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Make reservations by March 24 for MTSU scholarship ‘Equali-TEA’

The American Association of University Women is inviting the community to raise a cup of tea in tribute to equality at a special “Equali-TEA” Tuesday, April 11, at MTSU’s Andrew Woodfin Miller Sr. Education Center.

Click on the image to reserve a place before March 24 at the Equali-TEA event.

Click on the image to reserve a place before March 24 at the Equali-TEA event.

The AAUW’s Murfreesboro chapter is celebrating the economic contributions of women in the workforce at the “Equali-TEA,” set for 4:30 p.m. April 11. The Miller Education Center is located at 503 E. Bell St. in Murfreesboro.

Reservations are required and must be made by Friday, March 24, at this website.

Hats are optional at this high tea to raise money for scholarships for MTSU women students who are returning to college to complete degrees. Attendees can make donations to the scholarship fund at the free public event.

The keynote speaker will be Rebecca Price, president and chief executive officer of the Nashville-based nonprofit organization Chick History.

Rebecca Price

Rebecca Price

MTSU first lady Elizabeth McPhee will deliver the official welcome. The organization also will present former Murfreesboro Mayor Tommy Bragg with its Tempest Award for his work to promote women’s equality during his tenure.

The 2017-2018 recipients of the Ruth Houston Memorial Undergraduate Scholarship and the Butler-Fouts Memorial Graduate Scholarship also will receive their awards at the event.

“The Ruth Houston Memorial Scholarship has provided some financial relief for my family so I can work less,” said Bethany Jackson, a prior recipient.

“It is motivating to see how AAUW lifts others up in their community, and it inspires me to do something great after I graduate.”

Eligible applicants for the Houston scholarship are nontraditional female undergraduate students, age 24 and older, who demonstrate academic promise and financial need and who have successfully completed their freshman year at MTSU.

The Butler-Fouts scholarship is available to female graduate students from underrepresented ethnic or racial groups who demonstrate academic promise and financial needs.

AAUW Mboro logo webButler-Fouts applicants must currently be enrolled in or accepted into an MTSU graduate program. Preference will be given to applicants who are close to completing their degrees.

Co-sponsors include the June Anderson Center for Women and Nontraditional Students and Timmons Properties Inc.

For more information, contact Dia Cirillo, president of AAUW-Murfreesboro, at 773-677-4238 or President@AAUW-Murfreesboro.org.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

‘MTSU On the Record’ examines Scholars Week dedication to learning

The next “MTSU On the Record” radio program will preview Scholars Week, the university’s annual tribute to academic rigor and critical thinking skills.

Nick Carr

Nick Carr

Dr. Susan Myers-Shirk

Dr. Susan Myers-Shirk

Scholars Week web bannerHost Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Susan Myers-Shirk, interim chair of the Department of History and member of the Scholars Week Committee, will air from 9:30 to 10 p.m. Tuesday, March 21, and from 6 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, March 26, on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org.

Scheduled for March 27-31, Scholars Week enables both undergraduate and graduate students to display their research at various locations around campus with one day set aside for each university college.

Nick Carr, author of “The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains,” will deliver the Scholars Week keynote address at 7 p.m. Monday, March 27, in the Student Union Ballroom, followed by a book-signing opportunity. The event is free and open to the public.

“He looks at the way the technologies of reading and writing have changed over time, and then he links that to ideas about neuroplasticity,” Myers-Shirk said of Carr. “He describes the way in which our thinking and reading changed as our tools changed.”

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

MTSU’s annual Jazz Festival expands to 3 days of ‘must-see’ concerts, clinics

MTSU’s annual Illinois Jacquet Jazz Festival has expanded to three days with three special featured artists to help the MTSU School of Music close out its 2016-17 Jazz Artist Series.

Jamey Simmons, director of MTSU’s Jazz Studies Program, said renowned saxophonist Rich Perry, the U.S. Army Jazz Ambassadors and “Jazz Master” award winner and jazz educator Jamey Aebersold will be part of concerts and special clinics featured Thursday through Saturday, March 23-25.

Jamey Aebersold

Jamey Aebersold

“This year’s festival features a unique triple bill that is a must-see for jazz students and audiences,” Simmons said.

Aebersold, who is a saxophonist, will open the festival at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, March 23, joining students for a free, public jazz improvisation clinic in Hinton Hall inside MTSU’s Wright Music Building.

“As an author, clinician, performer, publisher and owner of jazzbooks.com, Aebersold has influenced several generations of musicians with the philosophy that ‘anyone can improvise,’” said Simmons.

At 7:30 p.m. on Friday, March 24, the Jazz Ambassadors, the premier big band of the U.S. Army, will perform a free concert in Hinton Hall. Formed in 1969, the Washington, D.C.-based ensemble performs a variety of jazz styles at home and abroad.

Rich Perry

Rich Perry

And at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 25, Perry will join the MTSU Faculty Jazztet and the MTSU Jazz Ensemble 1 for the final concert of the festival as well as the final concert of this season’s MTSU Jazz Artist Series.

General admission tickets for the Jazz Artist Series concert are $10 each, and tickets are free for MTSU students, faculty and staff with a current MTSU ID. Discounts for area band students and educators are also available.

Perry also will teach a free public jazz clinic beginning at 2:10 p.m. March 25 in Hinton Music Hall.

“The (Saturday) evening concert will showcase Perry’s abilities alongside our student and faculty artists,” said Simmons. “It caps the daylong educational festival for area middle and high school jazz students.”

To reserve tickets for the March 25 Jazz Artist Series concert, call Simmons at 615-898-2724 or email James.Simmons@mtsu.edu.

School of Music new logo webThe MTSU Jazz Artist Series, which is closing out its 18th season, brings internationally renowned jazz artists to campus for performances and educational workshops.

The annual Jazz Festival, an educational event, offers junior high and high school instrumental and vocal students an individual focus on the jazz style and the art of jazz improvisation. The full schedule is available at www.mtsu.edu/music/jazzfest.php.

The MTSU School of Music renamed its annual Jazz Festival in 2016 to honor the American jazz tenor saxophonist Jean-Baptiste “Illinois” Jacquet, who died in 2004 after a storied 60-year-plus career that deeply influenced artists in jazz, rhythm and blues and rock ‘n’ roll.

The Illinois Jacquet Foundation established a new MTSU jazz scholarship in 2014. For more information, visit www.illinoisjacquetfoundation.org.

For more information about MTSU’s Jazz Artist Series, visit www.mtsu.edu/music/jazzseries.php.

For details on other MTSU School of Music performances, call 615-898-2493 or visit the “Concert Calendar” link.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

The U.S. Army Jazz Ambassadors, shown here in a formal photo, will perform Friday, March 24, in a free concert at MTSU as part of the annual Illinois Jacquet Jazz Festival. The event also features concerts on March 23 and 25 as well as classes and clinics for jazz musicians. (Photo submitted)

The U.S. Army Jazz Ambassadors, shown here in a formal photo, will perform Friday, March 24, in a free concert at MTSU as part of the annual Illinois Jacquet Jazz Festival. The event also features concerts on March 23 and 25 as well as classes and clinics for jazz musicians. (Photo submitted)

Governor pushes jobs at state Veteran Education Academy at MTSU

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam not only loves veterans who served their country, but he wants them in Tennessee’s workforce.

Haslam said jobs were the primary reason he attended the second Statewide Veteran Education Academy, hosted Wednesday, March 8, at Middle Tennessee State University.

Keith M. Huber, center, MTSU senior advisor for veterans and leadership initiatives, discusses the importance of the Daniels Center Veterans Transitioning Home during a tour of the center at the March 8 Veteran Education Academy hosted by MTSU. (MTSU photos by Andy Heidt)

Keith M. Huber, center, MTSU senior advisor for veterans and leadership initiatives, discusses the importance of the Daniels Center Veterans Transitioning Home during a tour of the center at the March 8 Veteran Education Academy hosted by MTSU. (MTSU photos by Andy Heidt)

Haslam, Department of Veterans Services Commissioner Many-Bears Grinder and others addressed more than 100 representatives from more than 40 higher education campuses, discussing topics that included mental health, data collection and the Tennessee STRONG ACT, which gives eligible National Guard members tuition to earn first-time bachelor’s degrees.

“We’re competing with states and countries all over the world for the right workforce,” said Haslam. “Veterans are a competitive advantage for us. One of the things we are trying to do is have a veterans’ task force to help ease the transition for veterans as they come back into public life. Education is a key piece of that.”

The governor said student veterans “enrich the campuses across the state with their life experiences, leadership, wisdom, commitment and determination to persevere. This population is a critical piece of our Drive to 55 initiative to increase the number of Tennesseans with a postsecondary degree or credential to 55 percent by 2025.”

In introducing Haslam, interim Provost Mark Byrnes noted that MTSU is:

  • excited about “the plan to offer free college access to adults through the Tennessee Reconnect program.”
  • ready to “transition a new wave of community college graduates toward four-year degrees.”
  • thankful for the recent grant allocated by the governor through the Tennessee Higher Education Commission to create the new Veterans Transitioning Home Office, the first major expansion of the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center.

Haslam established the Veterans Education Task Force in November 2013.

In addition to touring the Daniels Center, attendees heard presentations from representatives of the Student Veterans of America, the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Tennessee Board of Regents and Tennessee Army National Guard.

Keith M. Huber, MTSU senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives, told the group the MTSU “approach to life is one of being a student of life. We learn by the people we have the privilege to interact with every day.”

Huber, who obtained the THEC grant for the Veterans Transitioning Home Office, also is a retired lieutenant general who served nearly 40 years in the U.S. Army.

Grinder said the task force’s efforts and regional meetings have “helped strengthen the campus network through a shared commitment to student veteran success through improved data collection, information sharing and practices to address transitional challenges.”

MTSU Division of Information Technology systems analyst Janae Peterson received the state’s first Transformation Award for developing the most comprehensive data collection program now being shared across Tennessee.

“You are a star,” Grinder said of Peterson, who traveled to each of Tennessee’s three grand divisions to share her work. “I want to see where this is going to take us.”

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam tells the crowd of more than 100 people that jobs will be a major focus for veterans transitioning to the workforce after graduating from state colleges and universities March 8 in the Student Union Ballroom on the MTSU campus.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam tells the crowd of more than 100 people that jobs will be a major focus for veterans transitioning to the workforce after graduating from state colleges and universities March 8 in the Student Union Ballroom on the MTSU campus.

Dr. Hilary Miller, director of the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center, visits with attendees at the March 8 Statewide Veteran Education Academy at MTSU in the Student Union Ballroom.

Dr. Hilary Miller, director of the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center, visits with attendees at the March 8 Statewide Veteran Education Academy at MTSU in the Student Union Ballroom.

MTSU systems analyst Janae Peterson, third from right, holds the inaugural Transformation Award presented to her March 8 by the Tennessee Department of Veterans Services. Also pictured are, from left, Lisa Rogers, MTSU information technology associate vice president; Bruce Petryshak, IT vice president; Teana Harle of the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center; Daniels Center Director Hilary Miller; Commissioner Many-Bears Grinder of the Tennessee Department of Veterans Services; and Keith M. Huber, MTSU senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives.

MTSU systems analyst Janae Peterson, third from right, holds the inaugural Transformation Award presented to her March 8 by the Tennessee Department of Veterans Services. Also pictured are, from left, Lisa Rogers, MTSU information technology associate vice president; Bruce Petryshak, IT vice president; Teana Harle of the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center; Daniels Center Director Hilary Miller; Commissioner Many-Bears Grinder of the Tennessee Department of Veterans Services; and Keith M. Huber, MTSU senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives.

Commissioner Many-Bears Grinder of the Tennessee Department of Veterans Services speaks during the 2017 Veterans Education Academy March 8 at MTSU.

Commissioner Many-Bears Grinder of the Tennessee Department of Veterans Services speaks during the 2017 Veterans Education Academy March 8 at MTSU.

MTSU students, faculty are on spring break March 6-11, return March 13

Middle Tennessee State University students and faculty will be on spring break March 6-11.

MTSU offices and departments will be open regular hours during the break.

Twice-a-day campus tours that begin in the Student Services and Admissions Center (MT One Stop) will begin at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. March 6-10 while students and faculty enjoy spring break. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Twice-a-day campus tours that begin in the Student Services and Admissions Center (MT One Stop) will start at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. March 6-10 while students and faculty enjoy spring break. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Classes will resume Monday, March 13.

During the break, some buildings and MT Dining food venues will be open during the week and both weekends, including:

  • James E. Walker Library — open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, March 4; open from 2 to 10 p.m. Sunday, March 5; open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. March 6-10; closed Saturday, March 11; open from 1 p.m. Sunday, March 12, to 2 a.m. Monday, March 13.
  • Student Union — closed March 4-5; open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday, March 6; open from 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 7; open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, March 8-10; open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 11; open from 4 to 10 p.m. March 12.
  • Campus Recreation Center — Closed March 4-5; open from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. March 6-10; closed March 11-12
  • Student Health Services and Campus Pharmacy in the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center open 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 6-10. Note: The pharmacy closes from noon to 1 p.m. for lunch and drive-thru is open until 4:30 p.m.
  • MT One Stop in Student Services and Admissions Center — open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. March 6-10. Daily campus tours will start at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more on the guided campus tours, visit www.mtsu.edu/schedule-a-visit/daily-campus-visits.php or call 615-898-5670.
  • MT Dining — A number of food venues are closed or have limited hours. To find openings and closings, visit http://mtsu.campusdish.com and click on “Locations.” Clicking on the individual locations will bring up spring break hours of operation.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

 

Young geniuses learn collaboration at 25th annual Invention Convention

They spent the last few months brainstorming, collaborating and implementing their ideas, so the 630-plus young Midstate inventors were ready to burst when they crammed into MTSU’s Student Union Thursday, Feb. 23, for the 25th annual Invention Convention.

“They are thoroughly enjoying this day. They look forward to it every year,” said Diane Vantrease, the “learning leader” at Coles Ferry Elementary School in Lebanon, Tennessee, as several excited students scurried past, relieved that their inventions had passed the judges’ inspections and ready to check out other students’ ideas around the room.

“By Christmas break, they have to at least have the name of their invention and the general idea, and when we come back to school the first of January, we jump headfirst in and are working every class period until this past week.”

Young inventors, parents, teachers and supporters crowd into MTSU’s Student Union ballroom to await the judges at the 2017 Invention Convention Thursday, Feb. 23. The event, now in its 25th year, welcomed 637 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders from 49 schools across the Midstate with their 340 gadgets, contraptions and devices designed as games or to “make life easier.” (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

Young inventors, parents, teachers and supporters crowd into MTSU’s Student Union ballroom to await the judges at the 2017 Invention Convention Thursday, Feb. 23. The event, now in its 25th year, welcomed 637 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders from 49 schools across the Midstate with their 340 gadgets, contraptions and devices designed as games or to “make life easier.” (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

Asked to invent games and items to “make life easier,” the fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders responded with more than 320 unique gadgets, contraptions and devices for this year’s event. Elementary education professor Tracey Huddleston established MTSU’s Invention Convention in 1993 in tribute to her mother, True Radcliff, a longtime fifth-grade teacher who conducted “Invention Convention”-type events at her school.

The Invention Convention participants are public- and private-school students in Coffee, Davidson, DeKalb, Franklin, Grundy, Rutherford, Sumner, Warren, Wilson and Williamson counties. More than 110 received ribbons or trophies for their 2017 creations, and several of those winners are headed next to the national Invention Convention set for June in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Tracey Huddleston

Dr. Tracey Huddleston

By comparison, Huddleston recalled, the inaugural Invention Convention in 1993 at MTSU welcomed 56 young inventors and their 42 inventions to the James Union Building, enjoying plenty of presentation space in a cordoned-off half of the cavernous Tennessee Room.

You can see a list of the 2017 MTSU Invention Convention winners here. This year’s convention program, which includes the names of all the young inventors, is here. State Farm Insurance is the longtime local sponsor of MTSU’s annual Invention Convention.

Each Invention Convention also features a guest speaker who focuses on encouraging the youngsters to embrace their creativity and their imaginations to solve problems. Guests over the years have included astronauts, artists, athletes, musicians, scientists, historians and more; the 2017 guests were a trio of musicians — Victoria and Stephen Carey and Ian Christian — who explained the importance of collaboration when bringing inventions alive. The three cited examples of songs that need help from many people to reach an audience.

“The avenues of a song are very different, but they all come together in one way or another, whether you’re writing it and recording it and producing it or performing it on tour or hearing it on the radio,” Stephen Carey explained after the trio danced and sang with the youngsters to the strains of Taylor Swift’s “Shake It Up,” George Strait’s “Check Yes or No” and their own wedding song, “Forever All Mine.”

MTSU Invention Convention guest speakers Victoria Carey, left, Ian Christian and Stephen Carey sing, dance and laugh while playing a snippet of Taylor Swift’s “Shake It Off” for the young inventors Thursday, Feb. 23, inside MTSU’s Student Union ballroom to demonstrate how collaborating on ideas can improve them. The trio are musicians and friends, and Victoria Carey also is a graduate student in MTSU’s College of Education. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

MTSU Invention Convention guest speakers Victoria Carey, left, Ian Christian and Stephen Carey sing, dance and laugh while playing a snippet of Taylor Swift’s “Shake It Off” for the young inventors Thursday, Feb. 23, inside MTSU’s Student Union ballroom to demonstrate how collaborating on ideas can improve them. The trio are musicians and friends, and Victoria Carey also is a graduate student in MTSU’s College of Education. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

“It’s very exciting how these inventions, these songs that you create with other people, become all these different things. It’s an exciting process from the beginning to wherever they end up, just like your inventions.”

The convention also showcases an everyday object and explains its history as an invention, such as a tape measure, golf ball, USB charger, Frisbee, dice and pair of sunglasses; this year conventioneers learned about headphones, invented in 1910 to help naval radio operators hear better, and received a tiny pair of customized “Invention Convention 2017” earbuds to take home.

Like inventor Nathaniel Baldwin working at his kitchen table on that first pair of headphones, Huddleston urged each of the conventioneers to continue inventing.

“Remember: You’ve created something today that wasn’t here before. Regardless of who walks away with a special award, all of you are walking away with an invention, and I want you to keep inventing,” she said as the students, teachers and parents celebrated.

“Come back here next year, and the next year. I want you to believe in yourself. That’s part of the collaboration — if we didn’t have other people to believe in us, where would we be? Keep inventing, keep thinking, keep problem-solving. There are tons of problems that need to be solved.”

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU Invention Convention judges Will Clouse, center left, and Terry Goodin, right, listen carefully as a Coles Ferry Elementary School student explains her group’s invention inside MTSU’s Student Union ballroom Thursday, Feb. 23. Clouse and Goodin are also professors in the Department of Elementary and Special Education in MTSU’s College of Education. The event, now in its 25th year, welcomed 637 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders from 49 schools across the Midstate with their 340 gadgets, contraptions and devices designed as games or to “make life easier.” (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU Invention Convention judges Will Clouse, center left, and Terry Goodin, right, listen carefully as a Coles Ferry Elementary School student explains her group’s invention inside MTSU’s Student Union ballroom Thursday, Feb. 23. Clouse and Goodin are also professors in the Department of Elementary and Special Education in MTSU’s College of Education. The Invention Convention, now in its 25th year, welcomed 637 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders from 49 schools across the Midstate with their 340 gadgets, contraptions and devices designed as games or to “make life easier.” (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU Invention Convention judge Marrie Lasater, center, points out an interesting portion of “World War Fun,” a game by Northfield Elementary fifth-graders Haylee Campbell, left, and Jacob Wells inside MTSU’s Student Union ballroom Thursday, Feb. 23. Not pictured is co-inventor Lucian Begley. Lasater is a member of the graduate faculty in the Department of Elementary and Special Education in MTSU’s College of Education. The Invention Convention, now in its 25th year, welcomed 637 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders from 49 schools across the Midstate with their 340 gadgets, contraptions and devices designed as games or to “make life easier.” (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU Invention Convention judge Marrie Lasater, center, points out an interesting portion of “World War Fun,” a game by Northfield Elementary fifth-graders Haylee Campbell, left, and Jacob Wells inside MTSU’s Student Union ballroom Thursday, Feb. 23. Not pictured is co-inventor Lucian Begley. Lasater is a member of the graduate faculty in the Department of Elementary and Special Education in MTSU’s College of Education. The Invention Convention, now in its 25th year, welcomed 637 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders from 49 schools across the Midstate with their 340 gadgets, contraptions and devices designed as games or to “make life easier.” (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

Indigenous Peoples Powwow returns to MTSU Feb. 24-26 with pageantry

For the first time in almost a decade, MTSU will host a three-day powwow as a tribute to indigenous peoples.

The Native American Student Association will present the Indigenous Peoples Powwow Feb. 24-26 at the Tennessee Livestock Center, 1720 Greenland Drive in Murfreesboro. A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Native American dancers will engage in a Chicken Dance in a tribute to Jackie Ross, shown here, a veteran performer of Native American dances, at the Indigenous Peoples Powwow. The event, hosted by MTSU’s Native American Student Association, is scheduled for Feb. 24-26 at the Tennessee Livestock Center in Murfreesboro. (Submitted photo)

Native American dancers will engage in a Chicken Dance in a tribute to Jackie Ross, shown here, a veteran performer of Native American dances, at the Indigenous Peoples Powwow. The event, hosted by MTSU’s Native American Student Association, is scheduled for Feb. 24-26 at the Tennessee Livestock Center in Murfreesboro. (Submitted photo)

Arts and crafts, dancing, music, storytelling and vendors selling authentic handmade Native American items will be part of the celebration, which will begin at 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24, with a fry bread cook-off.

At 5 p.m., representatives of various tribes will participate in a forum about issues facing Native Americans today.

“We’re talking about the successes native people have had in their communities and the struggles they face as they look for a successful route to addressing them,” said Melissa Shelby, the event’s primary organizer and a graduate student majoring in biochemistry.

Social dances and a hand drum competition will round out Friday’s activities at the livestock center. Renowned blues artist Butch Mudbone of the Seneca tribe will perform at an after-hours event at 9 p.m. Friday at Jazzmatazz, 1824 Old Fort Parkway in Murfreesboro.

The agenda for Saturday, Feb. 25, will start at 9 a.m. as vendors offer their silverwork, drums, flutes, hides, beadwork, woodcarvings, pottery and basketry for sale.

Storyteller Jamie Oxendine, Native American liaison for Ohio University, will share true stories of the Woodland tribes at the Indigenous Peoples Powwow. The event, hosted by MTSU’s Native American Student Association, is scheduled for Feb. 24-26 at the Tennessee Livestock Center in Murfreesboro. (Submitted photo)

Storyteller Jamie Oxendine, Native American liaison for Ohio University, will share true stories of the Woodland tribes at the Indigenous Peoples Powwow.  (Submitted photo)

Niles Aseret, a Navajo born and reared on an Arizona reservation, will speak at 11:15 a.m. Saturday on his campaign for a National Native Code Talker Day to pay tribute to the individuals who used their knowledge of Native American languages to transmit messages for the Allied forces during World War II.

Throughout the powwow, various dancers will display their talents in competitions. On display will be social dances and special dances including the Hoop Dance, the Chicken Dance and a special dance honoring those who walked the infamous Trail of Tears, the forcible removal of Native Americans from their ancestral homelands between 1830 and 1850.

“I watched many of these youth who were dancing at 6 years and 12 years, and now these people are bringing their 2-year-olds and their 6-year-olds to this powwow,” said Shelby.

General admission for Friday’s activities is $4. Admission to Butch Mudbone’s performance at Jazzmatazz is $8.

Admission for Saturday and Sunday is $7 general admission, $5 for MTSU students and employees and seniors. Active-duty and retired military personnel, emergency medical technicians, firefighters and police officers, as well as children under 6 years of age, will be admitted free of charge. 

For more information, contact Shelby at mds2e@mtmail.mtsu.edu. To make a financial contribution, go to https://www.gofundme.com/mtsu-indigenous-peoples-powwow.

— Gina Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU concludes Keyboard Artist Series Feb. 27 with free Endahl concert

Pianist, composer and MTSU faculty member Matt Endahl will jazz up the final notes of MTSU’s 2016-17 Keyboard Artist Series Monday, Feb. 27, with a free public concert in the university’s Wright Music Building.

The award-winning Nashville musician will perform at 8 p.m. Feb. 27 in the Wright Building’s Hinton Music Hall. A searchable campus map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Matt Endahl

Matt Endahl

Endahl’s concert set list will feature works by jazz greats Bud Powell, Thelonious Monk, Duke Ellington, W.C. Handy and more, including Ellington’s classic “I Let A Song Go Out Of My Heart” and Handy’s “St. Louis Blues.”

One of Nashville’s most in-demand pianists, Endahl has performed in groups led by Jeff Coffin, Rahsaan Barber, Duffy Jackson, Christina Watson, Marcus Finnie, Dara Tucker and many others. He also has shared the stage with legendary jazz figures like Arthur Blythe, Jimmy Heath, Jane Ira Bloom, Dave Liebman and the late Marcus Belgrave.

School of Music new logo webEndahl studied piano at the University of Michigan, where he earned his master’s degree in improvisation in 2012. In 2008 he was a Bösendorfer Montreux Jazz Solo Piano Competition semi-finalist, and from 2008 to 2013, he was a member of the music faculty at Hillsdale College. He has presented performances, compositions and research at numerous international music association meetings and performed at Jazzanooga, the Detroit International Jazz Festival and the avant-garde music festival Edgefest in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

From 2010 to 2013, Engdahl hosted jazz and experimental music radio programs on WCBN-FM Ann Arbor, interviewing music legends Henry Grimes, Mayo Thompson, and Larry Austin. Since 2008 he has managed Sound Mansion Recordings, an outlet for his experimental music, and he also operates “A Shot in the Dark,” a blog devoted to his jazz and improvised music research.

Along with his classes at MTSU, Endahl teaches at Belmont University and the Nashville Jazz Workshop and maintains a private teaching studio.

For more information on the Keyboard Artist Series at MTSU, visit www.mtsu.edu/music/keyboardseries.php. For details on more MTSU School of Music events, call 615-898-2493 or visit the “Concert Calendar” link.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU goes red for Feb. 28 interior design event at Oaklands Mansion

An MTSU-sponsored event at Murfreesboro’s historic Oaklands Mansion is combining history, February’s color scheme and a popular ongoing exhibit into a special lecture.

new-MTSU-ASID-logo-web“Red: The Heart of the Wedding” is slated for 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 28, at Oaklands Mansion, located at 900 N. Maney Ave. Oaklands Mansion and the MTSU student chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers host it.

MTSU alumna Amanda Farris, a Nashville, Tennessee-based designer account executive with Sherwin-Williams Paints, will deliver a presentation, “Seeing Red,” on the history and use of the color red in interiors.

After her talk, attendees will be able to enjoy Oaklands’ “Wedding Dresses Through the Decades” exhibit, which is underway through Sunday, March 5.

Amanda Farris

Amanda Farris

The array of more than 50 gowns from the 19th through the 21st centuries include country music star Barbara Mandrell’s 1967 wedding gown and attire from the 25th anniversary renewal of her vows with her husband, Ken Dudney.

Oaklands Mansion logo webThe exhibit is sponsored in part by MTSU’s Department of Human Sciences.

Refreshments will be available, and door prizes have been donated by local businesses.

Tickets for the entire event are $20 for the general public and can be prepurchased in the museum gift shop or by calling Oaklands at 615-893-0022. Seating is limited and reservations are requested.

For more information, visit www.oaklandsmuseum.org or email Mary Beth Nevills, education director of Oaklands, at mb@oaklandsmuseum.org.

To learn more about MTSU’s Textiles, Merchandising and Design Program in the Department of Human Sciences, contact chair Deborah Belcher at 615-898-2302 or deborah.belcher@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

VSA Tennessee’s Young Soloist Competition set for Feb. 22 at MTSU

VSA Tennessee is excited to introduce six young individuals competing in vocal and instrumental music at its Feb. 22 Young Soloist Competition at MTSU.

The annual event will last from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22, in the Hinton Music Hall of the Wright Music Building on MTSU’s campus. Tickets are $5 at the door, and those age 13 and younger will be admitted free.

Competitors are vying to represent the state of Tennessee in the International Young Soloist Competition at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts later this year.VSA national logo web

The musicians performing at MTSU are part of VSA Tennessee, the state organization on arts and disability that was established in 2001 on the MTSU campus. Students in MTSU professor Lori Kissinger’s Organizational Communication in Communities EXL Class are once again handling logistics for this year’s event.

The statewide event is open to any vocalist or instrumentalist under the age of 25 with any form of disability. In addition, bands and musical groups can apply as long as one of the members of the group has a disability, according to the vsatn.org website. The state contest is part of an international competition, which will be held May 25 at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., and will feature winners from across the nation.

Lori Kissinger

Lori Kissinger

Laura Dodd

Laura Dodd

JP Williams, country music artist

JP Williams

Sen. Jim Tracy

Sen. Jim Tracy

Hosts for the state contest include state Sen. Jim Tracy as well as VSA’s International Young Soloist 2003 and 2004 winner, Laura Dodd, who will perform a song. Dodd has shared stages with some of country music’s best, including George Jones, Travis Tritt, Rascal Flatts, Patty Loveless, Bruce Hornsby, Josh Turner and Ben Vereen.

The Young Soloist event will also feature Nashville singer/songwriter JP Williams as a special guest for the night. Williams has built his solo artist resume, including openers for Charlie Daniels, Ricky Skaggs, Randy Travis and Jo Dee Messina, as well as a headliner spot for a college tour singing his original tunes for students throughout the northeastern U.S.

The 2016-17 Tennessee VSA Young Soloist program is sponsored by U.S. Rep. Diane and Dr. David Black and the First Tennessee Foundation as well as fundraising efforts of the Kissinger’s fall 2016 and spring 2017 ORCO 3250 classes.

For more information about VSA Tennessee, visit www.vsatn.org or contact Kissinger at userk7706@comcast.net or 615-210-8819.

— Jessica Allen, jlh2gd@mtmail.mtsu.edu

VSA Tennessee will choose the top performers from among the six young individuals competing in vocal and instrumental music at its Feb. 22 Young Soloist Competition at MTSU. (Submitted photo)

VSA Tennessee will choose the top performers from among the six young individuals competing in vocal and instrumental music at its Feb. 22 Young Soloist Competition at MTSU. (Submitted photo)

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