers got them through friends or relatives, a statistic that includes raiding the family medicine cabinet.

Last spring, 60 pounds of medicine were collected at the MTSU collection event. In total, nearly 400 tons of medicines have been disposed of nationally since take-back collections were initiated in 2010.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Drug Take Back Flier.pub

Confucius Institute, Discovery Center host Sept. 26 cultural event

The Discovery Center’s relationship with MTSU’s Confucius Institute will be formalized Friday, Sept. 26, at a day of entertainment and enlightenment.

Chinese Culture Celebration Day will be held from 4 to 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 26, at the Discovery Center at Murfree Spring, 502 S.E. Broad St. in Murfreesboro. This event is free and open to the public.

 University Provost Brad Bartel, Discovery Center CEO Tara McDougall, Discovery Center advisory board members and top MTSU administrators will be among the dignitaries on hand for the 5:30 signing of a collaborative agreement.

“The two centers have worked together on a spring festival for the past three years,” said Dr. Guanping Zheng, Confucius Institute director. “However, the pact will enable the center and the institute to further collaborations and offer the community an opportunity to learn more about China.”

Since its inception at MTSU in 2010, the Confucius Institute has helped K-12 schools offer Chinese language programs, led students to summer camps in China and taken school administrators to China for educational collaboration and exchange.

The institute also offers noncredit Chinese language programs at beginning, intermediate and advanced levels for children and adults.

“We want to open the Confucius Institute to the community,” said Mike Novak, the institute’s assistant director. “This partnership will help in that extension. This will be a presence during school tours and for the general public.”

 MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee has established strong academic ties with China during his tenure as part of his goal to give the university’s students, faculty and staff a broader global perspective.

“We are pleased to celebrate not only the anniversary of the worldwide Confucius Institute program but our partnership with the Discovery Center,” McPhee said.

The centerpiece of the Sept. 26 celebration will be a digital cultural exploration station that features a 55-inch monitor. Patrons may touch the monitor to access interactive programs about sites of interest in China, food, music, kung fu, calligraphy, the Chinese zodiac and other topics.

“This is something I saw in my visit to China,” Novak said. “It was so engaging that I saw it in my mind at Discovery Center.”

The colorful monitor includes question-and-answer segments and video streams. Color printouts of the screen’s images will be available.

During the celebration, visitors will be able to enjoy Chinese music and dance, calligraphy demonstrations and Chinese tea tasting. There will be mini-Chinese classes at which visitors may learn some basic Chinese phrases and characters.

For more information about the Sept. 26 celebration, contact the Confucius Institute at 615-494-8696 or cimtsu@mtsu.edu. The institute’s web address is www.mtsu.edu/cimtsu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Todd Art Gallery welcomes Kennedy Center’s ‘In/finite Earth’ exhibit

MTSU’s Todd Art Gallery is playing host to a nationwide tour of unique artists with the “In/finite Earth” exhibit open now through Wednesday, Oct. 1.

The university is one of the stops on a national artists’ tour organized by VSA, the international organization on arts and disabilities founded in 1974 by Ambassador Jean Kennedy Smith and formerly known as Very Special Arts.

Click on the poster to see a larger version.

Now in its 12th year, the VSA “Emerging Artist Program” merged with the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in 2011 to expand its services.

The MTSU Arts-sponsored exhibit showcases works by 15 artists between 16 and 25 years old who are living with disabilities. VSA works to boost their emerging careers and provide the public with a chance to see these juried works of art.

MTSU arts logoMTSU’s Todd Art Gallery is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and is closed on weekends and state and university holidays. A free public reception also is set for Wednesday, Sept. 24, at the Todd Gallery from 5 to 7 p.m.

“The artists showcased in ‘In/Finite Earth’ do not allow their disabilities to handicap their lives but rather embrace their differences and employ them through to their art,” Todd Art Gallery Director Eric Snyder said of the exhibit.

“They incorporate their thoughts, feelings, character and style through their improvisations and manipulations. These aspects build matchless, creative techniques based on a wide variety of unique, aesthetic values such as symmetrical and geometrical design, curvature, contrast, values, textures and intricate details which ultimately aid in conveying a portal of communication through their works between them and their audience.”

The exhibit includes works in traditional photography, paint, pastel, ceramics and digital photography and also branches out into screen prints, archival ink jet prints, stoneware and work designed of wood, epoxy resin and fiberglass.

Participating artists include Tennessean LaAndrea Mitchell of Memphis and Chris Willcox, Kriston Poulson Gibbs, Kristi Beisecker, AJ Kiel, Dallas Looman, Kristi Neilson, Benazir Torres, Haylee Fucini-Lenkey, Sarah Langsam, Westley Cedeno, Mary Datta, Emilie Gossiaux and Madalyne Marie Hymas.

“The ‘In/finite Earth’ project is an amazing opportunity for young adults with disabilities to pursue their dreams of a career in the arts and demonstrate their outstanding talents,” said Lori Kissinger, executive director of VSA Tennessee and an organizational communications instructor at MTSU.

VSA Tennessee logo web“VSA Tennessee is extremely pleased to see this exhibit come to Tennessee, especially since one of the participants in this exhibition is from Tennessee. Middle Tennessee State University was the perfect location for the exhibit due to its location in the state and its commitment to students with disabilities. VSA Tennessee will be working closely with MTSU throughout 2014-15 due to the celebration of the 40th anniversary of VSA and the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. This exhibition is the perfect way to kick off what is going to be exceptional year of partnerships and programming.”

In addition to support from MTSU Arts, the John F. Kennedy Center, and VSA, the Volkswagen Group of America provided funding for the “In/finite Earth” exhibit. You can learn more about the exhibit here.

For more information about MTSU Arts, which presents a full slate of art, theatre and music offerings at the university each year, visit www.mtsuarts.com.

For more information, including parking and directions, contact Snyder at 615-898-5653 or eric.snyder@mtsu.edu or visit www.mtsu.edu/art. You also can find a campus parking map at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap14-15.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Denver, Colorado-based artist AJ Kiel's "Mix-Up," an acrylic painting on canvas, is part of a special national exhibit underway through Oct. 1 at MTSU's Todd Art Gallery. "In/finite Earth" is presented by VSA and the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts to showcase a program for emerging artists with disabilities.

Denver, Colorado-based artist AJ Kiel’s “Mix-Up,” an acrylic painting on canvas, is part of a special national exhibit underway through Oct. 1 at MTSU’s Todd Art Gallery. “In/finite Earth” is presented by VSA and the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts to showcase a program for emerging artists with disabilities.

Philadelphia-based artist Sarah Langsam's "Rings on Rings on Rings," created from wood, epoxy resin and fiberglass, is part of a special national exhibit underway through Oct. 1 at MTSU's Todd Art Gallery. Langsam received a first-prize award for her work in the project.

Philadelphia-based artist Sarah Langsam’s “Rings on Rings on Rings,” created from wood, epoxy resin and fiberglass, is part of a special national exhibit underway through Oct. 1 at MTSU’s Todd Art Gallery. Langsam received a first-prize award for her work in the project.

New York City-based artist Chris Willcox's "Substantia Nigra," an oil painting on canvas, mirrored acrylic sheet and wood, is part of a special national exhibit underway through Oct. 1 at MTSU's Todd Art Gallery. Willcox earned the Grand Prize for his contributions to this project.

New York City-based artist Chris Willcox’s “Substantia Nigra,” an oil painting on canvas, mirrored acrylic sheet and wood, is part of a special national exhibit underway through Oct. 1 at MTSU’s Todd Art Gallery. Willcox earned the exhibit’s Grand Prize Award.

Curiosity reigns during 18th annual MTSU math, science conference

As Caroline Lewis, center, of Murfreesboro takes notes, MTSU biology lecturer Amy Massengill utilizes "Pearl the Princess Pug" in the faculty member's "Open Up and Say Woof" presentation about veterinarian careers Saturday, Sept. 20, during the 18th Expanding Your Horizons Conference, held for the first time in the new Science Building. Lewis attends Oakland Middle School. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

As Caroline Lewis, center, of Murfreesboro takes notes, MTSU biology lecturer Amy Massengill utilizes “Pearl the Princess Pug” in the faculty member’s “Open Up and Say Woof” presentation about veterinarian careers Saturday, Sept. 20, during the 18th Expanding Your Horizons Conference, held for the first time in the new Science Building. Lewis attends Oakland Middle School. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

Lucy King was among the first to jump in and ask questions of Freneka Minter, keynote speaker for the 18th annual Expanding Your Horizons in Math and Science Conference at MTSU.

“I’m curious by nature,” said King, 13, of Franklin, Tennessee, and one of 49 Freedom Middle School students attending the conference Saturday, Sept. 20.

Curiosity reigned supreme as many of the nearly 325 middle school and high school girls posed questions to Minter, high school keynote speaker Katrina Smith and 54 leaders of workshop with cool names like “Open Up and Say Woof,” “Those Menacing Microbes,” “Concrete is Lean, Green and Mean” and 20 more for the middle school students and six for the high school students.

Lucy King

Lucy King

This marked King’s second Expanding Your Horizons, or EYH, conference. She attended as a seventh-grader in 2013, and is “into science” thanks to her father, Brad King, an implementation manager for Franklin-based Censitrac Technologies Inc.

“I’m leaning toward chemistry, genetics or computer science (as a career field),” said Lucy King, who attended the microbes morning workshop led by biology professor Mary Farone and doctoral candidates Megan Stallard and Jeannie Stubblefield.

“The classes (workshops) are awesome,” added King, who raved about the new Science Building, where her workshop was held. “I like the architecture and the roof is well-designed. Her afternoon workshops included astronomy and “Navigating Your Future,” led by John Bautch of the Department of Military Science and cadets Maggie Battan, Kelly Slocum and Sarah Thurston.

It also was a second-time appearance for Savannah Craig, 16, of Tullahoma, Tennessee, a junior at Tullahoma High School. She attended with her friend Casey York, 16, of Lynchburg, Tennessee, a sophomore at Moore County High School. After lunch, they were seen browsing through the new “I Am True Blue Blue” Admissions recruiting guide.

“There is a lot of good information, and I’ve learned a lot more about the school and more in-depth about science and math,” Craig said.

Minter, who holds undergraduate and master’s degrees from MTSU, told the girls to “Expand Your Horizons … Expand Your Opportunities” in her talk.

Deshanna McGuire, left, of Nashville watches as Mary Katherine Beshears of Franklin, Tennessee, tries to keep their marshmallow tower from falling during the "Marshmallow Tower Challenge" at the Expanding Your Horizons in Math and Science conference at MTSU Sept. 20. The workshop took place in the Science Building. McGuire, 12, is a student at Bailey Middle School. Beshears, 13, is a Freedom Middle School student.

Deshanna McGuire, left, of Nashville watches as Mary Katherine Beshears of Franklin, Tennessee, tries to keep their marshmallow tower from falling during the “Marshmallow Tower Challenge” at the Expanding Your Horizons in Math and Science conference at MTSU Sept. 20. The workshop took place in the Science Building. McGuire, 12, is a student at Bailey Middle School. Beshears, 13, is a Freedom Middle School student.

“Try something new. You have to be brave and courageous,” she said. “Sometimes you have to think outside the box and step outside your comfort zone. Take time to research and explore, and the only way to learn is to ask questions.”

Both Minter and Smith work in different areas of research at Vanderbilt in Nashville. Minter serves as program coordinator in the Center for Health Services Research at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Smith is a research assistant in the Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery.

Smith, 26 who graduated from MTSU in 2013, shared “Discovering the D.R.U.G. — Determined, Resilient, Unwavering, Girl — in You.” She is open about being a single parent with a 6-year-old daughter and having the fortitude to graduate.

Along with faculty and grad students, workshop leaders included Lisa Smith, Patty MacQueen and Carissa Discepolo of Nissan USA; alumna Bobbie Jo Meredith and Valerie Gaskin of Schneider Electric; alumna Dara L. Dixon of Vanderbilt Medical Center; Susan Lewis, Tinita Haley and Bridget Gorta of Deloitte LLP; Lisa Reaney, Lanette Phillips and Ja’Monta Smith with the Tennessee Department of Transportation Aeronautics Division; Ali Roberts and Brandi Puet of Aegis Sciences Corp.; Sarah Porterfield of HCA; Heather Zigli of Microsoft; Cheryl Johnson of Newell Rubermaid; and Jere Matty, Rachel Garrard and Ashley Colvin of Arnold Engineering Development Complex in Tullahoma.

For more information about EYH and attending the 2015 conference, contact professor Judith Iriarte-Gross at 615-904-8253, email Judith.Iriarte-Gross@mtsu.edu or visit http://mtsu.edu/wistem/eyh/index.php. Iriarte-Gross serves as the director of the MTSU Women in STEM Center, also called WISTEM.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

"I love pickles and chocolate," said 2014 Expanding Your Horizons in Math and Science Conference keynote speaker Freneka Minter, who shows a look of surprise after opening a wrapped package of pickles presented to her during the event in the McWherter Learning Resources Center Sept 20.

“I love pickles and chocolate,” said 2014 Expanding Your Horizons in Math and Science Conference keynote speaker Freneka Minter, who shows a look of surprise after opening a wrapped package of pickles presented to her during the event in the McWherter Learning Resources Center Sept 20.

Fun, food, drones capture fancy of MTSU Farm open house crowd

Karley Estes, left, paints the face of Noah Carroll, 10, of Murfreesboro, during the Sept. 18 MTSU Farm Laboratories Open House in Lascassas, Tennessee. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

Karley Estes, left, paints the face of Noah Carroll, 10, of Murfreesboro during the Sept. 18 MTSU Farm Laboratories Open House in Lascassas, Tennessee. Clark Edge, center, waits his turn. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

LASCASSAS, Tenn. — Minutes before 5 p.m. Thursday, there was a buzz about the MTSU Farm, and we’re not talking about the beehives in the apiary.

A good-size crowd — a mix of young and old — gathered, with all peering toward the sky. Several hundred yards above them, an unmanned aerial vehicle — or drone — flew in a computer-generated pattern across the nearby fields.

Its on-ground commander, Greg Barton of Tri-Green Equipment, began bringing the UAV safely to the ground as the onlookers watched in amazement.

The drone demonstration was just one facet of the annual MTSU Farm Laboratories Open House, held on the 438 acres adjacent to Guy James Road in Lascassas, Tennessee.

At their leisure, the public and MTSU communities could tour the gardens, the apiary where honey was for sale, the MTSU Dairy atop the hill and more. But most people waited in anticipation of the hamburgers and hot dogs grilled by MTSU students.

Along with the food, face painting and petting of cows by children at the dairy, the UAV flight demonstration and table displays were featured attractions at the event.

“We’re working with our aerospace department to partner with them (in research areas),” said Matthew Wade, director of the farm laboratories, also known as the MTSU Experiential Learning and Research Center.

“We’re working with the FAA to get MTSU aerospace to fly drones over the farm, which will happen soon,” Wade added. “Their students will use classroom instruction, so practical knowledge will be gained.”

MTSU School of Agribusiness and Agriscience assistant professor Song Cui, right, answers questions about unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, Murfreesboro resident Jim Tracy, second from right, and his children Carson, 9, Kenton, 7, and Ellison, 11. A drone aerial demonstration occurred during the MTSU Farm Laboratories Open House Sept. 18 at the MTSU Farm in Lascassas, Tennessee.

MTSU School of Agribusiness and Agriscience assistant professor Song Cui, right, answers questions about unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, Murfreesboro resident Jim Tracy, second from right, and his children Carson, Kenton and Ellison. A drone aerial demonstration occurred during the MTSU Farm Laboratories Open House Sept. 18 at the MTSU Farm in Lascassas, Tennessee.

Aerospace operations manager and UAV expert Doug Campbell and School of Agribusiness and Agriscience assistant professor Song Cui shared their drone knowledge with adults and children in attendance.

Barton and MTSU alumnus Tyler Hobson brought several UAVs at the invitation of senior agribusiness major Jonathan Young of Lascassas.

Murfreesboro’s Jim Tracy and his children — Kenton, 7, Carson, 9, and Ellison, 11 — asked a number of questions about drones.

“The distance was very far,” Carson Tracy said of the flying drone.

Little brother Kenton Tracey said seeing cows and petting one made his day.

McKay Carroll, 8, enjoyed watching cows being milked and discovering that MTSU makes honey.

School of Agribusiness and Agriscience Director Warren Gill told the crowd the event “is all for our students and the community. We’re still on the way. There are always improvements to be made.”

About 200 of the estimated crowd of 400 people were children.

A number of students briefly explained about the agriculture organizations they’ve joined on campus.

The MTSU chocolate milk was, as always, a hit. Making a sensation was the new MTSU chocolate ice cream, manufactured by Lebanon, Tennessee-based Two Fat Men Ice Cream Company, owned by Ed Riley.

“They are taking the same ingredients — cream and chocolate powder — we use in our chocolate milk, and he (Riley) calls it ‘MTSU chocolate,’” Wade said.

The 2015 open house will be held next September. For more information, call 615-898-2523.

Honey in all shapes and sizes will be available for sale at the 2014 MTSU Farm Laboratories Open House from 4 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18, at 3211 Guy James Road in Lascassas, Tennessee.

Honey in containers of all shapes and sizes was available at the 2014 MTSU Farm Laboratories Open House Thursday, Sept. 18, at 3211 Guy James Road in Lascassas, Tennessee.

Exhibit of McPhee’s photos from China opens Sept. 22 at Chamber

A special monthlong photo exhibit, “China: Through the Eyes of an American University President,” opens Monday, Sept. 22, at the Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce, as part of a joint MTSU and community salute to China.

With more than 300 digital images and 30 large prints in 14 different categories, the exhibit, located at 3050 Medical Center Parkway, chronicles MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee’s travels to more than 100 Chinese municipalities and provinces during his tenure at the university.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee discusses the photographs on display in the Todd Art Gallery with attendees of a Sept. 11 reception and auction there. The photos, which McPhee took while on trips to China during his presidential tenure, will be on display at the Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce Sept. 22-Oct. 22. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

And on Friday, Sept. 26, the Discovery Center at Murfree Spring and the Confucius Institute at MTSU will co-host a free evening of opportunities for children and families to explore Chinese culture and traditions.

Admission to “Confucius Institute Night,” set from 4 to 8 p.m., will be free to the public. Visitors will be able to enjoy mini-Chinese classes, dance performances and calligraphy demonstrations for “Confucius Institute Day” at the center, which is located at 502 S.E. Broad St. in Murfreesboro.

The community’s Chinese connections will be highlighted with a 55-inch video monitor that patrons can touch to access interactive programs about sites of interest in China, as well as food, music, kung fu, calligraphy, the Chinese zodiac and other topics.

McPhee said the Confucius Institute and the Discovery Center also will sign a partnership that evening to help create more joint programming and community activities.

During an exhibit and reception held earlier this month at MTSU’s Todd Art Gallery, an auction of framed copies of McPhee’s China photographs successfully raised $2,300 for a graphic design scholarship.

The Sept. 11 event at MTSU was also part of the university’s observance of the 10th anniversary of the worldwide Hanban Confucius Institute, a network of hubs for China-related cultural activities and a resource center for Chinese language, history and contemporary society.

McPhee said during the MTSU gallery event that his favorite photo in the exhibit is of a little girl with colorful barrettes.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee calls this photo of a child, taken in Suzhou, a city located just outside Shanghai in eastern China, as one of his favorites in an exhibit at the Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce Sept. 22-Oct. 22.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee calls this photo of a child, taken in Suzhou, a city outside Shanghai in eastern China, as one of his favorites from an exhibit at the Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce Sept. 22-Oct. 22.

He said he encountered the child while she was eating lunch near Shanghai, and she reminded him of his own daughter, Seneca, when she was young and her mother, Liz, decorated her hair with colorful ribbons and barrettes.

Rebecca White, a 21-year-old psychology major from Shelbyville, Tennessee, said that photo is also her favorite.

“It’s incredible that she was focused on him instead of the world around her,” White said of the photo subject. “She saw somebody that was willing to accept her culture.”

Noting that people have been his favorite photographic subjects in China, McPhee said, “You can learn so much without even asking them to say a word by the expressions on their faces.”

Ariel Tyndell, a 23-year-old graphic design major from Nashville who created the poster promoting the event, said she prefers a trio of photos titled “Detian Waterfalls in Guangxi.”

“I love the colors and the fog on the mountains,” Tyndell said. “It’s really gorgeous.”

The McPhee photo exhibit at the Chamber of Commerce headquarters will be open to the public from Sept. 22 through Wednesday, Oct. 22.

The photo exhibit expands upon McPhee’s 2012 internationally released book of photographic essays, “China: Through the Eyes of an American University President,” published by the Hanban-Confucius Institute. In 2013, China’s foreign ministry designated the book as a significant cultural presentation.

McPhee has visited the country multiple times since 1999 and has also worked closely with Chinese educational partners to strengthen MTSU’s international undergraduate and graduate student enrollment, expand its study-abroad and cultural opportunities and develop research collaboration. In 2007, China Agricultural University in Beijing named McPhee an honorary professor, its highest academic award.

MTSU has tripled its international enrollment under McPhee’s watch and this year welcomed its largest class of international scholars.

For more information about the Sept. 26 Chinese culture celebration or the Sept. 22-Oct. 22 photo exhibit, contact the Confucius Institute at 615-494-8696 or cimtsu@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue and Gina E. Fann (news@mtsu.edu)

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee gestures to the audience while describing photographs he took on his trips to China at a Sept. 11 exhibit in MTSU’s Todd Art Gallery. The subsequent photo auction and sales of his book, “China: Through the Eyes of an American University President,” raised $2,300 for a scholarship fund for graphic design majors. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

The “College Gate” outside the old city wall of Xi’an, China, shown in this photo by MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, shows a mix of traditional architecture and modern business as it welcomes guests to the “Ancient Culture Street” to enjoy arts, crafts, culture and shopping. An exhibit of McPhee’s China photographs, including this one, is set at the Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce Sept. 22-Oct. 22.

Tourists and citizens walk through the plaza surrounding China’s Beijing National Stadium, known as “the Bird’s Nest,” during the 2008 Olympics in this photo by MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee.

MTSU students ‘singing the blues’ with Sherwin-Williams Sept. 18

MTSU’s interior design majors will be giving their full range of expression to all that “true blue” means in a fun, family-friendly event set for Thursday, Sept. 18.

Click on the poster above to see a full-size version.

Click on the poster above to see a full-size version.

The MTSU student chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers, also known as ASID, will present “Singing the Blues” from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Sept. 18 at Oaklands Historic House Museum, located at 900 N. Maney Ave. in Murfreesboro.

The event, which will explore the history, symbolism, psychology and uses of the color in design, is free and open to the public.

Amanda Farris-Gilliland, lead decorative product specialist for Sherwin-Williams, will discuss decorative uses of the color blue from Renaissance art to the cultivation and manufacture of dyes.

“We’ll see how our ancestors found ‘blue’ in nature and used it in art, architecture and clothing,” Farris-Gilliland said.

The lecture will be preceded by a reception from 5 to 6:15 p.m. in Oaklands’ Maney Hall. Attendees are encouraged to wear blue clothing, and door prizes will be awarded for the best blue attire.

Farris-Gilliland, who is her company’s industry partner representative for ASID, said it is important for future designers to have mentors to make sure they have everything they need to succeed.

“We must be able to cultivate the next generation of designers and emphasize the importance of networking to them,” Farris-Gilliland said.

For more information, contact Deborah Belcher, chair of the MTSU Department of Human Sciences, at 615-898-2302 or deborah.belcher@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)