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Get your tickets for May 3 ‘True Blue Night’ with Nashville Sounds

Nashville Sounds Wordmark

The Nashville Sounds will celebrate Middle Tennessee State University on Tuesday, May 3, with its second annual True Blue Night at First Tennessee Park.

MTSU’s men’s basketball coach Kermit Davis and MTSU’s women’s basketball coach Rick Insell will throw out the two ceremonial first pitches immediately before the Sounds play the Iowa Cubs at 6:30 p.m.

The Sounds are offering MTSU students, faculty, alumni and supporters special discounted tickets with designated seating for the game. You can buy tickets for $8 a seat here through Monday, May 2, by using the promotional code “TRUEBLUE” when prompted.

Kermit Davis

Kermit Davis

Rick Insell

Rick Insell

“We thank the Nashville Sounds for providing this great opportunity for the MTSU community to celebrate our True Blue pride in coaches Insell and Davis – and see some baseball in a terrific park,” said MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee.

Davis and Insell will sign special posters at the game commemorating their Conference USA championship seasons. MTSU also will provide giveaways, and Lightning, the university’s mascot, will be on the field between innings.

The nationally recognized student group “Maybe April,” which includes MTSU’s Katy Bishop and Kristen Castro and their bandmate Alaina Stacy, will sing the National Anthem. The group was recently featured in Billboard Magazine as one of the industry’s “emerging female country trios.”

Get your tickets now!

Nashville Sounds mascot Booster, left, and MTSU's Lightning pause a moment for a photo before the July 1 "True Blue Night" at First Tennessee Park in downtown Nashville. (MTSU photo)

Nashville Sounds mascot Booster, left, and MTSU’s Lightning pause for a photo before 2015 “True Blue Night” at First Tennessee Park in downtown Nashville. (MTSU file photo)


 

http://youtu.be/G585pNHLm_4

 

Fashion, networking tips available at women’s expo April 30 at MTSU

Fun, food and fashion await young women eager for the latest strategies to propel them to success at “The Couture Experience Women in Business Showcase” Saturday, April 30, at MTSU.

Couture Experience 2016 poster webThe free public showcase is scheduled for 9 a.m. to noon April 30 in MTSU’s Sam Ingram Building, located at 2269 Middle Tennessee Blvd.

Parking is available in the Ingram lot, but attendees are advised to expect traffic delays due to road construction. A printable campus map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

The event is part of MTSU’s celebration of National Women’s History Month.

Sholanda Brown

Sholanda Brown

“It’s kind of like a seminar/fashion show/showcase of business owners where participants are able to, toward the end of the event, walk around and see what the different vendors have to offer,” said Sholanda Brown, one of the coordinators of the program and a benefits analyst in the MTSU Office of Human Resources.

Brown, who also is the owner of The Couture Experience by Shalon, joined forces with Latoya Bennett, owner of the Ellie Colour wardrobe stylist firm, and Meichelle Gibson, co-owner of Gibson Consulting and Entertainment Group, to provide a networking and information exposition for prospective businesswomen and those working in their first five years of the business world.

Bennett will explain how to make appropriate fashion transitions for all occasions without abandoning a sense of style. Gibson will discuss how to take a business to the next level and turn obstacles into opportunities.

Brown said all vendors will be local providers of products and services who operate in the city of Murfreesboro.

“We’re going to have them come up to the stage and talk about their businesses and how the businesses can have an impact on the community,” said Brown.

Along with Brown, Bennett and Gibson’s company, the June Anderson Center for Women and Nontraditional Students and the MTSU National Women’s History Month Committee are co-sponsors of the “Women in Business Showcase.”

For more information, contact Barbara Scales, director of MTSU’s June Anderson Center for Women and Nontraditional Students, at 615-898-2193 or barbara.scales@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU lets the dogs out for a great cause at ‘See Spot Run’ 5K event May 1

Canines and their humans are welcome to participate in the 11th annual “See Spot Run” 5K Run/Walk, which begins at 8 a.m. Sunday, May 1, at MTSU’s Peck Hall.

Click on the image to register for the 2016 "See Spot Run" 5K Run/Walk, set Saturday, May 1, at MTSU.

Click on the image to register for the 2016 “See Spot Run” 5K Run/Walk, set Saturday, May 1, at MTSU.

Proceeds from the event will support the MTSU Blitz Build and Rutherford County Habitat for Humanity. MTSU’s Office of Student Organizations and Service and the Sigma Pi fraternity are sponsoring the event.

A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap. A map of the race route is available online here.

Racers may register at www.active.com or by mailing in a printable registration form, found here, with payment.

The entry fee is $30 before Monday, April 25, and $35 after that date. All participants will receive a dry-fit style shirt, and age-group winners will receive awards.

Discounts are available for groups of 15 or more at a rate of $25 per person for racers who register by 4:30 p.m. Monday, April 25, in Room 330 of the MTSU Student Union.

Each participant who brings a dog also must bring the dog’s rabies tag number. Retractable leashes are prohibited.

Gold’s Gym Tennessee and H3O Aquatics are co-sponsors of this event. For more information, contact the Office of Student Organizations and Service at 615-898-5812 or go towww.mtsu.edu/sos.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Runners and their dogs take to the road in the 2015 "See Spot Run" 5K Run/Walk at MTSU. (Photo courtesy of MTSU See Spot Run)

Runners and their dogs take to the road in the 2015 “See Spot Run” 5K Run/Walk at MTSU. (Photo courtesy of MTSU See Spot Run)cause

MTSU brings ‘West Side Story’ to life in Tucker Theatre

Shakespeare first cut them out in little stars, and a quartet of American theater geniuses modernized the young lovers’ story into a musical that lit up Broadway nearly four centuries later.

Click on the poster for ticket information.

Click on the poster for ticket information.

Now MTSU Theatre students want audiences to feel the hope and heartache of Maria, Tony and their friends in a full-scale MTSU Arts production of the Broadway classic “West Side Story” that runs through Sunday, April 24, in Tucker Theatre.

“This show is special for us because of where America is right now,” says senior Sadie Katie Hampton, a Knoxville, Tennessee, resident and stage manager for the musical. “We’re doing our best, with all of the craziness going on in the world today, to show a story.

MTSU Arts logo“We’ve done big shows here, but this is grand and it’s very serious and real and relevant. Every rehearsal I walk into, I’m immersed in this new world.”

Tickets for Wednesday night sold out, but seats remain for Thursday-Saturday, April 21-23, nights at 7:30 and for the 2 p.m. matinee Sunday, April 24.

Tickets are available here. General admission tickets are $15 each and $10 for K-12 students; MTSU students, faculty and staff with valid IDs will be admitted free.

The 1957 musical updated “Romeo and Juliet,” won two Tony Awards and a Grammy and is regularly revived on Broadway. The 1961 film version of “West Side Story” won 10 Academy Awards. Its songs by Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim — “Somewhere,” “America,” “Tonight,” “I Feel Pretty” — are classics, as is its iconic Jerome Robbins choreography of the battling, finger-snapping Jets and Sharks.

But with film-version lyrics like “Life is all right in America/If you’re all white in America” and blunt depictions of racism, immigration, gang violence, futile deaths and authority figures passing the buck in both the stage and film musicals, the MTSU cast agrees that “West Side Story” is, unfortunately, just as timely almost 60 years later.

“While this show has a lot of spectacle to it, a lot of fun numbers, a lot of interesting and amazing things to see, I hope people will walk away from it and realize that there is a lot of hurt and pain in this world,” explains Knoxville freshman theatre major Brianna Smart, the show’s bright-eyed female lead, Maria. “We as human beings cause it to each other for the most ridiculous reasons.

Knoxville freshman Brianna Smart, left, and Murfreesboro junior Collin Peterson rehearse a scene from “West Side Story” outside MTSU’s Tucker Theatre. The pair portray Maria and Tony, respectively, in the MTSU Theatre production, which runs April 20-24. Tickets are available at http://www.mtsuarts.com. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

Knoxville freshman Brianna Smart, left, and Murfreesboro junior Collin Peterson rehearse a scene from “West Side Story” outside MTSU’s Tucker Theatre. The pair portray Maria and Tony, respectively, in the MTSU Theatre production, which runs April 20-24. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

“If we can have 10 people walk away each night thinking, ‘Hey, this story had a message,’ then I think we’ve done a good job. … We as a cast are particularly focusing on the story and the importance of understanding where everyone has come from, and the battles they’ve faced, and not facing one another with prejudice but with love and respect.”

The MTSU production features a full orchestra and 38-member cast plus a crew that brings the total involved to nearly 80 people.

It’s the Department of Theatre and Dance’s largest musical production since the record-setting four-night run of “Les Misérables” in fall 2013 and is being led by the same pair: director Kristi Shamburger, a theatre professor, and musical director Raphael Bundage, a professor of vocal performance in MTSU’s School of Music.

Professor Kristi Shamburger

Professor Kristi Shamburger

The department’s dance program is playing a role in “West Side Story,” too, with choreography help from assistant professor Marsha Barsky. A complete cast list is available here.

“We’ve not really run into any unexpected challenges as there are always elements to overcome in every production,” Shamburger said, “but we are learning to navigate our set; the show is quite physical with a considerable amount of stage combat, dance and climbing!

“We have a fantastic cast that has been such a joy to work with too. They are always ready to ‘rev us off,’ as the script says. I hope audiences will join us on this worthwhile journey, because it’s full of excitement, fun and emotion.”

Murfreesboro junior Collin Peterson, a vocal performance and music education major who’s already sung and acted on local stages as well as at Hinton Hall and Tucker Theatre, says he soon realized, in rehearsing as Tony, something key about the show.

“There’s a big message toward the end [where] I’m speaking to ‘Doc,’ and I say, ‘Even if it only lasts from one night to the next, it’s worth the world.’

“That’s the love that Tony and Maria get to share for that small amount of time,” he explains, “and I think that’s important to remember, for all of us.”

For more information about the show, visit www.mtsuarts.com or call 615-494-8810.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Pianist Park closes inaugural Keyboard Artist Series April 20

International award-winning pianist Esther Park will help MTSU’s School of Music conclude its inaugural Keyboard Artist Series season Wednesday, April 20, with a free performance in the university’s Wright Music Building.

Park’s 8 p.m. public concert will be conducted inside the Wright Building’s Hinton Music Hall. A searchable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Dr. Esther Park

Dr. Esther Park

Park, winner of both the 2013 Jose Roca and Russian International Piano Competitions, among many such contests, has performed as a soloist with orchestras and in recitals across the United States, Europe and Asia.

She took her first piano lessons at age 4 and earned undergraduate and graduate degrees from The Juilliard School, as well as a Master of Musical Arts degree from the Yale School of Music. Park currently is an assistant professor of piano at East Tennessee State University and the director of ETSU’s Pre-College Program.

School of Music new logo web“Dr. Park’s recital will be a great finale to our inaugural season of the MTSU Keyboard Artist Series,” said Dr. Arunesh Nadgir, coordinator of keyboard studies at MTSU.

The recital, titled “Le France,” will feature the works of Baroque-era composer Jean-Philippe Rameau and Impressionist Claude Debussy, both Frenchmen, in the first half and pieces influenced by French culture and composers in the second.

Park will perform movements from Rameau’s circa-1726 “Nouvelles Suites de Pieces de Clavecin” and Debussy’s early 1900s “Images,” followed by “French Suite in G Major” by Johann Sebastian Bach, “Twelve Variations on ‘Ah, vous dirai-je, Maman’” by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and Franz Liszt’s concert transcription from Charles Gounod’s opera “Faust.”

Dr. Arunesh Nadgir

Dr. Arunesh Nadgir

Nadgir explained that despite almost 200 years separating the Rameau and Debussy works, “the two composers strongly connected through the French keyboard tradition. The listener will certainly hear similarities between these works.

“The second half offers wonderful music from the Baroque, Classical and Romantic periods. The audience will certainly appreciate the elegance of the Bach, the lightness and innocence of the Mozart and, finally, the virtuosic fireworks of the Liszt,” he continued.

For more information on the new Keyboard Artist Series at MTSU, which features MTSU faculty and distinguished guest artists from around the world, visit www.mtsu.edu/music/keyboardseries.php.

For details on more MTSU School of Music concerts, call 615-898-2493 or visit the MTSU School of Music “Concert Calendar” link.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Leadership values strike True Blue chord with MTSU students

Industry leaders and an MTSU faculty member brought their wit, wisdom and knowledge to the table during the annual Omicron Delta Kappa True Blue Leadership Day.

The daylong event, held April 15 in the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building, brings noted professionals from a variety of professions to share their leadership experiences with MTSU students and faculty.

ODK logo croppedThe ODK True Blue Leadership Day highlights the core values of the “True Blue Pledge” by educating participants about multiple aspects of leadership.

Guest speakers included:

  • Tara MacDougall, CEO of the Discovery Center at Murfree Spring.
  • Ryan Hirsch, operations manager of the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy’s Center for the Public Trust.
  • D.J. Smith, marketing director with Just Love Coffee, and Kevin Baugherle, director of sales for Gigi’s Cupcakes.
  • Dr. Jeremy Sather, assistant professor of Japanese in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures.
  • Bob King, founder and CEO of Cavalry Logistics LLC.

Senior Nausheen Qureshi, who will graduate in May with a degree in nutrition and food science, said she felt MacDougall “gave a very detailed, strategic way to reach the leadership plan we all strive to achieve.”

“I liked how she gave practical tips of what to do with networking, examples of organizations to join and an idea of what’s happening in the community,” Qureshi added.

Sophomore biochemistry major Akmal Ishmetov and junior business management major Jordan Welborn were part of the group listening to Smith and Baugherle, whose companies are co-branding.

Ishmetov, who is from Moscow, Russia, learned a great deal — “how to do everything, have a goal, pursue it, don’t stop and learn how to take failure and move on,” he said.

Welborn, who is from Murfreesboro, requested and received business cards from both men.

“I’m just exploring a lot of different of options and making as many connections as I can,” she said. “I really enjoyed their stories, background and what they do with adoption.”

Just Love Coffee founder Rob Webb and his wife, Emily, adopted two daughters from Ethiopia. He felt led to support other adoptive families, which led to Just Love Coffee Roasters. To date, more than $500,000 has been provided to adoptive families, mission-minded groups and nonprofits trying to make a positive impact on the world.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Tara MacDougall, CEO of the Discovery Center at Murfree Spring, addresses the audience April 15 during the annual Omicron Delta Kappa True Blue Leadership Day in the amphitheater of the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Tara MacDougall, CEO of the Discovery Center at Murfree Spring, addresses the audience April 15 during the annual Omicron Delta Kappa True Blue Leadership Day in the amphitheater of the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Kevin Baugherle, left, sales manager for Gigi's Cupcakes, discusses the growth of the business. He and D.J. Smith, marketing director for Just Love Coffee, shared a segment together during the April 15 ODK True Blue Leadership Day in the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building amphitheater. (MTSU photo by Marsha Powers)

Kevin Baugherle, left, sales manager for Gigi’s Cupcakes, discusses the growth of the business. He and D.J. Smith, marketing director for Just Love Coffee, shared a segment together during the April 15 ODK True Blue Leadership Day in the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building amphitheater. (MTSU photo by Marsha Powers)

Discovery Center at Murfree Spring CEO Tara MacDougall addresses the audience April 15 during the annual Omicron Delta Kappa True Blue Leadership Day in the amphitheater of the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Discovery Center at Murfree Spring CEO Tara MacDougall discusses strategic goals to accomplish April 15 during the annual Omicron Delta Kappa True Blue Leadership Day in the amphitheater of the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Agritourism class offers glimpse of farm life for children [+VIDEO]

Children have a blast when they visit a farm — or, in this case, the assortment of agriculture-related stations manned by MTSU students and volunteers for the third Agricultural Education Spring Fling Tuesday, April 12, in the Tennessee Livestock Center.

More than 750 Rutherford County elementary school children and nearly 1,000 people altogether participated in the MTSU agritourism class-led field trip.

https://youtu.be/_FGaP6ShjGQ

Children in seven area schools’ elementary and kindergarten classes discovered life on the farm as professor Alanna Vaught and her 20-student class, joined by about 100 MTSU students and other volunteers, made farm life fun and interesting for the youngsters. Most of the young visitors live in the city.

Ethan Adams, 5, of Blackman Elementary School, described the field trip as “awesome.”

MTSU students Wes Plunkett, left, and Katie Bell answer questions Rutherford County school children have regarding horses April 12 during the third Agricultural Education Spring Fling in the Tennessee Livestock Center.

MTSU students Wes Plunkett, left, and Katie Bell answer questions about horses from young Rutherford County students April 12 during the third Agricultural Education Spring Fling in the Tennessee Livestock Center. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

What did Adams think was most fun about the two hours his class spent in the livestock center?

“Everything,” he said, adding that the MTSU farm- and dairy-produced chocolate milk he got to drink also was — you guessed it — “awesome.”

“The animals were cute,” he continued, referring to a horse, miniature horse, dairy cow, sheep and chickens in the main arena. “I liked every single animal.”

Junior agribusiness major Austin Brennstuhl of Eagleville, Tennessee, said the agritourism class project was an “opportunity to help kids understand about agriculture and teach them about the needs of people.”

The annual event has become very popular, said Vaught, who had to turn away many teachers’ and schools’ requests to participate because the excellent volunteer support she receives can only handle a single-day event right now.

“This close to the end of the semester, our students can’t miss classes,” she said, adding that her agritourism class and 35 students worked eight hours at the Adventures in Agriculture Day April 9 at Lane Agri-Park in Murfreesboro.

“One hundred students from one department is a pretty big deal,” Vaught said of the School of Agribusiness and Agriscience student support for the spring fling. “They take ownership of it.”

In addition to Blackman, other schools attending this year included La Vergne Lake, Cedar Grove Elementary, Middle Tennessee Christian School, Thurman Francis Elementary, Christiana Elementary and Campus School.

A $1,300 University College public service grant led in sponsorship, which included TriGreen Equipment, Rutherford Farmers Cooperative, Rutherford County Farm Bureau, Rutherford County Soil Conservation District and Cumberland Tractor & Equipment LLC, among others.

To learn more about the Ag Education Spring Fling and opportunities to attend in 2017, call 615-898-2523.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU freshman agribusiness major Rachel Elrod of Eagleville, Tennessee, tells Rutherford County Schools’ children how bees bring honey at one of the agriculture-related stops they had April 12 during the Agricultural Education Spring Fling in the Tennessee Livestock Center. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

MTSU freshman agribusiness major Rachel Elrod of Eagleville, Tennessee, tells youngsters from the Rutherford County Schools how bees bring honey at one of the agriculture-related stops at the April 12 Agricultural Education Spring Fling in the Tennessee Livestock Center.

The Rutherford Farmers Co-Op’s Adrianna Lamb, left, holds the children’s attention as she talks about tractors and other farm equipment at the third MTSU Agricultural Education Spring Fling April 12 in the Tennessee Livestock Center. MTSU student Jessica Hicks provides assistance at this station.

Rutherford Farmers Co-Op guest Adrianna Lamb, left, holds the children’s attention as she talks about tractors and other farm equipment at the third MTSU Agricultural Education Spring Fling with help from MTSU student Jessica Hicks.

MTSU fashion promotion students showcase African couture April 16

MTSU students who major in textiles, merchandising and design will strut their stuff in an end-of-semester extravaganza.

The program’s annual Fashion Runway Show is scheduled for 5 p.m. Saturday, April 16, in Room 221 of the McWherter Learning Resources Center. A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Click on the image for more information.

Click on the image for more information.

The theme is African couture with male and female fashions running the gamut of numerous royal, tribal and contemporary styles, showing how people all over the continent dress.

Dr. Rick Cottle

Dr. Rick Cottle

With the oversight of Dr. Rick Cottle, an assistant professor who teaches a fashion promotion class, 20 students take charge of every aspect of preparation, including stage and production, modeling, promotion, merchandise and finance.

“The class participates in the division of labor themselves from the very beginning when there’s not organization,” Cottle said.

Top designs will receive scholarship prizes of $750 for first place, $500 for second place and $250 for third place.

In addition, seniors will create special five-garment collections and submit them to a separate panel of judges. The winner will receive design time from Omega Apparel of Nashville to take an original garment through from concept to production.

Senior Michelle Cooper of Brentwood, Tennessee, said she is using denim and interlock knit for her creations, and she’s doing her own dyeing.

“It’s been challenging, but I’ve made it,” said Cooper. “It’s been interesting, too. I found my aesthetic a couple of years ago and I’ve stuck with that.”

Jacob Burton, a senior from La Vergne, Tennessee, is the student charged with “taking a step back and seeing what the consumer is going to get,” as he described it.

“It’s been a good learning experience in how the show goes down behind the scenes,” Burton said. “Thirteen weeks is not long enough to put on a whole show.”

Senior Alexandria Booker from Chapel Hill, Tennessee, is in charge of the stage appearance, lighting, audio, soundtracks and programs. She said there is no way the work for this show can be limited to the classroom.

“Mainly, in this class, we discuss various things, and, then, outside of class, we make our contacts,” Booker said.

General admission tickets are $25. Student tickets are $10. VIP tickets, which include access to a pre-show reception hosted by the runway show’s advisory board, are $50.

To purchase tickets, contact Cottle at 615-494-8752 or rick.cottle@mtsu.edu. For more information, go to www.facebook.com/mtrunwayshow16.

— Gina Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Schizophrenia in spotlight as MTSU hosts psychology conference

One of the nation’s foremost experts on schizophrenia will share his expertise at the Middle Tennessee Psychological Association Spring 2016 Meeting at MTSU.

Thomas R. Kwapil, a professor of psychology at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, will deliver the keynote address at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 23, in the State Farm Lecture Hall of the Business and Aerospace Building. A printable campus map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Dr. Thomas R. Kwapil

Dr. Thomas R. Kwapil

Kwapil’s expertise includes the developmental vulnerability for schizophrenia, which is called schizotypy. This is a theory that schizophrenia has a continuum that ranges from socially manageable and even useful behavior, such as that found in some very creative people, to psychologically destructive behavior.

“People who are schizotypal see more patterns,” said William Langston, an MTSU psychology professor and coordinator of the gathering. “So it’s associated with paranormal belief because you might find coincidences and meaning in things that other people wouldn’t, whereas, in full-blown schizophrenia, you might see so many patterns that … you’re trapped in patterns.”

Students from throughout the region will present their academic papers and posters and receive educational and career advice from psychology professors at the gathering, which is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. Langston says psychology as a major provides excellent preparation for the workforce.

“Employers like our majors because, in psychology, we don’t have black-and-white answers,” Langston said. “We have a lot of ambiguity, and so, as students major in it, they get tolerance for ambiguity, which is an important skill in real life.”

Kwapil’s address is free and open to the public, but the registration fee to attend the entire conference is $5 for students and community members and $15 for faculty and other psychology professionals. Online registration is available at http://tinyurl.com/guz9893. The advance registration deadline is Friday, April 15.

High school students may attend for free, but they must register. In addition to admission to the conference, the registration fee includes breakfast for the day of the conference and membership in the Middle Tennessee Psychological Association.

For more information, contact Langston at 615- 898-5489 or william.langston@mtsu.edu.

— Gina Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU observes Equal Pay Day with discussion, negotiation tips April 12

The emphasis is on closing the gender equity gap as MTSU observes Equal Pay Day.

The College of Graduate Studies and the Murfreesboro chapter of the American Association of University Women will sponsor Equal Pay Day activities Tuesday, April 12, in Room 101 of the Ingram Building, 2269 Middle Tennessee Blvd. in Murfreesboro.AAUW Mboro logo web

April 12, 2016, represents the date until which the average American woman must work into 2016 just to catch up with an average man’s entire earnings for 2015, according to the National Committee on Pay Equity.

“Speak Up! Talking about and Closing the Pay Gap” is a discussion of the issue slated for 10 a.m. in Ingram 101. AAUW officials will share tips on how to talk to friends and elected officials about pay equity. They also will discuss how voter registration plays a role in closing the pay gap. This event is free and open to the public.

Both undergraduate and graduate students are encouraged to attend “StartSmart: Salary Negotiation for Students” at 4 p.m. in Ingram 101. This AAUW workshop is designed to provide college students and young professional women with the knowledge and skills required to negotiate their salaries.

According to the latest statistics from the U.S. Department of Labor, women working full time in the United States make only 79 cents on the dollar compared to men. The gap is even greater for women of color.

The American Community Project, an ongoing statistical survey by the U.S. Census Bureau, finds that close to 70 percent of all women in Tennessee work. Two out of 3 families include a wife in the labor force, and 50 percent of female-headed households are led by a working woman.

For more information, contact Dia Cirillo, public policy chair for AAUW Tennessee, at 773-677-4238 or AAUWMurfreesboro@gmail.com.

— Gina Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)