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TSSAA keeps Spring Fling events, basketball championships at MTSU

Middle Tennessee State University will continue its long-running and successful run of hosting state championships for select high school sports at its facilities following a recent decision by the TSSAA.

The Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association’s Board of Control voted Jan. 12 at its meeting in Hermitage, Tennessee, to extend its contract with the Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce to host the “Spring Fling” championships through 2021.

Chris Massaro

Chris Massaro

Spring Fling is the series of championship competitions featuring the TSSAA five spring sports: track and field, baseball, boys’ soccer, softball, and tennis.

MTSU partners with the chamber to host the track and field events at the Dean A. Hayes Track & Soccer Stadium while also serving as the site for the baseball championships at Reese-Smith Field.

TSSAA logoThe TSSAA Board also voted to extend the contract with the chamber to host the Division I Girls’ and Boys’ State Basketball Championships through 2021. The tournaments are held each March inside MTSU’s Murphy Center; this year’s events are set March 8-11 and March 15-18, respectively.

“We are proud to host these championship events at Middle Tennessee,” said MTSU Director of Athletics Chris Massaro. “It’s one of the most important events in these young students’ lives and we are thrilled to help provide that experience.

“Anytime we can bring high school students to our campus, it benefits the entire university and our community.”

The Chamber of Commerce has estimated Spring Fling brings in about $3.5 million in tourism dollars to the local economy by drawing thousands of visitors from throughout the region each year. Each of the four-day TSSAA high school basketball tournaments generates similar tourism revenue for Rutherford County.

For more information about the TSSAA tournaments, visit http://tssaa.org.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU will observe MLK holiday with Jan. 16 candlelight vigil

While MTSU will be closed Monday, Jan. 16, in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the campus community will conduct a candlelight vigil in his honor.

MTSU students gather on the Keathley University Center knoll for a candlelight vigil as part of the 2016 Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration on campus. (MTSU file photo by Andy Heidt)

MTSU students gather on the Keathley University Center knoll for a candlelight vigil as part of the 2016 Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration on campus. (MTSU file photo by Andy Heidt)

The Office of Intercultural & Diversity Affairs will hold the vigil, hosted by Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc., from 6 to 8 p.m. Jan. 16 in the Student Union Ballroom.

This event is free and open to the public.

Derrick Hayes

Derrick Hayes

Derrick Hayes, a motivational speaker and author of “1 WORD is All It Takes,” will deliver the keynote address.

Hayes developed the Wall of Excellence Scholarship and Development Fund at Tennessee State University, his alma mater, which has raised more than $500,000 for students in TSU’s College of Business, according to his website, www.derrickhayes.com.

The evening also will feature musical performances from Don Aliquo, MTSU professor of saxophone and jazz studies, and MTSU’s Generation of Purpose Gospel Choir, and presentations by Alpha Phi Alpha members.

“The vigil serves as an opportunity to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s commitment to social activism and the legacy that has inspired us to continue his movement,” said Daniel Green, director of the Office of Intercultural and Diversity Affairs.

Green said attendees should make note of the venue change from the traditional vigil location at Keathley University Center Theater to the new location inside the Student Union in the second-floor ballroom.

For off-campus visitors seeking directions to the Student Union, a searchable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

For more information, contact Green at 615-898-5812 or daniel.green@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. addresses a crowd from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial where he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech during the Aug. 28, 1963, march on Washington, D.C. MTSU students and others will celebrate King's memory during a Jan. 16 candlelight vigil at 6 p.m. in the Student Union. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Department of Defense Archives)

The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. addresses a crowd from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial where he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech during the Aug. 28, 1963, march on Washington, D.C. MTSU students and others will celebrate King’s memory during a Jan. 16 candlelight vigil at 6 p.m. in the Student Union. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Department of Defense Archives)

Hood, Hale Sr. among 6 Journalism Hall of Fame inductees [+VIDEO]

The Tennessee Journalism Hall of Fame honored six broadcast journalists, including some with strong MTSU ties, during a banquet and awards ceremony Thursday, Dec. 8, at the Murfreesboro Association of Realtors Training Center at 311 Butler Drive.

The 2016 class of inductees includes former state representative, MTSU alumnus and current university administrator John Hood, who began his journalism career on local radio. Also being honored posthumously is sports director and announcer Monte Hale Sr., who was “the voice of the MTSU Blue Raiders” from 1961 to 1980 and whose name graces Murphy Center’s Hale Arena.

John Hood

John Hood

Monte Hale Sr.

Monte Hale Sr.

Demetria Kalodimos

Demetria Kalodimos

Other members of the 2016 class include:

  • Tom Britt of Jackson, Tennessee, a news producer, anchor and reporter for WBBJ-TV.
  • Hudley Crockett of Nashville, a former news director, anchor and producer for WSIX-TV (now WKRN) and former press secretary for Tennessee Gov. Buford Ellington.
  • Darrell Patterson of Chattanooga, retired sports director and anchor for WTVC-TV Channel 9.
  • WSMV-TV Channel 4 anchor Demetria Kalodimos, who was the surprise sixth inductee at the end of the ceremony, served as emcee for the event. See Channel 4’s tribute to her here.

Guest speakers included Murfreesboro Mayor Shane McFarland; Ken Paulson, dean of the MTSU College of Media and Entertainment; Ron Fryar, president of the Tennessee Press Association and owner of the Cannon Courier; and Whit Adamson, president of the Tennessee Association of Broadcasters.

TNJHOF BANNER-webThis group was the fourth to be honored by the Tennessee Journalism Hall of Fame, a nonprofit organization based in the John Bragg Media and Entertainment Building on the campus of Middle Tennessee State University.

A listing of previous Tennessee Journalism Hall of Fame inductees may be found at www.tnjournalismhof.org.

Individuals who have distinguished themselves through news or business management, leadership in the industry, or in the ordinary practice of all forms of journalism can be considered for induction into the hall. They may be living or dead.

Nominees for the 2017 class are being accepted now. Nomination forms and guidelines may be downloaded from the TJHOF website. For more information, contact Hall of Fame board member Hooper Penuel at 615-347-1672.

Here’s a video recap of the ceremony:

About the Class of 2016 

• Tom Britt: Britt is a 40-year veteran of electronic media in West Tennessee, the past 19 or so years with WBBJ-TV 7 Eyewitness News. During his tenure, he has reported, and anchored Midday and ABC 7 Eyewitness News at 5 and 6 p.m. Currently he anchors and produces the midday, noon and 5 p.m. newscasts. Before coming to WBBJ, Britt spent 21 years in radio and area stations working news, announcing and sport casting. For more than three decades he has been the voice of University of Tennessee-Martin football and women’s basketball with the Skyhawks Sports Network. He also serves as the color analyst for UT Martin men’s basketball.

Tom Britt

Tom Britt

Hudley Crockett

Hudley Crockett

Darrell Patterson

Darrell Patterson

• Hudley Crockett: A native of Rutherford County, Crockett began his journalism career working for radio stations in North Carolina, New Mexico and Alabama where in 1955 he was named as Sportscaster of the Year. In 1956, Crockett returned to Nashville, where he graduated from West End High School, and was named sports director for WSIX Radio and Television. Radio listeners heard Crockett’s voice during this time announcing a wide range of high school and college games, which included voice over of Tennessee football games on film. He began the first MTSU football and basketball networks working closely with football coach Charles “Bubber” Murphy and basketball coach Ed Diddle Jr. In 1961, young Crockett moved from radio to television and was appointed news director at WSIX-TV (now WKRN) in Nashville where he covered many major news events throughout the United States and in Latin America as the ABC Network’s special assignment producer. A professional in his field, Crockett was elected president of the Tennessee Chapter of Sigma Delta Chi Journalism Society.

• Monte Hale Sr.: Hale was born in West Virginia, growing up as the son of a coal miner who spent many years digging out a living for his family. Understanding the perils and hard work his father endured as a coal miner, Hale decided to develop his radio voice, seeking a future in broadcast journalism. After graduating from high school, Hale ventured north, where he attended and graduated from Northwestern Radio School in Chicago. Fresh out of school, Hale worked at a couple of radio stations before moving to McMinnville, Tennessee, where he continued his radio career. After a brief period in McMinnville, Hale moved to Murfreesboro and was hired by WGNS Radio, where he worked as a sports announcer for many years. His voice could be heard on 1450 AM calling both high school and college games. Hale was also the voice of the MTSU Blue Raiders from 1961-1980. Later he became the first voice of the Nashville Sounds baseball team. For his outstanding support and tireless commitment to MTSU, the university named the Murphy Center basketball arena in his honor in 1983 and he was named to the MTSU Athletic Hall of Fame two years earlier. Hale succumbed to cancer in 1982 at age 42.MTSU Wordmark

• John D. Hood: Hood began his journalism career at Murfreesboro’s WGNS Radio in 1948 working as a staff announcer until 1954. In 1956 he became news and program manager for WMTS, another local radio station and served in this capacity through 1960. Developing a way with words and developing his skills as a people person, Hood continued to be a voice of the community in many ways. Throughout his career, he has served as a personnel manager, bank vice president, a Tennessee Representative and presently serves as director of government and community affairs for Middle Tennessee State University, where he holds both a bachelor’s and master’s degree and is known to many as “Mr. MTSU.”  A U.S. Army veteran, Hood served in the Army Security Agency and 74th Regimental Combat Team at Fort Devens, Massachusetts. He’s considered by many as an ambassador for Murfreesboro-Rutherford County. Very active in the community, Hood was past president of the Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce, a member of the Murfreesboro School Board, former member of the old Quarterly Court, now County Commission, and he was named Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce Business Legend of the Year in 2014.

• Demetria Kalodimos: Kalodimos is the longest continuous evening news anchor in WSMV history and has consistently been voted a favorite in local reader polls, according to WSMV.com. She started at WSMV in 1984 and has made her mark as a skilled reporter and anchor. Known for her investigative skills, Kalodimos has won 15 Emmy Awards, two National Headliner Awards, two Investigative Reporters and Editors National Awards, The Edward R. Murrow Award for Investigative Reporting and two National Citations from American Women in Radio and Television. In 1996, she was chosen as the Tennessee Associated Press Broadcaster of the Year. Kalodimos is also known for her community service, including her work with the Nashville Rescue Mission, MS Society, the Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, and many other nonprofit organizations, according to the station’s website.

• Darrell Patterson: A native of Athens, Tennessee, where he started his broadcasting career in 1965 at WLAR radio at the young age of 16, Patterson worked the 5-9 a.m. sign-on shift while participating in the local high school’s industrial cooperative training program. He worked as an on-air disc jockey, news and sports director, broadcasting McMinn County High School and Tennessee Wesleyan College games until moving to WDOD in Chattanooga in 1973 as a DJ and news and sports director broadcasting UTC basketball and football games. Later he transitioned to television in June 1975, moving to WTVC-TV as sports director anchoring the nightly sportscasts. Patterson was inducted into the Greater Chattanooga Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2004. He retired from broadcasting after 48 years in December 2013.

Members of the 2016 Class of the Tennessee Journalism Hall of Fame are shown following the Dec. 8 induction ceremony at the Murfreesboro Association of Realtors Training Center on Butler Drive. Shown, from left, are Monte Hale Jr. on behalf of posthumous inductee and longtime radio announcer Monte Hale Sr.; Demetria Kalodimos, news anchor at WSMV-TV Channel 4 News in Nashville; Tom Britt, news anchor for WBBJ-TV 7 Eyewitness News in Jackson, Tenn.; Hudley Crockett of Nashville, a former news director, anchor and producer for WSIX-TV (now WKRN) and former press secretary for Tennessee Gov. Buford Ellington; Darrell Patterson of Chattanooga, retired sports director and anchor for WTVC-TV Channel 9; and MTSU alumnus John Hood, former state representative and WGNS Radio announcer. (Submitted photo)

Members of the 2016 Class of the Tennessee Journalism Hall of Fame are shown following the Dec. 8 induction ceremony at the Murfreesboro Association of Realtors Training Center on Butler Drive. From left are Monte Hale Jr., accepting on behalf of his father, posthumous inductee and longtime radio announcer Monte Hale Sr.; Demetria Kalodimos, news anchor at WSMV-TV Channel 4 News in Nashville; Tom Britt, news anchor for WBBJ-TV 7 Eyewitness News in Jackson, Tenn.; Hudley Crockett of Nashville, a former news director, anchor and producer for then-WSIX-TV and former press secretary for Tennessee Gov. Buford Ellington; Darrell Patterson of Chattanooga, retired sports director and anchor for WTVC-TV Channel 9; and MTSU alumnus John Hood, former state representative and WGNS Radio announcer. (Submitted photo)

 

Dec. 28’s the deadline to nominate MTSU Unity Luncheon honorees

Middle Tennessee residents now have more time to help thank and honor neighbors who’ve spent their lives dedicated to the greater good.

4 hands unity luncheon graphic croppedMTSU’s Black History Month Committee has expanded the deadline to submit nominees for its annual Unity Luncheon awards to Wednesday, Dec. 28. Nominations may be submitted at www.mtsu.edu/aahm/unity-awards.php.

The Unity Luncheon, an MTSU tradition since 1996, occurs during the university’s annual celebration of Black History Month each February. The event honors unsung heroes who are 60 years of age or older, have lived in Middle Tennessee for 25 years or more and who have made outstanding contributions to their community.

You can see a list of previous Unity Award recipients here.

Awards are presented in categories of education, community service, civility, excellence in sports and contributions to black arts. Nominations may be submitted in one category only.

The 2017 Unity Awards Luncheon is scheduled for Feb. 16 in MTSU’s Student Union Ballroom. Advance ticket information is available at www.mtsu.edu/aahm.

For more information, contact Daniel Green, director of MTSU’s Office of Intercultural and Diversity Affairs and chair of the MTSU Black History Month Committee, at 615-898-5812 or daniel.green@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

WMOT/Roots Radio to broadcast Dec. 17 ‘Mountain Tough’ benefit concert

WMOT/Roots Radio 89.5 FM will be the flagship live broadcaster for Saturday’s free benefit concert to help those affected by the fatal Smoky Mountain wildfires that ravaged parts of the Gatlinburg, Tennessee, area in late November.

All this week, artists and radio stations have been signing on to support “Mountain Tough,” an all-day, free outdoor musical celebration and fundraiser that will be held from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. EST Saturday, Dec. 17, at 705 Parkway in Gatlinburg.WMOT-new web logo

The full show will be carried by flagship broadcaster WMOT/Roots Radio 89.5 FM (www.wmot.org), which serves Middle Tennessee from the College of Media and Entertainment at Middle Tennessee State University. The show is being produced by Yee-Haw Brewing Co., Ole Smoky Moonshine, Music City Roots and the Gatlinburg Convention and Visitors Bureau.

The word went out on social media Wednesday just after noon from Zac Brown BandGatlinburg, Tennessee, is open for business & welcoming visitors! We’ll be there playing the #MountainTough Benefit Show this Saturday, December 17. You can donate to ongoing fire relief efforts here: http://bit.ly/DonateETF.

Most importantly, in addition to Zac Brown Band, the talent lineup continues to take shape, organizers said. Nationally renowned duo The Secret Sisters signed on within the last 48 hours. Other artists committed include Sam Bush, Jason D. Williams, Derek St. Holmes, Jim Lauderdale, Chuck Mead, Rob Ickes & Trey Hensley, Shannon Whitworth & Barrett Smith, Sarah Potenza, Firewater Junction, Greg Reish, Chelle Rose, Carl Anderson, R.B. Morris and Mo Pitney.

Zac Brown Band will take the stage last around 7:50 p.m. EST Saturday.

While the benefit is free, donations are encouraged, with all proceeds going to the Sevier County Community Fund. To make a contribution, visit https://etf.givingfuel.com/sevier-county-community-fund.

Donations can also be sent by checks payable to East Tennessee Foundation with “SCCF” in the memo line. Mail to: East Tennessee Foundation, 520 W. Summit Hill Drive, Suite 1101, Knoxville, TN 37902.

Other stations committed to broadcast or stream Mountain Tough include: Knoxville country powerhouse WIVK-FM, Knoxville indie/Americana station WDVX-FM, Nashville public radio station WPLN-FM, University of Tennessee stations WUTK-FM and WUOT-FM and Chattanooga’s WUTC-FM.

In addition, NPR Music-affiliated World Café and the VuHaus digital music video service will host the video stream of the show produced and served by Music City Roots of Nashville.

You can follow the concert via social Media: #mountaintough, @TravelGburg, @zacbrownband, @olesmoky, @yeehawbrewing, @musiccityroots and @wmot_rootsradio.

WMOT-FM/Roots Radio 89.5 is a 100,000-watt NPR affiliated radio station serving Middle Tennessee from the College of Media and Entertainment, owned and operated by Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. It has served the Midstate since 1969, and in September 2016 it adopted a full-time Americana music format with a Nashville focus branded as Roots Radio.

With live DJs from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. on weekdays and a range of specialty programming on nights and weekends, its mission is to reflect the ongoing evolution of Music City and its American roots traditions. Learn more at www.wmot.org.

Artists create tiny Tennessee Christmases at MTSU for D.C. tree

Two dozen young Midstate artists’ unique visions  are on display, with help from MTSU students, as Tennessee’s state Christmas tree shines brightly alongside the National Christmas Tree in Washington, D.C., through the end of December.

MTSU senior Sarah Mahmud, left, a health administration major from Hendersonville, Tennessee, applies a seal on a Midstate artist's holiday creation during the recent VSA Tennessee ornament-making workshop at the university. The ornaments, prepared by young artists with disabilities, will be displayed on the Tennessee state tree alongside the National Christmas Tree in Washington, D.C., beginning Dec. 1.

MTSU senior Sarah Mahmud, left, a health administration major from Hendersonville, Tennessee, applies a seal on a Midstate artist’s holiday creation during the VSA Tennessee ornament-making workshop at the university. The ornaments, prepared by young artists with disabilities, are displayed on the Tennessee state tree alongside the National Christmas Tree in Washington, D.C., beginning Dec. 1. (MTSU photo by Eric Sutton)

Participants in the VSA Tennessee program crafted the festive folk ornaments on a decidedly non-wintry afternoon, but a Yule log fire, a wisecracking Santa and holiday stockings and sweaters inside MTSU’s Ingram Building made the brief but boisterous workshop creatively delightful for the artists and their supporters.

Those supporters included friends and family members alongside MTSU professor Lori Kissinger and her EXL Organizational Communications in Communities students, who once again coordinated the project from beginning to end.

Kissinger also directs VSA Tennessee, the state organization on arts and disability that was established at MTSU. It’s also an affiliate of VSA, the international organization on arts and disabilities founded in 1974 by Ambassador Jean Kennedy Smith and formerly known as Very Special Arts.

Lori Kissinger

Lori Kissinger

“This ORCO 3250 class voted unanimously to make this event more than just making ornaments,” Kissinger said of her experiential learning students.

“They arranged for the decorations, the photo booth, the extra ‘make and take’ ornaments, stockings and the refreshments. They’ve done a great job!”

Yvette Cowden of Nashville, who’s worked with VSA Tennessee as a teaching artist for several years, provided the artistic direction for this year’s ornament project, an Appalachian folk-inspired design.

Each of the ornaments is filled with pinecones, musical instruments, ribbons, buttons, burlap, rolled paper, feathers, beads and more and will be protected by and viewed through its plastic globe’s unpainted side as it hangs on the Tennessee tree in Washington.

“It’s a fairly simple design. You just use your hands and your imagination and have fun,” Cowden said as the young artists inspected and collected items from the selection of supplies, already mentally planning their creations.

VSA Tennessee logo webJudy Boyd of Murfreesboro looked on with a smile as her son, longtime craftsman Adam “A.J.” Boyd, consulted with his artist’s assistant for the afternoon, MTSU freshman Dillon Koenig of Cleveland, Tennessee.

Amid their happily noisy surroundings, the men discussed which supplies would have the best impact on Adam Boyd’s design.

“He is a crafty guy,” Judy Boyd said. “He’s participated in a lot of events with VSA. Whenever Lori (Kissinger) has a project that he’s interested in, he goes and does it.”

Koenig said he and his organizational communication classmates were determined to make the event a special one for the visiting artists.

“We took a class vote and everybody immediately said ‘YES!’” Koenig, a freshman majoring in public relations, explained. “We didn’t know what it entailed at first, but it’s been really exciting to see what we’re all doing together.”

Two of the special ornaments prepared during the recent VSA Tennessee ornament-making workshop at MTSU await packing for shipment to Washington, D.C., where they’ll be displayed on the Tennessee state tree alongside the National Christmas Tree beginning Dec. 1. (Photo courtesy of Lori Kissinger)

Two of the special ornaments prepared during the VSA Tennessee ornament-making workshop at MTSU await packing for shipment to Washington, D.C., where they’ll be displayed on the Tennessee state tree alongside the National Christmas Tree through the end of December. (Photo courtesy of Lori Kissinger)

Kissinger’s students regularly help with logistics for VSA events as part of her experiential learning classes, coordinating events like the annual Tennessee VSA Young Soloist Competition and the “Golden Ratio Project,” an international arts education exchange performance.

The VSA Tennessee artists’ ornaments will once again become part of a now 94-year-old tradition of celebrating Christmas with a national tree in the nation’s capital.

Every year, one-of-a-kind ornaments are made by Americans to hang on the 56 trees — one for every U.S. state, territory and the District of Columbia — that surround the National Christmas tree.

All the trees will be on display through the end of December on the Ellipse in President’s Park.

To learn more about the work of VSA Tennessee, visit www.vsatn.org or contact Kissinger at userk7706@comcast.net. You can learn more about the national Christmas tree at www.thenationaltree.org.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU senior Ashley Brannom, left, an organizational communication major from Tullahoma, Tennessee, applies a seal on a Midstate artist's holiday creation during the recent VSA Tennessee ornament-making workshop at the university.

MTSU senior Ashley Brannom, left, an organizational communication major from Tullahoma, Tennessee, applies a seal on a Midstate artist’s holiday creation during the VSA Tennessee ornament-making workshop at the university. (MTSU photo by Eric Sutton)

Artist Adam “A.J.” Boyd of Murfreesboro, right, inspects his work in progress while MTSU freshman Dillon Koenig of Cleveland, Tennessee, acts as artist’s assistant during the VSA Tennessee ornament-making workshop at the university.

Artist Adam “A.J.” Boyd of Murfreesboro, right, inspects his work in progress while MTSU freshman Dillon Koenig of Cleveland, Tennessee, acts as artist’s assistant during the VSA Tennessee ornament-making workshop at the university. (MTSU photo by Eric Sutton)

City Schools students experience MTSU via Education Day [+VIDEO]

Scales Elementary School classmates and friends Alaynna Edging and Jenna Woods knew there was some educational value to attending the fifth annual MTSU Education Day game for 12 Murfreesboro City Schools.

When asked, Edging said she “learned to have fun. This has been fun and entertaining.” Woods, also 11, “learned that the Blue Raider girls can make a lot of their shots.” Secretly, what they loved was the front-row view — “VIP seats,” as Edging called them.

Many of the 7,100 youngsters answered MTSU MTeach math questions. But in addition to the game, it was a whole lot more fun as they watched fellow students build a snowman, wrapping toilet paper around their teachers; see their classmates shake, jump and more as they participated in “Jingle in the Trunk;” and play other holiday-themed activities on the court.

While Ohio (4-0) emerged a 73-52 winner in front of 11,222 fans, Education Day has become an event — “an all-day recess” as John Pittard Elementary School teacher Carla Calvin put it — that may have far-reaching implications as the first- through eighth-graders spent time on a university campus attending a women’s basketball game.

Discovery School students and teachers, part of the total crowd of 11,222 fans, cheer on the Lady Raiders Nov. 30 in Murphy Center. MTSU fell 73-52 to the Ohio Bobcats. (MTSU photos by Andy Heidt)

Discovery School students and teachers, part of the total crowd of 11,222 fans, cheer on the Lady Raiders Nov. 30 in Murphy Center. MTSU fell 73-52 to the Ohio Bobcats. (MTSU photos by Andy Heidt)

“Forty or 50 years ago, I saw a game and it wasn’t called Education Day back then, but I developed a passion for the sport and now I am the coach at MTSU,” Rick Insell said. “Maybe somebody sitting in the stands will become the next Pat Summitt (the late hall of fame University of Tennessee coach).”

“Some child, probably sitting in those seats, who’s got a big dream, may become a basketball player, a coach or something affiliated with MTSU,” added Insell, who said he arrived at Murphy Center at 4 a.m. and marveled that city and campus police already were setting up for the 11 a.m. game.

Calvin, who teaches fourth-graders at a school that brought 800 students to the game, said it gives the youngsters the experience of visiting campus and socializing.

“Some of them may live around the corner (from MTSU), but have never entered this building,” Calvin said. “It is a day away from school. They get to learn how to be social with friends.”

Linda Gilbert, Murfreesboro City Schools director and an MTSU alumna with three degrees, praised her teachers, staff, bus drivers and others, “welcoming them with their smiles, providing safety, guiding them to participatory spots, ensuring a healthy environment, encouraging them to have fun … and helping them see opportunities for their future.”

At times, the noise inside Murphy Center was deafening. Especially when an Ohio Bobcat stepped to the free-throw line. Then it became a really loud crowd.

Other schools attending the game included Black Fox, Bradley Academy, Cason Lane, Discovery School, Erma Siegel, Hobgood Elementary, Mitchell-Neilson, Northfield, Overall Creek and Reeves Rogers.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Students from seven Murfreesboro City Schools "build a snowman," wrapping their teachers in toilet paper during a first-half break in the action during the MTSU-Ohio women's college basketball game Nov. 30 in Murphy Center.

Students from seven Murfreesboro City Schools “build a snowman,” wrapping their teachers in toilet paper during a first-half break in the action during the MTSU-Ohio women’s college basketball game Nov. 30 in Murphy Center.

Bradley Academy's girls' basketball players and coaches welcome the Lady Raiders onto the court with high fives.

Bradley Academy’s girls’ basketball players and coaches welcome the Lady Raiders onto the court with high fives.

Murfreesboro City Schools' teachers sing the national anthem before the start of the MTSU Lady Raiders-Ohio Bobcats women's game Nov. 30 in Murphy Center. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Murfreesboro City Schools’ teachers sing the national anthem before the start of the MTSU Lady Raiders-Ohio Bobcats women’s game Nov. 30 in Murphy Center.

MTSU’s new Chinese Music Ensemble takes stage for Friday concert

Students from MTSU’s inaugural Chinese Music Ensemble course will put their talents on display in a unique concert performance.

Chinese Music Ensemble fall2016 poster web

Click on the poster to learn more about MTSU’s Center for Chinese Music and Culture and the new Chinese Music Ensemble.

The MTSU Center for Chinese Music and Culture will present the MTSU Chinese Music Ensemble’s first semester-end concert at 3 p.m. Friday, Dec. 2, at the center, located in Suite 1600 of the Miller Education Center, 503 Bell St. in Murfreesboro. This event is free and open to the public.

A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Off-campus visitors attending the daytime event should obtain a special one-day permit from MTSU’s Office of Parking and Transportation at www.mtsu.edu/parking/visit.php.

Dr. Mei Han

Dr. Mei Han

“Throughout the semester, the ensemble members have learned Chinese bamboo wind instruments and various pluck and bowed-string instruments,” said Dr. Mei Han, center director and an associate professor of music.

Beginning with the fall 2016 semester, the Chinese Music Ensemble has been offered as a special topics course to all students. The instructors are professors and graduate students from the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing, China, and instruments are provided.

Registration requires permission from Han and the MTSU School of Music.

“Together with their Chinese teachers, the concert will bring a new musical and cultural experience to the audience,” Han said.

For more information, contact Han at 615-898-5718 or mei.han@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU’s Lavinia Project gives violence survivors a voice at Dec. 1 event

Survivors of sexual assault and domestic violence will express themselves through creative writing thanks to an intriguing MTSU endeavor set Thursday, Dec. 1.

Matthew Brown

Dr. Matthew Brown

The Lavinia Project will conduct an end-of-semester reading of original literature and live music at 7 p.m. Dec. 1 at Just Love Coffee Roasters, 129 E. MTCS Road in Murfreesboro.

The event is free and open to the public.

Dr. Matthew Brown, a lecturer in the Department of English, started the Lavinia Project with an MTSU student after conducting workshops at a local women’s and children’s crisis center.

“The ultimate goal or mission of The Lavinia Project is to use writing and the arts to humanize and legitimize the experiences of survivors of domestic and sexual violence, and thus to begin to tilt the discussion that surrounds these issues toward prevention and deterrence of abusive behavior,” reads a statement on the project’s Facebook page.lavinia-project-logo_web

Brown, a published poet, is co-founder of Writers’ Corps, a group of student-veterans who publish their personal expressions in an annual literary magazine called DMZ.

In working with the veterans, Brown said he realized that writing poems, essays and short stories had a therapeutic effect for many of them.

“I found that much of my research while composing my dissertation on the psychological, physiological, neurocognitive and social effects of trauma, as well as the benefits of expressive writing therapy, that the heart of the research in this field lies in the domain of studying rape,” said Brown.

For more information, contact Brown at 615-898-2503 or matthew.brown@mtsu.edu or thelaviniaproject@gmail.com, or visit www.facebook.com/TheLaviniaProject.

Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

‘MTSU On the Record’ goes behind ‘Joys’ scenes with chorale director

A recent edition of the “MTSU On the Record” radio program explained all the hard work that goes into one of the holiday season’s most entertaining performances.

Angela Tipps

Angela Tipps

Click on the poster for a link to purchase "Joys of the Season" tickets.

Click on the poster for a link to purchase “Joys of the Season” tickets.

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Angela Tipps, director of the MTSU Women’s Chorale and a lecturer in the School of Music, first aired Nov. 21 on WMOT-FM/Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org. You can listen to their conversation below.

The Women’s Chorale is one of the groups involved in “Joys of the Season,” a concert showcasing sacred and secular music, dance, theater and art for the entire family.

The event is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1, at MTSU’s Tucker Theatre.

“I have a number of friends who are choral music educators in high schools and I come visit with them,” said Tipps. “When potential MTSU students audition for the School of Music, I’ll be in touch with them to talk about the Women’s Chorale, so when they come to MTSU, they know that’s an available opportunity.”

“Joys of the Season” tickets are available at www.mtsuarts.com or 888-71-TICKET (888-718-4253). A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

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