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Keyboard Artist Series kicks off new season with Sept. 11 concert

MTSU’s School of Music is opening the second year of its popular Keyboard Artist Series Sunday, Sept. 11, with a free public concert by associate piano professor Adam Clark in the university’s Wright Music Building.

Dr. Adam Clark

Dr. Adam Clark

Clark’s 3 p.m. performance, set for the Wright Building’s Hinton Music Hall, launches the 2016-17 concert series, which features MTSU faculty and distinguished guest artists from around the world. A searchable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

The professor will perform the complete “Op. 39 Études-Tableaux” by Sergei Rachmaninoff in honor of the work’s centennial.

“The études are incredible pieces, showcasing the breadth of Rachmaninoff’s wizardry as a pianist and composer,” said Clark, who also serves as president of the Middle Tennessee Music Teachers Association.

Click on the poster to see a larger version.

Click on the poster to see a larger version.

“One can hear magnificent depictions of Russian bells, the incorporation of chant-like melodies and an abundance of pianistic fireworks — all trademarks of Rachmaninoff’s music. The set is drenched in powerful imagery and imagination throughout.”

Clark noted that the composer wrote the “Études-Tableaux” — French for “study pictures,” or what Rachmaninoff called “picture pieces” designed to evoke images via music — in 1916 and 1917 and published the set in 1917. They were the last pieces Rachmaninoff composed in his homeland before the Russian Revolutions of 1917 forced him to flee forever.

“I’ve been in love with Rachmaninoff’s music for as long as I can remember. This performance will be my first of the complete set,” the professor noted.

Clark, a prizewinner in numerous competitions, has performed as a soloist, chamber musician and concerto soloist throughout the United States as well as in Belgium, Italy and South Korea. His performances have been broadcast on U.S. public radio and South Korean TV.

The 2016-17 Keyboard Artist Series also features three more concerts in Hinton Hall, including an Oct. 2 performance by special guests the Pridonoff Duo; a Jan. 29 recital by piano professor Charles Asche of the University of California, Santa Barbara; and a Feb. 27 concert by Arunesh Nadgir, coordinator of keyboard studies for MTSU’s School of Music.

For more information on the Keyboard Artist Series at MTSU, visit www.mtsu.edu/music/keyboardseries.php.

For details on more MTSU School of Music concerts, call 615-898-2493 or visit the MTSU School of Music “Concert Calendar” link.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Learn Spanish this fall at accelerated 5-day evening classes at MTSU

The Center for Accelerated Language Acquisition at MTSU is offering accelerated five-day Spanish classes this fall.

Costs are discounted for MTSU faculty, staff, and students as well as for high school students and K-12 teachers/administrators. These classes are open to anyone in the community (ages 13 and up) and target those wanting to start learning Spanish or improve current language skills.

Classes will be held in the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building. The class schedule is as follows:

Spring breakers from local schools and the community pose earlier this year after CALA's five-day accelerated Spanish Part 1 course at MTSU. (MTSU photo)

Spring breakers from local schools and the community pose earlier this year after CALA’s five-day accelerated Spanish Part 1 course at MTSU. (MTSU photo)

  • Spanish Part 1:  Sept. 5-9, 6-9:30 p.m., MTSU Honors 116
  • Spanish Part 1:  Oct. 3-7, 6-9:30 p.m., MTSU Honors 106 (coincides with Rutherford County Schools’ spring break)
  • Spanish Part 1:  Nov. 14-18, 6-9:30 p.m., MTSU Honors 106
  • Spanish Part 1:  Jan. 2-6, 2017, 6-9:30 p.m., MTSU Honors 106
  • Spanish Part 2:  Jan. 6-9, 2017, 6-9:30 p.m., MTSU Honors 106

“This is the perfect way to learn a lot of Spanish in a short amount of time,” said Brian Roberts, class instructor and assistant director of CALA, which is the language-training center of the MTSU Honors College.

CALA’s accelerated classes are engineered to provide rapid gains in the language by appealing to how the brain learns best, which is how people learn their native language — with lots of hands-on, interactive methods that take place in a fun, low-stress atmosphere using movement, songs, games and stories.

To learn more and register for classes, please visit CALA’s website at www.mtsu.edu/cala.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU veterans center briefs newcomers on resources, opportunities

New and returning MTSU student veterans and their families attended a “newcomers briefing” provided by the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center.

The event was held Aug. 17, in Cantrell Hall of the Tom H. Jackson Building.

 

Isaiah Lindauer, 10, front, his sister, Isabella, 7, and their father, Jeremy Lindauer, go through the food line in Cantrell Hall of MTSU's Tom H. Jackson Building for the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center's student veterans newcomers briefing Aug. 17. Jeremy Lindauer, a transfer from Nashville State Community College, will be a junior majoring in mechatronics engineering. He was a sergeant (E-5) in the U.S. Army. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

Isaiah Lindauer, 10, front, his sister, Isabella, 7, and their father, Jeremy Lindauer, go through the food line in Cantrell Hall of MTSU’s Tom H. Jackson Building for the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center’s student veterans newcomers briefing Aug. 17. Jeremy Lindauer, a transfer from Nashville State Community College, will be a junior majoring in mechatronics engineering. He was a sergeant (E-5) in the U.S. Army. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

The briefing was a veterans’ orientation for them and their families, enabling them to find campus resources, said Dr. Hilary Miller, center director.

Miller and her staff were targeting new-to-MTSU student veterans and family members, but all student vets and their families were welcome, she said.

MTSU Vets Center logo“Our goal is to make sure they have on-campus contacts for all offices that can help them be successful,” Miller said. “We want them to know the center staff, be connected to us and know other student veterans.”

The agenda included:

  • Barbecue dinner.
  • Welcome, introduction of staff and center’s mission, led by Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership and retired U.S. Army lieutenant general.
  • Veterans’ introductions.
  • Current center programs and fall semester events, led by Miller.
  • MTSU and Veterans relationship, led by Dr. Derek Frisby, an MTSU alumnus and faculty member in the Global Studies and Cultural Geography program in the College of Liberal Arts.
  • Discovering campus resources (includes tours and information about G.I. Bill, VetSuccess on Campus, tutoring and more).
  • College challenge from Miller, emphasizing graduation and employment expectations.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Zachary Lopez, left, and MTSU freshman biology major Rafael Lopez of Readyville, Tennessee, learn about Health Services and Health Promotions offerings from Rick Chapman, right, and Lisa Schrader Aug. 17 near the Military Memorial site outside the Tom H. Jackson Building. They attended the newcomer briefing held by the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center.

Zachary Lopez, left, and MTSU freshman biology major Rafael Lopez of Readyville, Tennessee, learn about Health Services and Health Promotions offerings from Rick Chapman, right, and Lisa Schrader Aug. 17 near the Military Memorial site outside the Tom H. Jackson Building. They attended the newcomer briefing held by the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center. Athletics and Campus Recreation Center marking also participated.

Keith M. Huber, left, MTSU senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives, welcomes all student veterans and their family members during the Aug. 17 orientation to campus and the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center array of opportunities. The event took place inside and outside the Tom H. Jackson Building.

Keith M. Huber, left, MTSU senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives, welcomes all student veterans and their family members during the Aug. 17 orientation to campus and the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center array of opportunities. The event took place inside and outside the Tom H. Jackson Building.

 

MTSU students, faculty staff ‘Meet Murfreesboro’ businesses

Hundreds of MTSU students, faculty and staff met Murfreesboro as city businesses, restaurants, religious organizations and others showed what they have to offer during the annual “Meet Murfreesboro” Aug. 23-24 in the Student Union Commons.

The annual Leadership and Service and New Student and Family Programs Week of Welcome event introduces the off-campus businesses, restaurants and ministries to students and MTSU employees.

“It’s a way for students to familiarize themselves on and off-campus,” said Sierra Gibson, a sophomore psychology major from Memphis. “I feel like it’s a good place for students to find things to do around campus and in the community.”

Kroger, Ideas Tees, pizza establishments, various banks, cellphone companies and ministry-related organizations were among the many participating organizations. Pizza, hot dogs, lemonade and other food items were available.

Week of Welcome activities continue Thursday, Aug. 25, with the MTSU Department Fair from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Student Union Commons and Comedy Show at 7 p.m. in Murphy Center. To learn more, visit http://mtsu.edu/nsfp/welcome.php.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Hillari Smith, right, of Manchester, Tennessee, offers free items while sharing information about Ascend Federal Credit Union to MTSU students attending the “Meet Murfreesboro” event Aug. 23 in the Student Union Commons. The two-day event drew hundreds of students, faculty and staff. (MTSU photos by Kimi Conro)

Hillari Smith, right, of Manchester, Tennessee, offers free items while sharing information about Ascend Federal Credit Union to MTSU students attending the “Meet Murfreesboro” event Aug. 23 in the Student Union Commons. The two-day event drew hundreds of students, faculty and staff. (MTSU photos by Kimi Conro)

MTSU students listen as Angie Schreiber, center, who works special events for Murfreesboro-based Ideas Tees/Raider Tees, promotes the sale of T-shirts and hats Aug. 23 during “Meet Murfreesboro,” a Week of Welcome activity in the Student Union Commons.

MTSU students listen as Angie Schreiber, center, who works special events for Murfreesboro-based Ideas Tees/Raider Tees, promotes the sale of T-shirts and hats Aug. 23 during “Meet Murfreesboro,” a Week of Welcome activity in the Student Union Commons.


MTSU students ready for Week of Welcome events on campus

Aug. 15, 2016

Thousands of new and returning MTSU students are converging on campus this week to prepare for the start of the 2016-17 academic year.

MTSU freshmen Erik Manger, left, and Brianna Johnson, both 18, check out pamphlets provided by Health Promotion Director Lisa Schrader Thursday (Sept. 3) during the annual Department Fair in the Student Union Commons. Manger is a computer science major from Hermitage, Tenn., while Johnson is a premed (science) major from Columbia, Tenn. Health Promotion was one of more than 30 departments represented at the event. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

In this September 2015 file photo, then-MTSU freshmen Erik Manger, left, and Brianna Johnson check out pamphlets provided by Health Promotion Director Lisa Schrader during the annual Department Fair in the Student Union Commons. Manger is a computer science major from Hermitage, Tenn., while Johnson is a premed major from Columbia, Tenn. Health Promotion was one of more than 30 departments represented at the event. (MTSU file photo by Randy Weiler)

To help kick off the fall 2016 semester, MTSU’s Office of New Student and Family Programs has planned a boatload of Week of Welcome student activities with a theme of “All Aboard! Traditions are Anchored Here.”

New Student and Family Programs conducts Week of Welcome to greet both new and returning students awaiting the first day of classes Monday, Aug. 22.

To see the complete list of Week of Welcome activities, visit http://mtsu.edu/nsfp/welcome.php.

Week of Welcome activities begin Friday, Aug. 19, with We-Haul move-in day, dinner and an outdoor movie, “Finding Nemo” and continue through Saturday, Sept. 3, when the Blue Raiders entertain visiting Alabama A&M for a 6 p.m. football game in Floyd Stadium.

“Week of Welcome provides the perfect opportunity for new students to get their MTSU experience off on the right track,” said Jacki Lancaster, coordinator in New Student and Family Programs.

“There are events for students to have fun, meet new people and bring their entire family. There are other events that encourage new students to connect with MTSU and the MTSU community. We look forward to having the campus buzzing with students and their families this weekend.”

Activities include:

2016 Week of Welcome

Click on the poster to see a larger version.

  • University Convocation — 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 21, in Murphy Center. Special guest is Rajiv Chandrasekaran, co-author with Howard Schultz of “For Love of Country: What Our Veterans Can Teach Us About Citizenship, Heroism and Sacrifice,” a national best-seller and the 2016 Summer Reading Program book for new freshmen (www.mtsu.edu/summerreading). The President’s Picnic in Floyd Stadium follows Convocation.
  • Meet Murfreesboro — 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, Aug. 23-24, in the Student Union Commons. Students learn about city businesses.
  • MTSU Department Fair — 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 25, in the Student Union Commons. Numerous campus departments provide information and answer students’ questions.
  • Comedy Show — 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 25, in Murphy Center, featuring MTV “Wild ’n Out” comedians Rip Michaels, Darren “Big Baby” Brand and Aarona Lopez. This event requires a student ID for admission.
  • Raider Entertainment Variety Show — 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 26, in Tucker Theatre, featuring comedy hypnotist Eric Mina. This event requires a student ID for admission.
  • Student Government Association Fight Song Competition — 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 27, in Murphy Center.
  • Student Employment Fair — 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Aug. 29. On- and off-campus job opportunities await students.
  • Volunteer Fair — 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 30, in the Student Union Commons. Various organizations provide students with volunteer options.

MTSU Student Programming Director Rich Kershaw noted that his office, along with Raider Entertainment and New Student and Family Programs, are proud to bring the comedians from MTV’s “Wild ’n Out” to MTSU for a live performance.

Following the comedians’ 60-minute show, students will be invited onstage to play the comedy show “Wild ’n Out,” Kershaw added. For more information, call 615-898-2551 or visit www.mtsu.edu/events.

All Week of Welcome activities are part of the Connection Point campaign to help students become involved and engaged with MTSU. Students should bring their IDs to each event; for more information, visit www.mtsu.edu/stuaff/connect.

For more information, call 615-898-2454 or visit the New Student and Family Programs website at http://mtsu.edu/nsfp/welcome.php.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU guest astronauts entertain Civil Air Patrol national conference

Rhea Seddon and Robert “Hoot” Gibson shared their out-of-this-world experiences as astronauts with 1,000 people attending the 75th anniversary celebration of the Civil Air Patrol Friday (Aug. 12) in Nashville.

As guests of MTSU’s Department of Aerospace, a sponsoring partner of the organization’s national conference, Murfreesboro residents and retired NASA astronauts Seddon and Gibson entertained the crowd with their separate stories about life before, during and after their space careers.

Retired NASA astronaut Dr. Rhea Seddon, right, and Dr. Wendy Beckman, interim chair of MTSU's Department of Aerospace, chat before both spoke at the Civil Air Patrol Women's Leadership Forum sponsored by MTSU. (MTSU photos by Kimi Conro)

Retired NASA astronaut Dr. Rhea Seddon, right, and Dr. Wendy Beckman, interim chair of MTSU’s Department of Aerospace, chat before both spoke at the Civil Air Patrol Women’s Leadership Forum sponsored by MTSU. (MTSU photos by Kimi Conro)

The Civil Air Patrol, an official civilian auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, is a congressionally chartered and federally supported nonprofit corporation. The CAP’s conference at Gaylord Opryland Hotel is 35 miles from MTSU, which features nationally ranked aerospace as one of its top programs.

Just before starting one of several book signings for her “Go for Orbit” now in its fourth printing and two more talks later in the day, Seddon told an audience it is “wonderful to see young people get excited about aviation and space.” A number of event participants are part of Civil Air Patrol cadet programs.

During the three speaking sessions, Seddon shared the challenges the small-town girl and “Southern Belle” faced in first becoming a physician and then committing to NASA and its previously male-dominated astronaut program before beginning the space shuttle Challenger program.

aerospace logo web“They (NASA) were willing to give women a try,” said Seddon, who praised Gibson for helping her master computer and technology issues. “Once I got in the astronaut program, I knew nothing about engineering and technology. I was stuck in the ‘SSSS’ portion of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math).”

As a younger woman, one of her favorite sayings was, “It doesn’t hurt to try.” And try she did, even realizing while looking toward space, a half-million pounds of explosives were under her and someone was going to light a fuse or, in this case, push a button for lift-off.

Gaining confidence and having determination helped her persevere. A career with Vanderbilt University Medical Center and her book have proven there can be life after NASA.

“I learned principles I used in aviation were not being used well in medicine,” she said, mentioning teamwork, communication and standardization of processes (crew resource management, she called it). “With help from some pilots, we began taking those things to healthcare to improve safety, reliability and team effectiveness.”

It led to the formation of a company to help other hospitals do the same thing, she added.

“Those are things that can be used in every workplace — even valuable in the Civil Air Patrol’s education and leadership program,” she said.

Retired NASA astronaut Robert "Hoot" Gibson addresses the general assembly during the Civil Air Patrol National Conference Aug. 12 in Nashville. (MTSU photo by Kimi Cunro)

Retired NASA astronaut Robert “Hoot” Gibson addresses the general assembly during the Civil Air Patrol National Conference Aug. 12 in Nashville. (MTSU photo by Kimi Cunro)

With “Go for Orbit,” she felt it was a “story worth telling,” she said. “It was a labor of love to write my experiences down. I hope by passing on a tale of what it took, how it felt, the good times and the sad times … that young women can see what it takes to have a wonderful and successful life. And women like you who are well along on your journey will see the parallels with your lives.”

Gibson invokes plenty of humor in his presentation. Just as his wife did, Gibson discussed the future of the Civil Air Patrol in his closing remarks.

“The future of the country is great and the future of the Civil Air Patrol is even greater … motivating and developing young people,” he said.

MTSU vice president of marketing and communications Andrew Oppmann, a lieutenant colonel with the Civil Air Patrol, introduced Seddon and Gibson, and informed the group about the university’s special partnership with CAP.

Dr. Wendy Beckman, interim chair in the MTSU aerospace department, discussed the MTSU program that features professional pilot, air traffic control and a five-year-old unmanned aircraft systems (drone) concentration. In May, MTSU unveiled a new $700,000 flight simulator building at the university’s flight operations center at Murfreesboro Airport.

Beckman introduced Seddon at the CAP Women’s Leadership Forum sponsored by the aerospace department.

Alumnus Terry “Max” Haston, adjutant general with the Tennessee Army National Guard, and state Sen. Jim Tracy, a strong supporter of MTSU, attended the morning general session and were introduced by Oppmann.

Col. Barry Melton, commander of the Civil Air Patrol’s Southeast Region, also is an MTSU graduate.

In May 2014, MTSU and the Civil Air Patrol’s Tennessee Wing formed a partnership in aerospace education for Tennessee high school students in the U.S. Air Force auxiliary’s cadet program.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

(From left) Col. Barry Melton, Civil Air Patrol Southeast Region commander; Patrick Sheehan, Tennessee Emergency Management Agency director; Lt. Col. and state Rep. John Ragan, commander of the State Legislative Squadron; Lt. Gen. Max Haston, Tennessee Adjutant General; Maj. Gen. Joe Vazquez, CAP national commander; Maj. and State Sen. Jim Tracy, a member of the legislative squadron; Col. Arlinda Bailey, CAP Tennessee Wing commander; and Lt. Col. Andrew Oppmann, Tennessee Wing headquarters staff and MTSU vice president for marketing and communications are shown during the CAP 75th annual conference in Nashville. (MTSU photo by Kimi Cunro)

(From left) Col. Barry Melton, Civil Air Patrol Southeast Region commander; Patrick Sheehan, Tennessee Emergency Management Agency director; Lt. Col. and state Rep. John Ragan, commander of the State Legislative Squadron; Lt. Gen. Max Haston, Tennessee Adjutant General; Maj. Gen. Joe Vazquez, CAP national commander; Maj. and State Sen. Jim Tracy, a member of the legislative squadron; Col. Arlinda Bailey, CAP Tennessee Wing commander; and Lt. Col. Andrew Oppmann, Tennessee Wing headquarters staff and MTSU vice president for marketing and communications are shown during the CAP 75th annual conference in Nashville.

Maj. Gen. Joe Vazquez, left, Civil Air Patrol national commander, presents state Sen. and Maj. Jim Tracy, a member of the state legislative squadron, with a certificate. (MTSU photo by Kimi Cunro)

Maj. Gen. Joe Vazquez, left, Civil Air Patrol national commander, presents state Sen. and Maj. Jim Tracy, a member of the state legislative squadron, with a certificate. (MTSU photo by Kimi Cunro)

MTSU honors graduating student veterans with Stole Ceremony [+VIDEO]

Joe Stout figures he has spent about half his life trying to earn a bachelor’s degree.

On Saturday, Aug. 6, he will earn his MTSU degree in liberal studies with a concentration in management training. On Aug. 3, MTSU honored the U.S. Army veteran and nine other student veterans and presented them with special stoles they can wear with their caps and gowns at commencement in Murphy Center.

MTSU’s leadership honored 10 of the 28 summer 2016 graduating student veterans during the fifth Graduating Veterans Stole Ceremony, recognizing their “commitment, recognition and appreciation,” said Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives. The university conducts the stole ceremony each semester a few days before commencement.

https://youtu.be/RSoEO4XVn-o

“In order to graduate and it be done and then to be with fellow veterans that we’ve all kind of shared the same fox hole or whatever you might want to call it, it just means a lot to be able to be there with fellow brothers and sisters in arms,” said Stout, 50, a resident of Brush Creek, Tennessee, in Smith County.

Stout thanked his professors “for teaching an old dog some new tricks,” his academic advisers for “making sure he got things done right,” the university in general and the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center inside Keathley University Center.

University President Sidney A. McPhee, interim Provost Mark Byrnes and Huber, who had a nearly 40-year career in the U.S. Army, shared remarks.

Among those attending the event were Many Bears Grinder, Tennessee Department of Veterans Affairs commissioner; Edna MacDonald, director of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Nashville regional benefit office; Suzanne Jené, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System interim health system director; and Mike Krause, new Tennessee Higher Education Commission director.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Keith Huber, (Lt. General U.S. Army Ret.), Senior Adviser for Veterans and Leadership Initiatives presiding over the Class of Summer 2016 Graduating Veterans Stole Ceremony. Joe Stout and Commissioner Many Bears Ginder

Graduating veteran Joe Stout, left, of Brush Creek, Tenn., receives a pin from Many Bears Grinder, Tennessee Department of Veterans Affairs commissioner, Aug. 3 during the fifth Stole Ceremony in Cantrell Hall of the Tom H. Jackson Building. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

Keith Huber, (Lt. General U.S. Army Ret.), Senior Adviser for Veterans and Leadership Initiatives presiding over the Class of Summer 2016 Graduating Veterans Stole Ceremony.

Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives, makes a point during the Aug. 3 Stole Ceremony for graduating student veterans. Huber is a retired U.S. Army lieutenant general.

Graduating student veteran Anthony Jimcoily of Murfreesboro, shown second from left, is joined by MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, interim Provost Mark Byrnes and Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives and retired U.S. Army lieutenant general, during the fifth Stole Ceremony in the Tom H. Jackson Building Aug. 3.

Graduating student veteran Anthony Jimcoily of Murfreesboro, shown second from left, is joined by MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, interim Provost Mark Byrnes and Keith M. Huber, senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives and retired U.S. Army lieutenant general, during the fifth Graduating Veterans Stole Ceremony in the Tom H. Jackson Building Aug. 3.

Girls are rocking the house at 2016 Southern Girls Rock Camp

The 14th annual Southern Girls Rock Camp is rolling for girls ages 10 to 17 who want to express themselves musically in a safe, positive environment.

The day camp is underway July 25-29 at MTSU’s Wright Music Building. To find parking and buildings on campus, go to http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Members of the Southern Girls Rock Camp band “Spysee” rehearse before the showcase concert scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, July 30, at MTSU’s Wright Music Hall. (MTSU photos by Kimi Conro)

Members of the Southern Girls Rock Camp band “Spysee” rehearse before the showcase concert scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, July 30, at MTSU’s Wright Music Hall. (MTSU photos by Kimi Conro)

A summertime tradition, the day camp offers instruction in guitar, vocals, bass, keyboards and drums, as well as panel discussions and workshops on various aspects of both the art and business of music.

More than 50 budding female musicians from ages 10 to 17 have spent the past week collaborating on instrumentation, composing and screen printing and discussing music issue, as well as interacting with professional acts like Sallow, Wu Fei, Sarabeth Taite and Nightblonde.

They’ve formed their own bands throughout the week in preparation for the showcase concert at 2 p.m. Saturday, July 30, in the Wright Music Building’s Hinton Hall. Admission is a suggested $10 donation.

“Having a space where youth can come together, make music, communicate through music and unpack a lot of dynamic issues through music education and collaboration, I think, is pretty rare, especially in the realm of rock and roll, which is historically so male and white,” said Sarah Bandy, executive director of the camp’s parent organization, Youth Empowerment through Arts and Humanities, also known as YEAH!

This year, “band practice is a little bit longer, and instrument instruction is a little bit shorter, so that there’ll be more time to be with their bands,” said Bandy.

Jerry Coutcher, a 2016 Southern Girls Rock Camp participant and the drummer for the new band “The Infinity,” rehearses before the showcase concert scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, July 30, at MTSU’s Wright Music Hall. (MTSU photo by Kimi Conro)

Jerry Coutcher, a 2016 Southern Girls Rock Camp participant and the drummer for the new band “The Infinity,” rehearses before the showcase concert scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, July 30, at MTSU’s Wright Music Hall.

Prizes available through a silent auction at the showcase include a drum kit, a Fender guitar and other musical instruments, as well as gift certificates from several vendors.Southern Girls Rock Camp 2016-logo_web

This year’s campers will interact with speakers from Radical Arts, a Murfreesboro-based artistic group that declares its mission “to bring the arts to the community in a positive, enlightening and educational way.”

Nonviolent Communication Nashville, a nonprofit organization that professes to be “a diverse network of people and communities in Nashville and Middle Tennessee committed to learning, practicing and sharing nonviolent communication,” also will lead a panel discussion.

Workshops will engage campers in songwriting, screen printing, recording, “zine” making, and arts and activism.

In addition to corporate sponsors, MTSU’s sponsors include the President’s Commission on the Status of Women, the June Anderson Center for Women and Nontraditional Students, the Center for Popular Music and the National Women’s History Month Committee.

Tuition is $320 per camper and scholarships and donated instruments are available. However, only about 50 campers will be admitted. For more information, contact Bandy at director@yeahrocks.org or 615-849-8140 or go to www.yeahrocks.org.

— Gina Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

For 30 local children, arts turn STEM into STEAM Week at MTSU

Take STEM — science, technology, engineering and mathematics — and add the arts. It turns STEM into STEAM.

More than 30 Murfreesboro and Rutherford Country youngsters in grades K-7 are experiencing STEAM Week at MTSU.

Sponsored by the Tennessee STEM Education Center, STEAM Week is an art- and dance-focused camp combined with science, technology, engineering and mathematics training, along with the added discipline of visual arts. Students are being exposed to different art forms including mural design, ceramics, clay and oil paints.

Students participate in a dance routine outdoors while attending STEAM Week at MTSU's Fairview Building July 21. (MTSU photos by Kimi Conro)

Students participate in a dance routine outdoors while attending STEAM Week at MTSU’s Fairview Building July 21. (MTSU photos by Kimi Conro)

Annie Frierson, 10, a sixth-grader at Mitchell-Neilson Elementary School, said the event “was really fun.”

“I learned a lot about art and learned about coding. We played with robots in the technology lab.”

Frierson has attended Camp STEM at MTSU, but this was her first time to be a part of STEAM Week.

Activities included:

  • Building “doodling robots,” creations that drew for the children.
  • A visit from artist Jonathan Garner, who brought the science of explosion.
  • Exploring the science of music with Hobgood Elementary teacher Corynn Moore and Matthew Pyles from Harpeth Hall School in Nashville.
  • The science of dance, led by instructor Heather Brown, an educational assistant at Mitchell-Neilson.
  • A visit by Murfreesboro City Police Department’s SWAT team robot.

The group will visit the MTSU Engineering Technology laboratories and learn about solar boats, lunar rovers and more.

Part of July 19’s activities were filmed by Nashville’s WNPT for airing at a later date.

To learn about future Camp STEM and STEAM Weeks at MTSU, visit www.campstem.us, email David Lockett at David.Lockett@mtsu.edu or info@campSTEM.us or call 615-569-5904.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Led by Matthew Pyles, left, a teacher at Nashville's Harpeth Hall School, students attending STEAM Week at MTSU listen closely to try to hear sounds July 21 in the Fairview Building.

Led by Matthew Pyles, left, a teacher at Nashville’s Harpeth Hall School, students attending STEAM Week at MTSU listen closely to try to hear sounds July 21 in the Fairview Building.

Children play with a remote-controlled robotic toy during STEAM Week at MTSU July 21 in the Fairview Building on campus.

Children play with a remote-controlled robotic toy during STEAM Week at MTSU July 21 in the Fairview Building on campus.

Register now for July 28 annual Business Tax Seminar at MTSU

Registration is open for the eighth annual 2016 Tennessee Business Tax Seminar Series to be held July 28 at MTSU.

The Tennessee Department of Revenue and the Department of Accounting at MTSU’s Jones College of Business are hosting the event, which will be held on the second floor of the newly renovated Andrew Woodfin Miller Sr. Education Center at 503 E. Bell St.

The registration fee is $190 for all participants. Registration and other information can be found at http://www.mtsu.edu/accounting/seminars.php. Free parking will be available.Accounting seminar graphic-July2016

Dr. Jeannie Harrington

Dr. Jeannie Harrington

The seminar is designed to provide current, in-depth information on Tennessee tax issues to business owners, CPAs, and other interested parties. State tax specialists will present recent developments in legislation, including updates from the current 2016 legislative session and discuss various tax types and exemptions including business, sales and use, gift and inheritance, individual income and tangible personal property.

Individuals who attend the seminar will be provided with comprehensive materials covering these topics and will have the opportunity to ask questions. Continuing Professional Education (CPE) and Continuing Education Unit (CEU) credits may be obtained for these sessions.

Representatives from the Tennessee Department of Revenue, Tennessee Comptroller for the Treasury and Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development will be providing the main speakers. New MTSU accounting department chair, Jeannie Harrington, will provide opening remarks.

For more information, contact Tonya Davenport at tonya.davenport@mtsu.edu or 615-898-5306.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU ACE Camp recruits future builders, designers [+VIDEO]

One of 17 high school students attending the MTSU ACE Summer Camp, Dylan Akers obtains his love for building and design through DNA.

His father, Chris Akers, is a civil engineer with Littlejohn Engineering Associates, an S&ME company, in Nashville. And the passion flowed to Dylan, 17, a rising Franklin (Tennessee) High School senior.

The ACE Mentor Program camp, which is free to participants and the only one in the U.S. this summer, brings students from Atlanta, Birmingham, Brentwood, Nashville, Murfreesboro and elsewhere to learn about architecture, construction and engineering — hence the ACE acronym.

https://youtu.be/7jP3pr1WXUM

“It’s a high school mentoring program that encourages students through mentoring and scholarships to pursue careers in these disciplines,” said Tom Gormley, associate professor in the MTSU School of Concrete and Construction.

Led locally by Jack Tipton and Dan Ryan and facilitated by MTSU faculty, ACE mentors, whose companies helped pay half of the students’ camp fees, hope their recruiting efforts attract the teenagers after finishing college. Tipton is director of ACE regional programs for the Southeast and Ryan is ACE Mentor Program of Greater Nashville vice president.

Dylan Akers attended the camp as a junior, made closing remarks during the ACE banquet, was interviewed for an ACE video and received a $2,000 scholarship. As part of a structural team in 2015, Akers’ energy overflowed as he spoke.

“(Team members and ACE mentors) said to me, ‘We love your passion,’” Akers said.

“We’ve gone to construction sites, we’ve been all around campus and we’ve had several different teachers and mentors from different firms this year,” Akers added. “The fact ACE is offering this for kids my age is phenomenal. We have kids coming together, all for the love of the field.”

ACE Camp attendee Darrien McFarland, left, of Birmingham, Alabama, makes concrete while fellow camper Kenroy Stewart of Atlanta, Georgia, watches MTSU School of Concrete and Construction chair Heather Brown stir Stewart's batch of concrete mix during a Monday (July 11) scheduled activity in the Voorhies Engineering Technology Building. McFarland, 15, will be a sophomore at Mayfield High School in Birmingham this fall. Stewart, 17, is a rising senior at Martin Luther King Jr. High School in Atlanta. The camp promotes architectural, construction and engineering, and ends July 16. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

ACE Camp attendee Darrien McFarland, left, of Birmingham, Alabama, makes concrete while fellow camper Kenroy Stewart of Atlanta, Georgia, watches MTSU School of Concrete and Construction chair Heather Brown stir Stewart’s batch of concrete mix during a Monday (July 11) scheduled activity in the Voorhies Engineering Technology Building. McFarland, 15, will be a sophomore at Mayfield High School in Birmingham this fall. Stewart, 17, is a rising senior at Martin Luther King Jr. High School in Atlanta. The camp promotes architectural, construction and engineering, and ends July 16. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

Reagan Lannom, 15, a rising 10th-grader at Central Magnet School in Murfreesboro, called the camp “eye-opening.”

“I would recommend this to a lot of people,” added Lannom, who plans to join Central’s ACE program. “I wasn’t exactly sure wheat architecture is about, but it showed me that multiple things can come together.”

Reginald Stuart, 15, a rising Siegel High School sophomore who is a member of the Stars’ band and track and field teams, “enjoys seeing how buildings work and their design.”

“There has been a whole lot of teamwork,” he added. “I like the communication. That’s the way it should be.”

Janis Brickey, associate professor in the MTSU Department of Human Sciences, said one of the key components “helps them understand the importance of collaboration.”

Attendees received the MTSU dorm, dining and Campus Recreation Center experience and they made field trips to downtown Murfreesboro and to Vanderbilt University in Nashville.

At MTSU, they made concrete, designed an architectural model and participated in a mock bid and other hands-on activities.

To learn about opportunities for the 2017 MTSU ACE Camp, call Tipton at 615-752-7351.

For information about the program, visit http://www.acementor.org/ or http://www.acementor.org/affiliates/tennessee/.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU ACE Camp 2016 students listen as Andy Van Pelt of Nashville-based Clark Construction makes a presentation at a job trailer site during the group's field trip to Nashville July 14. (Photo by Tom Gormley)

MTSU ACE Camp 2016 students listen as Andy Van Pelt, far right, of Nashville-based Clark Construction makes a presentation at a job trailer site during the group’s field trip to Nashville July 14. (Photo by Tom Gormley)

MTSU ACE Camp 2016 group photo

Before having dinner July 13, MTSU ACE Summer Camp high school attendees are shown with university students and Tom Gormley, far right second row, an associate professor in the School of Concrete and Construction. Participants came from across the South. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)