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Jazz Artist Series continues Feb. 18 with Wayne Shorter tribute

The MTSU Faculty Jazztet will pay tribute to renowned saxophonist Wayne Shorter Thursday, Feb. 18, in the latest concert in the 2015-16 MTSU Jazz Artist Series.

Tickets for the 7:30 p.m. Feb. 18 concert in Hinton Music Hall inside the university’s Wright Music Building are $10 for the public.

Jazz saxophonist and composer Wayne Shorterp pauses for a 2014 publicity photo. (Photo courtesy of Robert Ascroft)

Jazz saxophonist and composer Wayne Shorterp pauses for a 2014 publicity photo. (Photo courtesy of Robert Ascroft)

Admission is free for MTSU students, faculty and staff with a valid ID. Discounts for area music students and educators also are available.

Shorter, 82, whom The New York Times called “probably jazz’s greatest living small-group composer, and a contender for greatest living improviser,” has been performing and composing since the late 1950s.

The MTSU Faculty Jazztet will feature professor Jamey Simmons and Dr. Michael Parkinson, director of the School of Music on trumpet; professor Don Aliquo and alumnus David Williford on saxophone; professor Joe Davidian on piano; adjunct professor Derrek Phillips on drums; and graduate student Patrick Atwater on bass.

“From his beginnings in the hard bop years of Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers to his groundbreaking recordings for the Blue Note record label and his work with Miles Davis and the electric fusion group Weather Report, Shorter’s music is always rewarding to perform on multiple levels,” said Simmons, who serves as coordinator of the Jazz Studies Program in MTSU’s School of Music.

Jazz Artist 2015-16 graphic web“What’s amazing is that he continues to tour with a quartet and makes music at such a high level. It’s this energy that we as a faculty are very excited about bringing to the stage.”

Advance tickets may be reserved by calling 615-898-2724 or emailing Simmons at james.simmons@mtsu.edu. Tickets also can be purchased at the door.

Now in its 17th season, the MTSU Jazz Artist Series brings internationally renowned jazz artists to campus for performances and educational workshops. Past guest artists have included some of the most important musicians and educators in jazz history.

School of Music new logo webThe 2015-16 Jazz Artist Series concludes Saturday, March 19, with a 7:30 p.m. visit from saxophonist Steve Wilson as part of the daylong MTSU Illinois Jacquet Jazz Festival.

For more information about MTSU’s Jazz Artist Series, visit www.mtsu.edu/music/jazzseries.php. For details on more MTSU School of Music performances, please visit www.mtsumusic.com or call 615-898-2493.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Forrest Hall task force to host second forum Feb. 24 off campus

MTSU’s Forrest Hall task force will host an off-campus open forum later this month to get more feedback about whether to change the name of the building that houses the university’s ROTC program.

Task force chairman Derek Frisby, who heads the 17-member panel of students, faculty, alumni and community members, said the second public forum will be from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 24, at the Lane Agri-Park, 315 John R. Rice Blvd. in Murfreesboro.

Dr. Derek Frisby

Dr. Derek Frisby

Frisby, a Civil War historian and faculty member in the Global Studies and Cultural Geography department, said it was important for the task force to host an off-campus forum to get feedback from the wider community. The first forum was held Dec. 1 at the university’s Student Union Building.

The university announced in June 2015 that it would engage the community on the name of the campus building that houses MTSU’s Army Reserve Officer Training Corps program and is named after Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee asked the panel to recommend by April whether the building should be renamed; retain the name but with added historical perspective; or recommend that no action or change is warranted. The Tennessee Board of Regents would have to approve any recommended name change and the university is also researching whether other state authorities would have to give approval as well.

Task force meetings are open to the public. For more information about the task force, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/forresthall.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

Built in 1954, Forrest Hall houses MTSU's Army ROTC program. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

Built in 1954, Forrest Hall houses MTSU’s Army ROTC program. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

Get tickets now for Feb. 18 MTSU Unity Luncheon honoring public servants

Nine Tennesseans whose lives have centered on service to others will be celebrated Thursday, Feb. 18, at MTSU’s annual Unity Luncheon as part of the university’s observance of Black History Month.

The Honorable Camille R. McMullen

Judge Camille R. McMullen

Judge Camille R. McMullen of the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals will be the featured speaker at the luncheon, which is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Feb. 18 in the Student Union Ballroom.

The deadline to purchase tickets is Thursday, Feb. 11. Tickets are $25 and are available at www.mtsu.edu/aahm.

McMullen was appointed by Gov. Phil Bredesen to fill a vacancy on the Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals in June 2008. She was elected to that position in August 2008 and is the first African-American woman to serve on an intermediate court in Tennessee.

McMullen was an assistant district attorney for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Tennessee from 2001 to 2008 and assistant district attorney for the Shelby County District Attorney General’s Office from 1997 to 2001.

An MTSU tradition since 1996, the Unity Luncheon celebrates unsung community heroes age 60 or older who have lived in the Middle Tennessee area for 25 years or more and who have made outstanding contributions to their society in education, community service, black arts, sports or as advocates of civility.

This year’s honorees are:

  • Ray Fite, a delegate to district association ministries and state convention who also performs many other duties for Cherry Grove Missionary Baptist Church in Murfreesboro.
  • Marva Hudspeth, a retired alcohol and drug treatment counselor and volunteer at Mt. Pleasant Middle School’s Kindle Club and Mt. Pleasant Historical Museum in Mt. Pleasant, Tennessee.
  • Jo Anne Gaunt, financial secretary of Berry Chapel AME Church in Lynchburg, Tennessee, and recipient of the Distinguished Toastmaster Certificate from Toastmasters International.
  • Joe Herbert, Rutherford County educator and administrator for more than 40 years and an advocate for educational equity.
  • The Rev. Robert D. James, pastor of St. John United Methodist Church in Murfreesboro, former assistant principal at Murfreesboro’s Riverdale High School and three-time NFL Pro Bowler as a Buffalo Bills defensive back from 1969 to 1974.
  • The Rev. H. Bruce Maxwell, pastor of Lake Providence Missionary Baptist Church in Nashville for 40 years and Board of Trustees member of Belmont University in Nashville.
  • Russell D. Merriweather, a volunteer for AARP in the Nashville area and 2010 recipient of Tennessee’s AARP Andrus Award for Community Service.
  • Albert Nelson, minister of Sand Hill Church of Christ in La Vergne, Tennessee, a member of Friends of Bradley Academy and a mentor to fifth- and sixth-grade boys through a Delta Sigma Theta program.
  • Florine Ratliff, an MTSU alumna and teacher for 30 years at Mitchell-Neilson Elementary School in Murfreesboro.

A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap. Guests may park in the Rutherford Boulevard parking lot, and shuttle service to the Student Union will be provided.

For more information, contact Daniel Green, director of Intercultural and Diversity Affairs and chair of the MTSU Black History Month Committee, at 615-898-5812 or daniel.green@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Black History Month 2016 illus

Click on the illustration for a link to MTSU’s complete 2016 Black History Month event calendar.

MTSU hosts successful National Quilts of Valor Sew Day event

A group of area quilters, including MTSU students, gathered at the university Saturday, Feb. 6, to do their part to add a bit of comfort to active military personnel and veterans.

For National Quilts of Valor Sew Day, university employee Janice Lewis, a quilter herself, spearheaded a drive to bring 20 to 30 people to campus to complete roughly 20 quilt tops.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, right, holds up one of the quilts assembled Saturday on campus as part of National Quilts of Valor Sew Day. At left is Ginger Fondren of the Quilts of Valor Foundation. (MTSU photo by Andrew Oppmann)

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, right, holds up one of the quilts assembled Saturday on campus as part of National Quilts of Valor Sew Day. At left is Ginger Fondren of the Quilts of Valor Foundation. (MTSU photos by Andrew Oppmann)

The event was held at MTSU’s Learning Resource Center. Also attending the event was MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee and retired Lt. Gen. Keith Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives.

The mission of the Quilts of Valor Foundation is to cover service members and veterans touched by war with comforting and healing quilts as a small show of gratitude for their valor and sacrifice.

Janice Lewis

Janice Lewis

“Since I already knew about Quilts of Valor and have made a quilt for them in the past, I thought it was a great idea when Quilts of Valor Foundation representative Ginger Fondren mentioned it to me at the Veterans and Military Family Center grand opening in November,” said Lewis, coordinator for academic affairs in the Office of the Provost, prior to the event.

“She was the person who presented quilts at the opening, including one to the general (Huber). I knew we had the space needed for this kind of project in our Human Sciences department. That started the ball rolling, and it looks like it will be a fun event.”

Lewis and staff and faculty in the Department of Human Sciences reached out to students to sew or volunteer their help, too, as part of the university’s experiential learning program.

The Office of the University Provost, Department of Human Sciences and MTSU Veterans and Military Family Center are sponsoring the project.

For more information, contact Lewis at 615-898-2881 or email Janice.Lewis@mtsu.edu.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Retired U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Keith Huber, MTSU's senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives, speaks to volunteers Saturday, Feb. 6, at the opening session of National Quits of Valor Sew Day on the university campus. (MTSU photo by Andrew Oppmann)

Retired U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Keith Huber, MTSU’s senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives, speaks to volunteers Saturday, Feb. 6, at the opening session of National Quits of Valor Sew Day on the university campus.

Volunteers work machines Saturday, Feb. 6, in MTSU's Learning Resource Center during National Quilts of Valor Sew Day. (MTSU photo by Andrew Oppmann)

Volunteers work machines Saturday, Feb. 6, in MTSU’s Learning Resource Center during National Quilts of Valor Sew Day.

One of the example quilts displayed Saturday, Feb. 6, at MTSU's Learning Resource Center during National Quilts of Valor Sew Day. (MTSU photo by Andrew Oppmann)

One of the example quilts displayed Saturday, Feb. 6, at MTSU’s Learning Resource Center during National Quilts of Valor Sew Day.

MTSU’s inaugural Hack-MT is an instant success [+VIDEO]

The college students may have been quite exhausted late Sunday morning, Jan. 31, after working most of the preceding 36-plus hours trying to create apps, games, gadgets and more at the first MTSU Hack-MT.

But when Amy Henderson, director of organizational development for event sponsor LeanKit, asked the large gathering if they wanted to return next year and do it all again, they let out a resounding whoop — much to her delight, as well as that of Dr. Chrisila Pettey, chair of MTSU’s Department of Computer Science.

“Next year,” however, may instead become “this fall,” if the second Hack-MT event takes place in late September or early October as tentatively discussed.

The inaugural event drew more than 200 software developers, visual designers, programmers and computer science students from local universities, and about 300 people, total to the MTSU Science Building for the Jan. 29-31 opening ceremonies, dinner and VIP reception and weekend-long opportunity to invent new Web platforms, mobile apps and electronic devices.

https://youtu.be/7ngq-l8L3B0

Students from Belmont, Vanderbilt, Lipscomb, Fisk and other area colleges joined peers from MTSU for Hack-MT.

“This was pretty cool,” Pettey said while helping clean up from three days of students and industry mentors spinning their collective wheels for their computer creations.

Among the creative accomplishments were a travel app and MTSU tutoring and food service apps.

Vanderbilt University doctorial candidate Kate Brady, left, explains to Katie St. Francis of Hendersonville, Tenn., about the "Translation Practice" project she was involved with during the first Hack-MT Jan. 31 in the MTSU Science Building. Brady, who is from Durham, N.C., received a Chrome Book from Dell Computers as a door prize when awards were announced. St. Francis is product manager for LeanKit, the event's title sponsor. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

Vanderbilt University doctoral candidate Kate Brady, left, tells Katie St. Francis of Hendersonville, Tennessee, about the “Translation Practice” project Brady worked with during the inaugural Hack-MT Jan. 31 in the MTSU Science Building. Brady, who is from Durham, North Carolina, received a Chrome Book from Dell Computers as a door prize. St. Francis is product manager for LeanKit, the event’s title sponsor. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

The food service app, nicknamed “Hey, Waiter!” will provide users with estimated wait times for meals at MT Dining/Aramark venues on campus.

“It was an extremely successful project. We have a mostly finished product,” said Rookery Brauch, a junior computer science major from Murfreesboro. “We hope to add it to the MT Mobile App with a little more polishing.”

MTSU-based Star Jam team members earned the Gold Motherboard Award. The My Myo team, comprising students from MTSU and other schools, earned the silver for creating a sensor for a gesture-control armband. UT-Knoxville students, whose team name was “Mooch,” captured the judges’ bronze award.

“This absolutely exceeds any expectations I had,” said Henderson. “To see the energy level, the number of students who stayed, and the sponsors’ involvement, it was a positive event and great for the computer science community.”

Randy Davis, a senior from Franklin, Tennessee, whose computer science major includes a business application, said students received “a crash course for the last 36 hours, working with information and data.”

“It was an amazing opportunity to watch young people who understand technology and create apps that will move us forward in the future,” said Dr. Bud Fischer, dean of MTSU’s College of Basic and Applied Sciences.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU Hack-MT participating students share the results of their projects with judges and others attending the three-day, 36-hour event in the Science Building.

MTSU Hack-MT participants share the results of their projects with judges and others attending the three-day, 36-hour event in the Science Building.

A team collaborating on its project Jan. 29 uses a wipe board in the MTSU Science Building to their advantage. (Submitted photo)

A team collaborating on its project Jan. 29 uses a wipe board in the MTSU Science Building to their advantage.

Members of the Hack-MT Gold Motherboard Award-winning team "Star Jam" are shown with the plaque they received during awards' presentations at the conclusion of the first-time event Jan. 31 in the MTSU Science Building. Team members included Mitch Hauge, Steven Sheffey, Stephen Kinser, Milan Zanussi, Luke Stanley, Michael Murphy, Deeksha Adiani, Zach Yarid and David Chen.

Members of the Hack-MT Gold Motherboard Award-winning team “Star Jam” are shown with the plaque they received during awards’ presentations at the conclusion of the first-time event Jan. 31 in the MTSU Science Building. Team members include Mitch Hauge, Steven Sheffey, Stephen Kinser, Milan Zanussi, Luke Stanley, Michael Murphy, Deeksha Adiani, Zach Yarid and David Chen.

Historic wedding gowns dress up spring for MTSU, Oaklands Mansion

Fashion, fabric and one of the most fantastic days in a couple’s life are captured in the “Wedding Dresses through the Decades” exhibit currently underway at Oaklands Mansion in Murfreesboro.

The exhibit, a fifth-year partnership between MTSU’s Department of Human Sciences and the historic site, continues through Sunday, March 6, at the mansion, located at 900 N. Maney Ave.

“We are building a tradition that links generations,” said Deborah Belcher, chair of the human sciences department. “The historic details and family stories are exquisite, heartwarming and engaging.”

Elegant gowns with billowing trains are part of the 2016 “Wedding Dresses through the Decades” exhibit, a partnership event from MTSU’s Department of Human Sciences and Oaklands Mansion in Murfreesboro. The exhibit will be open from Jan. 10 through March 6 at the mansion, located at 900 N. Maney Ave. in Murfreesboro. (Photo submitted)

Elegant gowns with billowing trains are part of the 2016 “Wedding Dresses through the Decades” exhibit, a partnership event from MTSU’s Department of Human Sciences and Oaklands Mansion in Murfreesboro. The exhibit is open through March 6 at the mansion, located at 900 N. Maney Ave. in Murfreesboro. (Photo submitted)

A broad diversity of styles in the exhibit represents the changing tastes of American society.

“The Textiles, Merchandising and Design program at MTSU maintains a 750-plus piece collection of historic garments, and we’ll have four of our wedding gowns on display,” said Dr. Teresa King, a professor in the human sciences department.

Those four gowns are from 1860, 1891, 1900 and 1912. The overall display includes wedding dresses from 1947 to the present, including the 2008 gown of WSMV-TV anchor/reporter Demetria Kalodimos, an original design by Rosie Woodruff of Textile Fabrics in Nashville.

“The TXMD program also offers a course entitled ‘History of Fashion,’ which introduces students to the study of garments and accessories throughout history,” said King.

“Students will have the opportunity to visit the Oaklands wedding gown exhibit and see history unfold as told from a bridal history perspective.”

King said students from the “Fashion Illustration” course have visited previous exhibits and sketched original renditions of wedding gowns from various periods.

“Both experiences allow students to apply the knowledge gained from these TXMD courses,” King said.

Items from the MTSU collection also are on display in windows in the Learning Resources Center and the Ellington Human Sciences Building on campus. These garments will include two dresses from the 1970s and a man’s suit and a woman’s suit from the 1940s.

The Oaklands Mansion exhibit will be open during regular hours, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1-4 p.m. Sundays.

For information on private after-hours viewings, group tour rates and special evening openings, contact Mary Beth Nevills, the mansion’s educational director, at 615-893-0022 or mb@oaklandsmuseum.org.

To learn more about MTSU’s Textiles, Merchandising and Design Program, contact King at teresa.king@mtsu.edu or Belcher at deborah.belcher@mtsu.edu.

CHP’s West will discuss career of piecing together history Jan. 21

Tennessee State Historian Dr. Carroll Van West, director of MTSU’s Center for Historic Preservation, will discuss his long career in investigating and preserving historic sites across the country Thursday, Jan. 21, as the special guest of the Rutherford County Archaeological Society.

Dr. Carroll Van West

Dr. Carroll Van West

The free public discussion, “Confessions of a Fieldwork Junkie,” will begin at 6:30 p.m. Jan. 21 at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro, located just off the Public Square at 225 W. College St.

West has served as director at the Center for Historic Preservation at MTSU and the Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area since 2002.

A history department faculty member since 1985, West teaches courses in architectural history, historic preservation, and state and local history and received the MTSU Foundation’s Career Achievement Award, considered the pinnacle of recognition for the university’s finest professors, last August.

RCAS logo webGov. Bill Haslam named West as state historian, a four-year appointment, in 2013.

West also serves as co-chair of the Tennessee Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission and as a Tennessee representative on the National Board of Advisors of National Trust for Historic Preservation.

At his Jan. 21 talk, West will discuss his decades of fieldwork on sites across the Southeast and in eastern Montana, where he focuses on 19th- and 20th-century history as well as architecture and material culture. You can see some of the results of his work at http://tennesseehistoriclandscape.com and http://montanahistoriclandscape.com.

The Rutherford County Archaeological Society meets monthly at the Heritage Center and welcomes guest speakers, the community and professional archaeologists to discuss the county’s past and how to document and learn from it.

For more information on the Rutherford County Archaeological Society, visit http://facebook.com/groups/RCAS.TN or contact Laura Bartel at lbanthro@gmail.com.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

‘It’s all about love, not hate’ — MLK event at MTSU draws hundreds

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”

— Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

MTSU students gathered on the Keathley University Center knoll Monday night, Jan. 18, for a candlelight vigil as part of the Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration on campus. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

MTSU students gather on the Keathley University Center knoll Jan. 18 for a candlelight vigil during the Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration on campus. (MTSU photos by Andy Heidt)

The oft-cited quote from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. resonated with hundreds of MTSU students and others gathered inside Keathley University Theater Monday, Jan. 18, to pay tribute to the legacy of the slain civil rights activist and his late wife, Coretta Scott King.

“Show love. It’s all about love, not hate,” said Melina Datta, a sophomore public relations major from Memphis. “You can’t overcome the obstacles without love.”

MLK vigil button webPresented by the Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity and the MTSU Office of Intercultural and Diversity Affairs, the celebration and candlelight vigil in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day drew a diverse crowd of hundreds of students — including many representatives from student organizations — as well as some faculty and staff.

Daniel Green, the new director of the Office of Intercultural and Diversity Affairs, told the crowd that the night’s celebration honored a man “who brought hope and healing to America.”

An assassin’s bullet struck down the Baptist minister and leader of the civil rights movement April 4, 1968, while he was in Memphis, Tennessee, in support of a sanitation workers’ strike.

King’s actual birthday was Jan. 15, 1929. In 1983, President Ronald Reagan signed into law a bill to create an official federal holiday honoring King, and in 1992, President George H.W. Bush declared that the holiday would be observed on the third Monday in January each year.

The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. addresses a crowd from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial where he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech during the Aug. 28, 1963, march on Washington, D.C. MTSU students and others will celebrate King's memory during a Jan. 18 candlelight vigil at 6 p.m. in the Keathley University Theater. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Department of Defense Archives)

The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. addresses a crowd from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial where he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech during the Aug. 28, 1963, march on Washington, D.C. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Department of Defense Archives)

“On this day we commemorate the values that he taught us, the values that he left behind for us to embrace,” Green said, “values of trust, courage, hope and compassion that defined his character and embodied what Dr. King stood for.

“… We have to remember that we’re all on the same boat. If one part of that boat goes down, then all of it goes down.”

Bishop Chris Johnson, founder of Zion Christian Ministries in Murfreesboro, gave the keynote address at the Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration and candlelight video held Monday, Jan. 18, at Keathley University Center at MTSU. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Bishop Chris Johnson, founder of Zion Christian Ministries in Murfreesboro, gives the keynote address at the Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration and candlelight vigil held Jan. 18 at MTSU’s Keathley University Center.

Kicking off the event was an a cappella performance of “Glory, Glory Hallelujah” by the MTSU Generation of Praise Gospel Choir.

Other performances included a musical tribute by saxophonist Don Aliquo, an MTSU professor of jazz studies; a musical/multimedia tribute to Coretta Scott King by MTSU music education major David Wyatt; a spoken word tribute by MTSU psychology major Trevor Johnson; and an MLK multimedia presentation, followed by a candlelight vigil on the KUC knoll coordinated by the Kappa Xi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc.

In giving the keynote address, Bishop Chris Johnson, founder of Zion Christian Ministries in Murfreesboro, sprinkled heavy doses of scripture with his message highlighting three key components of King’s philosophy: love, unity and hope.

“Part of his legacy, if lived out, would be you and I walking out that love and demonstrating that love across our cities, across our communities and across this campus, the kind of love that allows us to sit and eat with someone that doesn’t look like us,” Johnson said.

“It is that kind of love that allows us to talk to someone that we wouldn’t normally talk to.”

Brian Marshall, historian for the local Omicron Sigma Lambda chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha, noted that King was a member of the organization and that fellow members often refer to him as “brother.”

“Those same things that our organization believes and stands for are the exact same things that Martin Luther King stood for,” he said. “He loved our dear fraternity. When he went marching from Selma to Montgomery, Alpha Phi Alpha was marching with him.”

The program inside the KUC Theater ended with Green leading the audience in reciting MTSU’s True Blue Pledge. The crowd then braved the frigid temperatures and gathered for the candlelight vigil outside on the KUC Knoll.

Also presenting the event was the MTSU Center for Student Involvement and Leadership. Green also thanked Housing and Residential Life for creating an MLK video played during the event.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

Members of the MTSU Generation of Praise Gospel Choir performed a touching a cappella performance of ÒGlory, Glory HallelujahÓ during the Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration and candlelight video held Monday, Jan. 18, at Keathley University Center at MTSU. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Members of the MTSU Generation of Praise Gospel Choir perform an a cappella version of “Glory, Glory Hallelujah” during the Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration and candlelight vigil held Jan. 18 at MTSU.

Jan. 23 ‘Coaches vs. Cancer’ game aims to raise funds to fight disease

Middle Tennessee State University’s men’s basketball game Saturday, Jan. 23, against the visiting Rice Owls will support the American Cancer Society as part of the “Coaches vs. Cancer” program.

The 5 p.m. game will help raise awareness of the fight against cancer and demonstrate support for the society and its mission to eliminate cancer as a major health problem.

Funds raised at the game will go toward the total raised this year by the Relay For Life of Middle Tennessee State University. For more information or to donate, visit relayforlife.org/mtsu.

For game tickets, visit goblueraiders.com or call 615-898-2103 locally or dial toll free 1-888-YES-MTSU.

Coaches vs Cancer 2016

Fans are encouraged to wear purple in honor of those fighting cancer and in memory of loved ones lost to the disease.

MTSU alumnus and cancer survivor Wesley Taylor of Murfeesboro will lead the honorary tip-off. Follow the event on Twitter at #mtsucoachesvcancer.

Students from the Relay organizing committee will join MTSU cheerleaders to “storm the stands” at halftime for a one-minute fundraising challenge. Paper “sneaker cutouts” will also be available in exchange for a donation.

“Fighting cancer is a team effort and no one should have to face this disease alone,” said Kermit Davis, coach of the Blue Raiders men’s basketball team.

“Cancer has touched so many of our nation’s basketball coaches, just like it may have touched you, your family or friends. I hope all fans will join me on Jan. 23 to support the work of the American Cancer Society.”

Kermit Davis

Kermit Davis

Coaches vs. Cancer is a nationwide collaborative between the American Cancer Society and the National Association of Basketball Coaches.

The initiative aims to increase cancer awareness, highlight the importance of nutrition and physical activity in reducing a person’s cancer risk, and promote the society’s free programs and services available to those facing cancer.

Advances in prevention, early detection and treatment have contributed to a drop of more than 20 percent in cancer mortality rate in the past two decades, helping prevent more than 1.5 million cancer deaths that were projected to occur under previous rates.

MTSU will hold its annual Relay For Life celebration to benefit the American Cancer Society from 7 p.m. to 1 a.m. on April 8. Cancer information and support is available 24 hours a day by calling the American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345.

Since its inception in 1993, the American Cancer Society Coaches vs. Cancer initiative has raised nearly $100 million to support the Society’s mission.

The American Cancer Society is a global grassroots force of 2.5 million volunteers saving lives and fighting for every birthday threatened by every cancer in every community. As the largest voluntary health organization, the society’s efforts have contributed to a 22 percent decline in cancer death rates in the United States since 1991 and a 50 percent drop in smoking rates.

For more information, to get help, or to join the fight, call anytime at 1-800-227-2345 or visit cancer.org.

In this 2014 file photo, MTSU men's basketball head coach Kermit Davis gives instructions from the sidelines during a game again Rice University at Murphy Center. (MTSU file photo by J. Intintoli)

In this 2014 file photo, MTSU men’s basketball head coach Kermit Davis gives instructions from the sidelines during a game again Rice University at Murphy Center. (MTSU file photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU Keyboard Artist Series features faculty pianist Nadgir Jan. 19

MTSU’s School of Music continues its new Keyboard Artist Series Tuesday, Jan. 19, with a special free performance by School of Music professor Arunesh Nadgir in the university’s Wright Music Building.

Dr. Arunesh Nadgir

Dr. Arunesh Nadgir

Nadgir’s 8 p.m. free public concert, the fourth in the series, will be conducted inside the Wright Building’s Hinton Music Hall.

The coordinator of keyboard studies for MTSU’s renowned School of Music will perform “Sonata in E major” by Joseph Haydn, “Kreisleriana” by Robert Schumann, “Rain Tree Sketch II“ by Toru Takemitsu and “Sonata No. 3 in F sharp minor” by Alexander Scriabin.

“The Haydn E major sonata is very charming and sweet,” Nadgir explained. “Although the second movement has a more inward character, the outer movements are very light and carefree.”

School of Music new logo webCalling the Schumann piece “one of the great monumental achievements of the Romantic period” and the Takemitsu composition “a hauntingly beautiful work,” the professor added that each movement of Scriabin’s sonata, which the musician titled “States of the Soul,” “provides a glimpse into the human spirit.”

Nadgir has performed as a solo pianist and chamber musician in the United States, South America, Europe and Asia, in venues that include the Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, and has participated in several international music events.

Nadgir, who’s taught piano students since he was 17, was a member of the faculties at the New England Conservatory Preparatory in Massachusetts, the Eastman School of Music in New York and the Palisades School of Music in New Jersey before joining MTSU’s School of Music.

He’s been featured in live broadcasts on Nashville’s public radio station, WPLN, and New York City’s flagship public radio station, WNYC, and his recent local performances have included concerts with the Murfreesboro Symphony Orchestra, the Stones River Chamber Players and the Grammy-nominated ALIAS Chamber Ensemble.

You can enjoy a preview of Nadgir’s Jan. 19 concert below. He performs Bach’s “Partita No. 3 in A minor, BWV 827: Fantasia, Allemande, Corrente” on the stage of Hinton Hall.

http://youtu.be/s7vV6sqM7Q4

For more information on the new Keyboard Artist Series at MTSU, which features MTSU faculty and distinguished guest artists from around the world, visit www.mtsu.edu/music/keyboardseries.php.

For details on more MTSU School of Music concerts, call 615-898-2493 or visit the MTSU School of Music “Concert Calendar” link.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)