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‘MTSU On the Record’ helps ACE Learning Center ‘Saddle Up’

Helping children develop properly in their formative years is the topic of the next “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Christy Davis, director of the Ann Campbell Early Learning Center, will air from 5:30 to 6 p.m. Monday, July 18, and from 8 to 8:30 a.m. Sunday, July 24, on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org).

Christy Davis

Christy Davis

Saddle Up 2016 graphic web

This year marks the 10th anniversary of “Saddle Up!,” the center’s major annual fundraising event, which is slated for 5:30 to 8 p.m. Saturday, July 29, at Murphy Center.

“We’re going to make it family-friendly,” said Davis. “We’ll have a magician. Discovery Center will have animals. We’ll have puppet-making … science activities, a horse-grooming station … a giant coloring book.”

The ACE Learning Center, formerly known as Project HELP, gives young children with and without developmental delays a head start on life by helping them develop good motor skills, social abilities, cognitive abilities and communication skills.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information, contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

‘MTSU On the Record’ guest considers jazz’s effect on fashion, culture

The impact of avant-garde jazz on five decades of fashion is the subject of the next “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. Rick Cottle

Dr. Rick Cottle

Jazz greats Miles Davis, top left, and Wayne Shorter are dapper in suits and ties during a 1964 performance in Berlin, Germany, while jazz genius John Coltrane, top right, makes notes during the 1964 recording session for "A Love Supreme." Boxer and activist Muhammad Ali, center, smiles while visiting Zaire before his 1974 bout with George Foreman, and rappers Jay-Z, lower left, and Kanye West perform in Madison Square Garden in New York City in 2007. (Photos by JazzSign/Lebrecht Music & Arts/Corbis, Chuck Stewart, Howard L. Bingham, and Scott Gries/Getty Images)

Jazz greats Miles Davis, top left, and Wayne Shorter wear suits and ties during a 1964 performance in Berlin, Germany, while jazz genius John Coltrane, top right, makes notes sans tie during the 1964 recording session for “A Love Supreme.” Boxer and activist Muhammad Ali wears a dashiki in the center photo while visiting Zaire before his 1974 bout with George Foreman. In the third photo, hip-hop artist-entrepreneurs Jay-Z, left, and Kanye West perform in Madison Square Garden in New York City in 2007. (Photos by JazzSign/Lebrecht Music & Arts/Corbis, Chuck Stewart, Howard L. Bingham, and Scott Gries/Getty Images)

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Rick Cottle, an assistant professor of textiles, merchandising and design at MTSU, first aired from 5:30 to 6 p.m. Monday, July 11, and will re-air from 8 to 8:30 a.m. Sunday, July 17, on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ).

Cottle co-authored “From Suits to Robes,” an examination of avant-garde jazz music’s impact on fashion, for the academic journal “Fashion, Style and Popular Culture” with his son, Adam, of Savannah State University, and Dr. Thomas Bell of Kansas State University.

The authors maintain that the unique jazz stylings of artists such as Miles Davis and John Coltrane influenced more Afrocentric clothing styles in the 1960s and 1970s that corresponded with black liberation political movements of the period.

They further assert that these fashion statements also influence the hip-hop and rap music generation.

“Why, all of a sudden did (jazz musicians) go from dark suits, white shirts, black ties in the Fifties … to the dashikis … and African-inspired colors?” said Cottle.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

MTSU on WGNS: MALA, ‘Saddle Up’ event and new leadership training

MTSU faculty and staff took to the radio recently to share information about a new, flexible master’s program, an upcoming fundraiser for a childhood learning center and a new workforce leadership program for those already on the job.

The details were shared during the June 20 “Action Line” program with host Bart Walker. The live program was broadcast on FM 100.5, 101.9 and AM 1450 from the WGNS studio in downtown Murfreesboro. If you missed it, you can listen to a podcast of the show here.

Guests included:

MTSU faculty and staff appeared on the Monday, June 20, “Action Line” program on WGNS Radio. Guests were, at top from left, Drs. Peggy Carpenter and David Gotcher, University College; bottom right, Dr. Dawn McCormack, College of Liberal Arts; and bottom left, Christy Davis, ACE Learning Center. (MTSU photo illustration)

• Dr. Dawn McCormack, director of the College of Liberal Arts’ Master of Arts in Liberal Arts (MALA) degree program, discussed the growth of this new flexible degree.

MALA allows students to develop skills and expand knowledge in subjects they’re most passionate about pursuing. The program allowing anyone with a bachelor’s degree to earn a graduate degree through a course of study built around subjects they find most captivating.

For more information, email mala@mtsu.edu, 615-898-5986 or visit www.mtsu.edu/mala.

• Christy Davis, new director of the ACE Learning Center at MTSU, discussed the center’s upcoming major fundraiser, which will be more family friendly this year.

The Ann Campbell Early Learning Center, or ACE, is getting ready for its 10th annual “Saddle Up for ACE Learning Center” fundraiser set for 5:30-8 p.m. Friday, July 29, at MTSU’s Murphy Center.

Food will be available from Chick-fil-A, Kroger, Newk’s, Purity Dairies, Publix and more. There will be activities for kids such as a magician, live bee observatory, sensory stations, animals from Discovery Center, horse grooming, straw maze, gigantic coloring book, and more.

For more information, including how to get tickets, go here.

• Dr. David Gotcher, interim dean of MTSU University College, and Dr. Peggy Carpenter, assistant dean of academic outreach for University College, discussed the new Applied Leadership Concentration launching in the fall targeting those already in the workforce.

Working with leading tire and rubber company Bridgestone Americas, MTSU has created the new Applied Leadership certificate program. Bridgestone employees will be among the inaugural group of students in the program, which offers adult learners already on the job a chance to earn additional job certifications — and even a bachelor’s degree — through online courses and short, intensive on-campus instruction.

Read the full story here.

Students, faculty and staff who are interested in guesting on WGNS to promote their MTSU-related activities should contact Jimmy Hart, director of news and media relations, at 615-898-5131 or via email at jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu.

Raptor team’s MTSU talk leaves lasting impression [+VIDEO]

After listening and watching the U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor demonstration team discuss their careers and the power of the stealth aircraft, MTSU senior Mohammed Alzahrani called it “just impressive.”

“Exciting” is how local high school senior Taylor Cowan of Murfreesboro labeled the one-hour-plus presentation by five of the 13-member Raptor flight demonstration team Friday, June 3, at MTSU.

With about 100 people in attendance, including nearly 45 members of area Tennessee Wing Civil Air Patrol composite squadrons for teenagers, Raptor team members left quite an impression on adults and young people alike.

https://youtu.be/zhJgkgRRF2o

The Raptors, who spoke in the Business and Aerospace Building’s State Farm Lecture Hall, are in Rutherford County for the 2016 Great Tennessee Airshow Saturday and Sunday, June 4-5, at Smyrna Airport.

The U.S. Navy Blue Angels were to appear at MTSU, but the group canceled all airshow-related appearances after a June 2 crash that killed U.S. Marine pilot Capt. Jeff Kuss, a Durango, Colorado, native.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Steven Davison, left, and senior airman/weapons specialist Kyara Johnson smile as they listen to a woman discuss their visit to MTSU June 3. Davison and Johnson are part of a 13-member F-22 Raptor team in the area for the Great Tennessee Airshow June 4-5 at Smyrna. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Steven Davison, left, and senior airman/weapons specialist Kyara Johnson smile as they listen to a guest discuss their visit to MTSU June 3. Davison and Johnson are part of a 13-member F-22 Raptor team in the area for the Great Tennessee Airshow June 4-5 at Smyrna. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

Before the Raptor presentation, a moment of silence was held to honor Kuss “for his service to our nation,” said Andrew Oppmann, MTSU vice president of marketing and communications.

Attending Raptor members included:

  • Jonathan Billie, a technical sergeant and spokesman.
  • Steven Davison, a staff sergeant and avionics specialist.
  • DJ Foss, a demonstration pilot.
  • Mahalia Frost, a public affairs officer.
  • Kyara Johnson, a senior airman and weapons specialist who grew up in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Raptor demo teams are known for performing precision aerial maneuvers to demonstrate the unique capabilities of the F-22, which is the world’s only operational fifth-generation fighter aircraft capable at flying at great speeds and altitudes.

The presenters showed video of Dan Dickinson, the scheduled Smyrna airshow demonstration pilot, who was unable to attend because of air show commitments. Dickinson said he has a “special spot in his heart for ROTC cadets. I encourage you to press forward. … It’s an awesome path and opportunity.”

MTSU offers military science in the College of Basic and Applied Sciences and annually produces an outstanding group of ROTC cadets.

Alzahrani, 24, an aerospace professional pilot major from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, said attending the presentation “has been a great experience … to know about their lives, what everyone’s duty is and learn about the air show this weekend.”

Cowan, who is a home-schooled student, is a member of the Civil Air Patrol Smyrna Composite Squadron and an aspiring pilot. Cowan won’t be able to attend the air show because of an encampment activity.

U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor demonstration pilot DJ Foss explains about the speed and power of the aircraft appearing at the Great Tennessee Airshow June 4-5 in Smyrna, Tennessee. The Raptor team spoke at MTSU June 3.

U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor demonstration pilot DJ Foss explains the speed and power of the aircraft appearing at the Great Tennessee Airshow June 4-5 in Smyrna, Tennessee. The Raptor team spoke at MTSU June 3.

“I’m definitely interested in flying, so being here has helped me learn more about it,” Cowan said. “It was good to know their side of things and how much they enjoy it. It made me regret that I’m not going to make it to the air show.”

Other composite squadrons attending included cadet squadrons from Murfreesboro, Nashville and Williamson County.

Foss told the attentive audience that enemy pilots usually don’t detect the combat-ready Raptors until it’s too late.

“We see him long before he knows we are there,” he said.

The team fielded questions from audience members. Billie, who said they enjoy “Heritage Flights,” which pair the F-22s with World War II-type aircraft, noted that he and his colleagues were amazed by several of the teenagers’ detailed questions.

MTSU is the presenting sponsor of the Raptor team’s appearance at the airshow. The Department of Aerospace will have an information booth and aircraft display set up at the Smyrna event.

Raptor air show demonstrations include the power loop, split and tail side as well as a high-speed pass and dedication pass. The maneuvers are based on those designed for combat operations, but performed at much lower altitudes than most pilots are certified to attain.

For more on aerospace’s unique programs — including professional pilot, air traffic control, and unmanned aircraft systems — visit www.mtsu.edu/programs/aerospace.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor demonstration pilot DJ Foss, right, fields audience questions during the team's visit to MTSU June 3. Listening are fellow team members Kyara Johnson, Steven Davison and Jonathan Billie.

U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor demonstration pilot DJ Foss, right, fields audience questions during the team’s visit to MTSU June 3. Listening are fellow team members Kyara Johnson, Steven Davison and Jonathan Billie.

U.S. Air Force tech sergeant Jonathan Billie explains about maneuverability and other aspects of the F-22 Raptor while speaking June 3 in the Business and Aerospace Building's State Farm Lecture Hall.

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Jonathan Billie explains about maneuverability and other aspects of the F-22 Raptor while speaking June 3 in the Business and Aerospace Building’s State Farm Lecture Hall.

MTSU on WGNS: Simulator facility, STEM survey, black history

MTSU faculty and staff took to the radio recently to discuss the dedication of a new flight simulator building and new weather software, results from a STEM workforce survey and a new online resource to help preserve African-American historical sites.

Details were shared during the May 16 WGNS Radio “Action Line” program with host Bart Walker. The live program was broadcast on FM 100.5, 101.9 and AM 1450 from the station’s downtown Murfreesboro studio. If you missed it, you can listen to a podcast of the show here.

  • MTSU aerospace graduate student Leland Waite, left, faculty member Don Crews, interim chair Wendy Beckman and faculty member Jerry Hill discuss the department's newly dedicated flight simulator building and weather software students will begin utilizing in the fall during their May 16 segment on the WGNS radio "Action Line" program. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

    MTSU aerospace graduate student Leland Waite, left, faculty member Don Crews, interim chair Wendy Beckman and faculty member Jerry Hill discuss the department’s newly dedicated flight simulator building and weather software that students will begin utilizing in the fall during their May 16 segment on the WGNS radio “Action Line” program. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

    Dr. Wendy Beckman, interim chair of the Department of Aerospace, faculty members Jerry Hill and Don Crews and graduate student Leland Waite. They discussed the $700,000 simulator building dedicated May 5 at Murfreesboro Airport and weather software.

The 3,600-gross-square-foot facility features a classroom, six briefing rooms, bathrooms and infrastructure to support spaces. It joins other MTSU Flight Operations Center airport facilities. Find the full story here.

Aerospace also has received an aviation operations management solution, WSI Fusion, in the Business and Aerospace Building simulation lab. Students will graduate with a competitive advantage because it is not available at most aviation schools. Find the full story here.

  • Dr. Murat Arik , director of the MTSU Business and Economic and Research Center, or BERC, and graduate student Katherine Stubblefield. They discussed the results of a STEM workforce survey conducted last fall by BERC.
Murfreesboro's Dee Butler, left, whose family lives on a century farm, and Dr. Antoinette Van Zelm of the MTSU Center for Historic Preservation, promote "Preserving African-American Historic Places: Suggestions and Sources." (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

Murfreesboro’s Dee Butler, left, whose family lives on a century farm, and Dr. Antoinette Van Zelm of the MTSU Center for Historic Preservation, promote “Preserving African-American Historic Places: Suggestions and Sources.”

A survey of businesses, mayors, local economic development officials, and school principals suggests that Tennessee faces significant challenges in the STEM workforce supply, pipeline and infrastructure, the report states.

Among the BERC’s key survey findings is that Tennessee faces an employment and skills gap in STEM areas. As of 2013, the size of the STEM workforce in Tennessee was an estimated 324,328, but the report characterized that workforce as “an oversupply of a low-skilled STEM workforce relative to the U.S. average.” An additional 16,000 jobs could be created by upgrading the STEM skill set of the current workforce. Find the full story here.

  • Dr. Antoinette Van Zelm, assistant director of MTSU’s Center for Historic Preservation, and Dee Butler, whose family has a Rutherford County Century Farm. They discussed a new online resource to help preserve African-American historical sites.

“Preserving African-American Historic Places: Suggestions and Sources” is an omnibus online site with information on collections care, museum management, heritage tourism and fundraising. You can find it here.

One example of a site the CHP already has helped to preserve is Griggs Hall, the first building constructed in 1923 on Nashville’s American Baptist College’s campus.

Other potential preservation sites include businesses, cemeteries, churches, farms, homes, neighborhoods and lodges. Find the full story here.

Students, faculty and staff who are interested in guesting on WGNS to promote their MTSU-related activities should contact Jimmy Hart, director of news and media relations, at 615-898-5131 or via email at jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu.

— Jimmy Hart (Jimmy.Hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU Business and Economic Research Center director Murat Arik, left, and graduate student Katherine Stubblefield reveal results from BERC's STEM workforce survey.

MTSU Business and Economic Research Center director Murat Arik, left, and graduate student Katherine Stubblefield reveal results from BERC’s STEM workforce survey.

MTSU on WGNS: Lifelong Learning, migrant exhibit, women’s expo

MTSU faculty and staff took to the radio recently to discuss an upcoming series of classes open to the community, an ongoing exhibit about Midstate migrants and an upcoming showcase targeting women entrepreneurs.

The details were shared during the April 18 “Action Line” program with host Scott Walker. The live program was broadcast on FM 100.5, 101.9 and AM 1450 from the WGNS studio in downtown Murfreesboro. If you missed it, you can listen to a podcast of the show here.

Guests included:

MTSU guests for the April 18 WGNS "Action Line" program are, top left, from left, students Joy Rogers, Dalton Cantrell, Mia Kozul, Sam Hulsey and Global Stuies professor Dr. Antonia Vasquez; at right, Connie Huddleston, College of Liberal Arts; bottom right, from left, small business owners Latoya Bennett, Shalonda Brown and Meichelle Gibson. (MTSU photo illustration)

MTSU guests for the April 18 WGNS “Action Line” program are, top left, from left, students Joy Rogers, Dalton Cantrell, Mia Kozul, Sam Hulsey and Global Stuies professor Dr. Antonia Vasquez; at right, Connie Huddleston, College of Liberal Arts; bottom right, from left, small business owners Latoya Bennett, Shalonda Brown and Meichelle Gibson. (MTSU photo illustration)

• Connie Huddleston, coordinator for the College of Liberal Arts, discussed the College of Liberal Arts’ Lifelong Learning Program that starts up again in May.

The homework-free, exam-free classroom experience for older learners is slated for four Mondays — May 2, 9, 16 and 23 — in the Ingram Building, located at 2269 Middle Tennessee Blvd. in Murfreesboro.

Classes in “The Civil War” will take place from 9 to 10:30 a.m. “The History of American Sports” is slated for 10:45 a.m. to noon. “The Philosophy of Happiness” is scheduled for 12:15 to 1:45 p.m.

Learn more here.

• Dr. Antonio Vasquez, professor in the Global Studies and Cultural Geography program, and MTSU student Sam Hulsey, exhibit co-coordinator, along with students Mia Kozul, Dalton Cantrell and Joy Rogers.

The student-led “Migration with Dignity in Middle Tennessee” multimedia exhibit will be open through April 27 at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County, 225 W. College St. in downtown Murfreesboro.

Free and open to the public, the exhibit includes 17 individual testimonies of migrants and their families from different countries of origin who now all call Tennessee their home. Several pieces of student artwork from MTSU professor Sisavanh Houghton’s painting class, as well as video excerpts, are included in the exhibit.

Learn more here.

• Shalonda Brown, owner of The Couture Experience by Shalon (TCES); Latoya Bennett, owner of Ellie Colour wardrobe stylist firm; and Meichelle Gibson, co-owner of Gibson Consulting and Entertainment Group (GCEG), discuss the upcoming “Couture Experience Women in Business Showcase,” a free expo for women.

The showcase will be held from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 30, at the MT Center in the Sam H. Ingram Building on Middle Tennessee Boulevard. The event is part of MTSU’s celebration of National Women’s History Month and is being co-sponsored by the June Anderson Center for Women and Nontraditional Students at MTSU.

The Couture Experience is designed to highlight women who are new in business that focus on health, wellness, beauty and fashion. This free half-day power-packed, informative, interactive expo features foods, products, services and strategies for the new/aspiring business owner.

Students, faculty and staff who are interested in guesting on WGNS to promote their MTSU-related activities should contact Jimmy Hart, director of news and media relations, at 615-898-5131 or via email at jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu.

Telescopes are Alumni Spring Weekend Star Party topic

A special MTSU Alumni Spring Weekend Star Party will feature professor John Wallin discussing “Buying and Using a Telescope” starting at 6:30 p.m. Friday, April 22.

The final Department of Physics and Astronomy Star Party of the 2015-16 academic year will take place in Room 1006 of the Science Building, 440 Friendship St.

Professor John Wallin will discuss buying and using telescopes at the April 22 MTSU Star Party. (MTSU photo by Creative and Visual Services)

Professor John Wallin will discuss buying and using telescopes at the April 22 MTSU Star Party. (MTSU photo by Creative and Visual Services)

The public and campus community are invited. To find parking near the event site for the free event, visit http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

The department conducts star parties as an outreach to the public.

For more information, contact Drs. Eric Klumpe at 615-898-2483 or Eric.Klumpe@mtsu.edu or Chuck Higgins at 615-898-5946 or Chuck.Higgins@mtsu.edu.

The star party is just one of many alumni weekend events scheduled through Sunday, April 24. To learn more, visit www.mtalumni.com or call 615-898-2922.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU library highlights British book jacket art at April 21 reception

Through the end of May, MTSU’s James E. Walker Library will pay tribute to the beauty of a subject seldom discussed today outside the walls of a publishing house.

Guest curator Kyle Stoneman, a lecturer in the Department of Art, will describe and explain the collection at a reception beginning at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21, in the Special Collections Reading Room.

Waugh book exhibit webSitwell book exhibit webOrwell book exhibit web

A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

“All these books used to be very cheap and are now worth hundreds of dollars each,” Stoneman said.

The private collection includes book covers for the works of distinguished authors such as Evelyn Waugh, Virginia Woolf and T.S. Eliot.

“These were authors who had an interest in visual culture,” said Stoneman. “They were intimately connected with their own aesthetic.”

The artists who created the designs include Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, Rex Whistler and Cecil Beaton.

Kyle Stoneman

Kyle Stoneman

Walker LibraryMany were members of the so-called “Bloomsbury Group,” a loosely knit, influential collection of avant-garde authors and artists who grew up between World War I and World War II. Stoneman said their works had a modernist, whimsical quality.

“In many cases, they haven’t been realized as works of art,” Stoneman said. “Now people are starting to realize how wonderful they are.”

“Lightly Worn” is open for free public viewing from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. The April 21 discussion also is free and open to the public.

Off-campus visitors viewing the exhibit should obtain a special one-day permit from MTSU’s Office of Parking and Transportation at www.mtsu.edu/parking/visit.php.

For more information, contact Stoneman at 615-898-2455 or kyle.stoneman@mtsu.edu or Special Collections in the James E. Walker Library at 615-904-8503..

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Investigator set to discuss ‘medical serial killers’ at MTSU April 19

His topic is nightmare fodder, but investigator Bruce Sackman hopes that creating greater awareness of potential serial killers lurking in health care facilities will help prevent more injuries and deaths.

Bruce Sackman

Bruce Sackman

Sackman, the spring 2016 guest of MTSU’s William M. Bass Legends in Forensic Science Lectureship series, will speak Tuesday, April 19, at 6:30 p.m. in the university’s Student Union Ballroom.

His free public talk, “When the Intensive Care Unit Becomes a Crime Scene: Serial Killers in Health Care,” is being presented by MTSU’s Forensic Institute for Research and Education, or FIRE. A searchable, printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Sackman spent more than three decades in federal service, including more than 10 years as special agent in charge of the criminal investigation division at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ Office of Inspector General. In that role, he led fraud and official misconduct investigations covering 295 veterans facilities and more than 50,000 employees across the northeastern corner of the country, as well as supervising homicide investigations involving medical serial killers throughout the United States.

Click on the poster for more lecture details.

Click on the poster for more lecture details.

He has worked since his 2005 retirement as a private investigator in New York specializing in health care fraud. Sackman has lectured across America on medical serial killers, speaking to forensic scientists, criminal investigators and VA medical centers as well as university audiences, and his investigations have been featured on CNN, “America’s Most Wanted,” the Discovery Channel’s “Medical Fraud Investigators,” and HBO.

According to Sackman, 317 confirmed deaths and 2,113 suspicious deaths have been associated with 54 convicted health care providers since 1970.

One of those providers, a German nurse, was jailed for life in 2015 for killing two patients with lethal injections of heart medication and is now suspected in at least 24 more patient deaths. The man told investigators that he injected more than 90 patients with the drug so he could save their lives and appear heroic to his colleagues.

Other “medical serial killers” in the United States include Charles Cullen of New Jersey, who confessed in 2003 to killing 40 patients during his 16-year nursing career and whom authorities fear may have killed more than 300, and Kimberly Saenz of Texas, who was convicted of the 2008 deaths of five dialysis patients after injecting bleach into their dialysis lines.

The Bass Lecture Series, named for internationally renowned University of Tennessee forensic anthropologist Dr. William M. Bass, brings forensic science experts to the MTSU campus each fall and spring.

MTSU’s FIRE, established in 2006, also provides regular educational and training opportunities for law enforcement, medical examiners, coroners, attorneys, social workers, and other groups in forensic science and homeland security.

For more information on this lecture or other FIRE programs and events, contact the FIRE offices at 615-494-7713 or visit www.csimtsu.com.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

‘MTSU On the Record’ guest dissects serial murders in health care

The possibility of murderers lurking in hospital halls and nursing homes was the topic of a recent “MTSU On the Record.”

Bruce Sackman

Bruce Sackman

Host Gina Logue’s interview with private investigator Bruce Sackman first aired April 4 on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ). You can listen to their conversation below.

Sackman will deliver the spring address in the William M. Bass Legends in Forensic Science Lectureship series, “Serial Killers in Health Care,” at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 19, in the Student Union Ballroom.

FIRE logoMTSU’s Forensic Institute for Research and Education, or FIRE, presents the Bass Legends lecture series each semester.

For 32 years, Sackman served as the special agent in charge of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ Northeast field office in the criminal investigations division of the Office of Inspector General.

Until he retired in May 2005, he was responsible for all major criminal investigations from West Virginia to Maine in VA facilities.

Sackman also was responsible for supervising the nation’s first homicide conviction in connection with pharmaceutical research.

“The overwhelming majority of health care professionals are honest, hard-working, dedicated people,” said Sackman. “In fact, that’s how we find out about these suspicious deaths.”

Since 1970, Sackman said, there have been 317 confirmed deaths and 2,113 suspicious deaths associated with 54 convictions of health care providers.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.