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Executive education program offers Jan. 24 sales workshop

Business leaders looking to improve the sales skills are invited register for upcoming one-day sales training workshop through the executive education program at MTSU’s Jennings A. Jones College of Business.

John Boyens

John Boyens

The workshop will be held beginning at 8 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 24, inside the Miller Education Center, 503 E. Bell St.

The interactive workshop will include “best practices” to master the art and the science of selling. Attendees will explore topics such as building rapport and creating personal relationships as well as developing individual success formulas and using social media.

The workshop will be facilitated by John Boyens, CEO of the Boyens Group management and consulting firm and executive in residence in the Jones College.

The cost is $375 per person, which includes all workshop materials, breakfast and a catered lunch. Quantity and military discounts are available. Seating is limited.

For cost and registration information, visit http://mtsu.edu/business/, call 615-395-0200 or click the image below.

Click the image for a full-sized printable version of the flier.

Click the image for a full-sized printable version of the flier.

Grammy-winner Mattea gives guest lecture on music history [+VIDEO]

MTSU student and aspiring country music artist Hunter Wolkonowski of Winchester, Tennessee, knew that singer-songwriter Kathy Mattea was coming to give a guest lecture earlier this semester. But the real thing — which even included a few songs by the Grammy-winning country music artist — was still surreal.

“I’ve been a fan of country music since I was a young girl, and I’d come in the house and I’d hear my Nana playing records on the record machine, and she’d play Kathy Mattea,” said Wolkonowski, who’s majoring in recording industry management within the College of Media and Entertainment.

Grammy-winning country music artist Kathy Mattea makes a point during her guest lecture to MTSU professor Kris McCusker’s “American Music in the Modern Age” class inside Peck Hall in late November. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Grammy-winning country music artist Kathy Mattea makes a point during her guest lecture to MTSU professor Kris McCusker’s “American Music in the Modern Age” class inside Peck Hall in late November. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

“I’ve always looked up to (Mattea), so when I walked in, I couldn’t believe it was her. She was super nice, super grounded … I guess she is something I’d want to be when I grow up because I’m wanting to be in country music.”

Wolkonowski was among the 20 or so students in MTSU professor Kris McCusker’s popular music studies class, “American Music in the Modern Age,” who were treated to more than an hour of insights and wisdom from the Nashville singer-songwriter earlier this semester.

McCusker, a professionally trained ethnomusicologist and historian, said her Department of History course looks at how historical events have shaped music, such as producing certain kinds of “sounds” and/or musicians.

“What we do is see the ways that history produces music, how music is the outcome of political, cultural and social changes at various points in the past,” she said.

Mattea’s visit stemmed from an interview she did with a graduate student last spring. McCusker assisted the student with the phone interview, which was done from MTSU’s Center for Popular Music in the Bragg Media and Entertainment Building.

An invitation was extended, which Mattea gladly accepted. Greg Reish, director of the Center for Popular Music, assisted McCusker with the logistics to bring Mattea to campus.

“She’s a real educator at heart,” said McCusker, who noted that her class was studying music the 1980s and 90s, a period when Mattea was hitting it big on the country music scene. Mattea rose to prominence in the 1980s with hits such as “Eighteen Wheels and a Dozen Roses,” “Goin’ Gone” and “Love at the Five and Dime.”

Here’s a short video of McCusker discussing the visit and a few clips of Mattea performing “Seeds” for the class:

Mattea shared with students how she got started in her music career during that time and also discussed her social activism around issues such as HIV/AIDS and the environment. The AIDS activism was sparked by Mattea having friends who died from AIDS, but “nobody was talking about it,” McCusker said. A native of West Virginia coal country, Mattea would later turn her attention to the environment.

Grammy-winning country music artist Kathy Mattea, top right, gives a guest lecture to MTSU professor Kris McCusker’s “American Music in the Modern Age” class inside Peck Hall in late November. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Grammy-winning country music artist Kathy Mattea, top right, gives a guest lecture to MTSU professor Kris McCusker’s “American Music in the Modern Age” class inside Peck Hall in late November. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Using McCusker’s class guitar, Mattea even performed a few selections, including her song “Seeds” that includes this verse: “In the end, we’re all just seeds in God’s hands, we start the same, but where we land, it’s sometimes fertile soil, it’s sometimes sand, we’re all just seeds in God’s hands.”

These days and in the wake of a bitterly divisive presidential election, Mattea shared with students “the beginnings of the ways she started seeing music differently, from simply being an entertainment medium, to a medium that builds relationships among people, that crosses political barriers around certain environmental and social issues,” McCusker said.

Wolkonowski, who performs under the name Hunter Girl a few times each week at various venues in Nashville, was inspired by Mattea’s socially conscious perspective.

“I really liked how she had the ability to write songs that pertain to what’s going on in the world right now,” she said. “All of her songs have a story … she really puts social and economic things that are going on in our life today and puts them into words for people who can’t really speak up about things.”

McCusker said Mattea plans to return to MTSU in the spring to work with Reish in the Center for Popular Music.

For more information about the MTSU Department of History, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/history/index.php.

For more information about the Center for Popular Music, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/popmusic/index.php.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

Grammy-winning country music artist Kathy Mattea, center, is pictured with MTSU professor Kris McCusker (kneeling at right of Mattea) and students in McCusker’s “American Music in the Modern Age” class inside Peck Hall. Mattea gave a guest lecture to the class in late November. (Photo courtesy of Kris McCusker)

Grammy-winning country music artist Kathy Mattea, center, is pictured with MTSU professor Kris McCusker (kneeling at right of Mattea) and students in McCusker’s “American Music in the Modern Age” class inside Peck Hall. Mattea gave a guest lecture to the class in late November. (Photo courtesy of Kris McCusker)

Grammy-winning country music artist Kathy Mattea, right, takes a photo with MTSU students Hunter Wolkonowski, left, and Terri Harris following Mattea’s guest lecture to a music history class in late November. (Photo courtesy of Kris McCusker)

Grammy-winning country music artist Kathy Mattea, right, takes a photo with MTSU students Hunter Wolkonowski, left, and Terri Harris following Mattea’s guest lecture to a music history class in late November. (Photo courtesy of Kris McCusker)

MTSU on WGNS: The Founders, security boosts, consumer polls

MTSU faculty and staff took to WGNS Radio recently to share information about recent efforts to boost campus security, a spring break honors course to study the Founding Fathers, and a recap of recent results for our quarterly statewide consumer survey.

The details were shared during the Dec. 19 “Action Line” program with host Bart Walker. The live program was broadcast on FM 100.5, 101.9 and AM 1450 from the WGNS studio in downtown Murfreesboro. If you missed it, you can listen to a podcast of the show here.

Guests and their topics were as follows:

MTSU faculty and staff appeared Monday, Dec. 19, on WGNS Radio’s “Action Line” program. Pictured are, top left, University Police Chief Buddy Peaster; bottom left, Dr. Tim Graeff, director of the MTSU Office of Consumer Research; and Dr. John Vile, dean of University Honors College. (MTSU photo illustration by Jimmy Hart)

MTSU faculty and staff appeared Monday, Dec. 19, on WGNS Radio’s “Action Line” program. Pictured are, top left, University Police Chief Buddy Peaster; bottom left, Dr. Tim Graeff, director of the MTSU Office of Consumer Research; and Dr. John Vile, dean of University Honors College. (MTSU photo illustration by Jimmy Hart)

• MTSU Police Chief Buddy Peaster discussed recent campus security upgrades, including the creation of “active shooter” pocket guides and installation more surveillance cameras throughout campus.

The university has created and begun distributing an active shooter pocket guide while also increasing video surveillance and announcing plans to install emergency call stations around campus.

The multi-year camera project represents a $1.1 million investment that will allow police to better investigate incidents captured on video as well as better respond to situations in real time. Read more at www.mtsunews.com/active-shooter-guides-cameras.

• Dr. John Vile, dean of the University Honors College and well-respected Constitutional scholar, discussed his spring 2017 Constitutional course that includes a trip with students to Virginia and Washington, D.C.

Vile, a political scientist and native Virginian, will teach the spring 2017 course “Junior Interdisciplinary Seminar: The Constitutional and Political Legacy of America’s Founders.”

During spring break, March 4-11, the class will visit numerous locations in Virginia and the District of Columbia. You can learn more about his plan at www.mtsunews.com/vile-on-the-record-dec2015.

• Dr. Tim Graeff, director of the MTSU Office of Consumer Research in the Jones College of Business, discussed the latest Consumer Outlook Survey that shows more optimism this holiday season.

The Tennessee Consumer Outlook Index soared to 113 from 47 in September. The quarterly survey consists of a series of questions that measure areas such as how consumers feel about the local, state and national economies as well as their personal financial situations and the job market.

When asked about the possible effects of the recent presidential election on the economy, the majority of Tennessee consumers expect that Trump’s victory will have a positive effect on the future of the overall American economy.

Read more and see the full survey report at www.mtsunews.com/tenn-consumer-outlook-dec2016.

Students, faculty and staff who are interested in guesting on WGNS to promote their MTSU-related activities should contact Jimmy Hart, director of news and media relations, at 615-898-5131 or via email at jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu.

‘MTSU On the Record’ takes historic road trip to America’s origins

A deeper look at what motivated our Founding Fathers to build a new nation is ahead on the next “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. John Vile

Dr. John Vile

WMOT-new web logoHost Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. John Vile, dean of MTSU’s University Honors College, aired from 6 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 18, on WMOT-FM/Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org. (Listen to the full interview below)

Vile, a political scientist and native Virginian, will teach the spring 2017 course “Junior Interdisciplinary Seminar: The Constitutional and Political Legacy of America’s Founders.”

During spring break, March 4-11, the class will visit numerous locations in Virginia and the District of Columbia.

The itinerary for the spring break trip includes:

  • Poplar Forest, President Thomas Jefferson’s private retreat in Forest, Virginia.
  • Monticello, Jefferson’s estate, and Ash Lawn, President James Monroe’s home, both in Charlottesville, Virginia.
  • Montpelier, President James Madison’s home, in Orange, Virginia.
  • St. John’s Church in Richmond, Virginia, where Patrick Henry delivered his famous “give me liberty or give me death” speech in 1775.
  • Several sites in Williamsburg, Virginia, including the College of William and Mary.
  • Mount Vernon, President George Washington’s home, in the Virginia community named for it.
  • Gunston Hall, the Lorton, Virginia, home of George Mason, a delegate to the first Constitutional Convention and the acknowledged “father of the Bill of Rights.”
  • The National Archives and the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

“We’re primarily concentrating on the period from 1776 to roughly 1791, you know, some of the early presidents,” said Vile. “We are going to try to integrate some work related to women and African-Americans, who sometimes get overlooked in the period.”

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

MTSU on WGNS: MTSU Arts, political polling and social work

MTSU faculty and staff took to WGNS Radio recently to share information about an upcoming theatrical production at Tucker Theatre, the future of political polling and growth in the field of social work.

The details were shared during the Nov. 21 “Action Line” program with host Bart Walker. The live program was broadcast on FM 100.5, 101.9 and AM 1450 from the WGNS studio in downtown Murfreesboro. If you missed it, you can listen to a podcast of the show here.

Guests and their topics included:WGNS new logo 2015_web crop

• Meredith Kerr, development director for the College of Liberal Arts, Justin Reed, production manager at Tucker Theatre, and theatre student Skylar Grieco, one of the performance directors, discussed the recent “Joys of the Season” showcase held Dec. 1 at Tucker Theatre.

Meredith Kerr

Meredith Kerr

MTSU Arts proudly presented “Joys of the Season,” a collection of holiday performances and artwork from the MTSU performing and fine arts departments that will entertain and delight people and children of all ages.

First held last year, the event is a showcase of music, art, theater and dance. Presenting sponsor for this production was Ascend Federal Credit Union and the media sponsor was WGNS Radio.

Learn more at www.mtsuarts.com.

• Drs. Ken Blake and Jason Reineke, director and associate director of the MTSU Poll, discussed the MTSU Poll and the future polling in the wake of the surprising presidential election.

Dr. Ken Blake

Dr. Ken Blake

Dr. Jason Reineke

Dr. Jason Reineke

For over a decade, the MTSU Poll has been providing independent, non-partisan, unbiased, scientifically valid public opinion data regarding major social, political, and ethical issues affecting Tennessee. The poll began in 1998 as a measure of public opinion in the 39 counties comprising Middle Tennessee and began measuring public opinion statewide in 2001.

The future of polling has been under intense scrutiny following the surprise election of Republican Donald Trump, in spite of the fact that many polls gave the edge to Democratic contender Hillary Clinton. In recent months, Trump frequently lambasted the polls as inaccurate and not reflective of his overall support. Many professional pollsters have been analyzing the results to find out what went wrong.

Learn more at http://mtsupoll.org.

• Dr. Angela Pharris, assistant professor in the Department of Social Work and coordinator of the Master of Social Work program, discussed the growth of MTSU’s social work program.

Dr. Angela Pharris

Dr. Angela Pharris

With 330 plus students enrolled, the MTSU Department of Social Work boasts the largest undergraduate program in Tennessee and continues to build an innovative master’s program that shares resources with Austin Peay State and Tennessee State universities.

Social Work is a growing profession with a 19 percent faster than average growth rate in the United States. Social workers help people solve and cope with problems in their everyday lives. One group of social workers, clinical social workers, also diagnose and treat mental, behavioral, and emotional issues.

Learn more at http://mtsu.edu/socialwork/index.php.

Students, faculty and staff who are interested in guesting on WGNS to promote their MTSU-related activities should contact Jimmy Hart, director of news and media relations, at 615-898-5131 or via email at jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu.

Adams creates archive of Appalachian images at Baldwin Gallery

Award-winning environmental portrait photographer Shelby Lee Adams will create a special archive at Middle Tennessee State University of his works that explore rural Appalachian family life.

Adams, whose friendship with MTSU professor Tom Jimison led to the creation of the archive, will provide a significant portion of his photographic collection to the Baldwin Photographic Gallery in the university’s College of Media and Entertainment. A selection of Adams’ work can be found at a special exhibit in the Baldwin Gallery that opened Oct. 24 and will run through Jan. 19.

Tom Jimison

Tom Jimison

Shelby Lee Adams

Shelby Lee Adams

Adams will discuss the gift during his appearance on the MTSU campus at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17, for a lecture on his career and works.

The event, which is free and open to the public, will be held in Room 221 of the Ned McWherter Learning Resources Center, located at 1558 Military Memorial.

The Eastern Kentucky native will allow MTSU to keep part of the proceeds from sales of prints of his compelling portfolio of powerful images created from more than four decades of visiting, photographing and collaborating with families in Appalachia.

“An artist of the magnitude of Shelby Lee Adams will raise the stature of the Baldwin Gallery and raise the consciousness of students and scholars looking to understand the conditions and quality of life in Appalachia,” said MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee.

“The Cock Fighter” is among Shelby Lee Adams’ portfolio of powerful images created from more than four decades of visiting, photographing and collaborating with families in Appalachia. (Courtesy of Shelby Lee Adams)

“The Cock Fighter” is among Shelby Lee Adams’ portfolio of powerful images created from more than four decades of visiting, photographing and collaborating with families in Appalachia. (Courtesy of Shelby Lee Adams)

“We are honored that Mr. Adams has entrusted our university to ensure the legacy of his work and allow it to educate and inform our students and our communities.”

Adams met Jimison in 1980, when Jimison asked the photographer to exhibit his work at the University of Dayton, where Jimison was teaching.

“It was my first one-person exhibition,” Adams recalled. “We became fast friends and we have continued our relationship.”

It also made sense for MTSU to house the archive, Adams said, because of the “proximity of MTSU to the people in the mountains of Eastern Kentucky I have photographed and the fact the people I have photographed will receive a portion of the print sales.Baldwin Gallery logo web

“They will also be able to come to the archive and enjoy the photographs — and receive digital photocopies of my work.”

The gallery, located on the second floor of the Bragg Media and Entertainment Building, is free and open to the public. Check baldwinphotogallery.com for hours.

A Kirkus review of a book of Adams’ 1993 work, “Appalachian Portraits,” described his photographs as “frank, unsentimental but often affectionate.” His photographs, the review said, show the effects of poverty but also “a resilience and grace….

“These black-and-white photographs of families gathered on the porches or in the crowded rooms of their hardscrabble, venerable homes show a remarkable crispness of detail.”

Adams, 66, graduated from the Cleveland Institute of Art in 1974 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts, then earned a master’s degree in photography from the University of Iowa in 1975 and a Master of Fine Arts from the Massachusetts College of the Arts in 1989.

He was one of seven photographers selected in 1978 by the National Endowment for the Arts to collectively make images in Kentucky for a publication, “Appalachia: A Self-Portrait.” He received an NEA fellowship in 1992.

In 1989, Adams was selected for the Massachusetts Artist Fellowship Program and from 1989 to 1992 earned artist support grants from Polaroid Corp. He received the Guggenheim Photography Fellowship in 2010.

Adams said his perspective was shaped by growing up in Appalachia during President Lyndon B. Johnson’s “War on Poverty” program.

“Many of the media representations of the people of the mountains of Eastern Kentucky were disappointing or embarrassing,” he said. “I decided then to dedicate my life to photographing the people of the mountains in a way that was both honest and accepted by the subjects.”

MTSU will offer a special limited-edition print of the photograph “The Brothers Praying” (1993) for sale to initiate the archive’s funding. The negative will be permanently retired after this printing of 12 images.

Dr. Harold Baldwin, an MTSU mass communication professor emeritus, displays one of the masterpieces in the university gallery collection that bears his name. The Ansel Adams print of "Moonrise, Hernandez, New Mexico," now has a new home inside the Bragg Mass Communication Building on campus. (MTSU file photo by J. Intintoli)

Dr. Harold Baldwin, an MTSU professor emeritus. (MTSU file photo by J. Intintoli)

The Baldwin Gallery, part of the Department of Electronic Media Communication, is named for Professor Emeritus Harold Baldwin, who established MTSU’s photography program in 1959 and established the gallery five years later to expose the university community to work by leading photographers. Jimison has curated the gallery since 1991.

The gallery, renamed in 1996 to honor Baldwin, grew from a hallway in the MTSU Ned McWherter Learning Resource Center to a 1,300-square-foot facility in 2014 with museum-quality lighting in the Bragg building, thanks to a $100,000 gift from Baldwin to enhance the facility.

For off-campus visitors interested in the Adams lecture and/or visiting the gallery, a searchable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap. Those visiting the Baldwin Gallery during normal business hours should obtain a special one-day permit from MTSU’s Office of Parking and Transportation at www.mtsu.edu/parking/visit.php.

The College of Media and Entertainment, first established as a department in 1972, then elevated to school and then college status by 1989, has focused on preparing students to perform every facet of communicating news and information within their specialties: journalism, electronic media and the recording industry.

For more information about the college, visit www.mtsu.edu/media.

— Andrew Oppmann (andrew.oppmann@mtsu.edu)

Accounting, auditing, tax and ethics among topics for Accounting CPE Day

Register now to earn continuing education credits at the upcoming eighth annual Department of Accounting CPE Day at Middle Tennessee State University.

The event will be held Thursday, Dec. 1, from 8 a.m. to 4:50 p.m. at the Miller Education Center, 503 Bell St.

Seminars during the conference include presentations on accounting and financial reporting, auditing, taxation and ethics. Participants can earn up to eight hours of Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credit. The cost is $175, which includes all seminars, materials, and lunch.

The sessions include:Accounting seminar graphic-July2016

  • “FASB Update,” Dr. Stan Clark, MTSU associate professor of accounting
  • “Revenue Recognition,” Dr. Jeannie Harrington, MTSU interim chair and associate professor of accounting
  • “Behavioral Finance,” James Bertram, Nuveen Investments
  • “Uber: Will Classifying Workers as Independent Contractors Succeed,” Sandy Benson, MTSU associate professor, and Master of Accountancy students
  • “Q&A on Significant Legal Cases,” Aubrey B. Harwell Jr., Neal and Harwell, and Dr. James Burton, MTSU professor of accounting
  • “Tennessee-Specific Ethics,” Don Mills, Tennessee State Board of Accountancy investigator
  • “Protecting Client Retirement Assets,” Robert Labadini, John Hancock Investments
  • “Market Intelligence,” Robert Labadini, John Hancock Investments
  • “Audit Update,” John Wermert, MTSU associate professor and director of the Accounting Graduate Program
  • “Tax Update,” Dr. Tim Koski, MTSU professor of accounting
  • “Are You Positioned for Your Future,” Marshall Marin, Petra Coaching

To register or get more information, visit the Jones College of Business’ Department of Accounting website at http://www.mtsu.edu/accounting or call the department at 615-898-5306.

Also, the 26th annual Department of Accounting Alumni CPE Day at MTSU will be held on Thursday, April 27, 2017.

Michael Brown Sr. to address youth-police interactions Thursday

The father of a young man whose death sparked a national conversation about police treatment of African-American men will speak at MTSU.

Michael Brown Sr. will deliver an address, “Chosen for Change,” at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17, in the Student Union Ballroom. The event is free and open to the public.

Michael Brown Sr.

Michael Brown Sr.

“Chosen for Change” is a nonprofit organization whose mission is “saving lives one day at a time through empowering youth, strengthening families and giving back,” according to its Facebook page at  www.facebook.com/MichaelBrownFoundationCFC.

The foundation, which is based in Florrisant, Missouri, grew out of the April 9, 2014, shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown Jr., by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri. The incident inspired protests that lasted for more than a week.

chosen-for-change-logoAn investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation concluded that the officer fired in self-defense, and a grand jury declined to indict the officer.

A hearing on a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the Brown family against the officer, Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson and the City of Ferguson is scheduled for May 2017.

MTSU’s Office of Intercultural and Diversity Affairs and Student Programming & Raider Entertainment are presenting Brown’s talk.

For off-campus visitors attending the event, a printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

For more information, contact the Office of Intercultural and Diversity Affairs at 615-898-5812 or ida@mtsu.edu.

— Gina Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Attorney/Native American activist discusses pipeline dispute Thursday

The ongoing demonstration by Native Americans against a pipeline construction project that would cross a reservation in North and South Dakota will be discussed Thursday, Nov. 17, at MTSU.

Attorney Albert Bender, a Cherokee activist from Antioch, Tennessee, will discuss what he has witnessed at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation at 4:30 p.m. Nov. 17 in Room N119 of the Cason-Kennedy Nursing Building. Bender’s talk is open to the public, but seating is limited.

Albert Bender

Albert Bender

A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap. Off-campus visitors attending the daytime events should obtain a special one-day permit from MTSU’s Office of Parking and Transportation at www.mtsu.edu/parking/visit.php.

The Standing Rock Indian Reservation, which spans parts of both North and South Dakota, is the scene of demonstrations against the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, an oil pipeline that stretches from northwestern North Dakota to southern Illinois and crosses land that reservation residents consider significant to their history, culture and religion.

The opponents also assert that the pipeline would pose a threat to the reservation’s sole water supply, the Missouri River.

The Hunkpapa Lakota and Yanktonai Dakota people, collectively called the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, are the primary residents of the Standing Rock reservation. The Hunkpapa people of Standing Rock live predominantly on the South Dakota portion of the reservation, while the Yanktonai live on the North Dakota side.

Bender will share information from his visit to protest camps located outside the pipeline site earlier this year. He also will shed light on the lawsuit filed by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in hopes of stopping the pipeline.

For more information, contact the Office of Intercultural and Diversity Affairs at 615-898-5812 or ida@mtsu.edu.

— Gina Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Opponents of the Dakota Access Pipeline project demonstrate outside the offices of the law firm Fredrikson and Byron, which represents pipeline builder Energy Transfer Partners, in Bismarck, North Dakota, Aug. 29. Tennessee attorney/activist Albert Bender will discuss the issue Thursday, Nov. 17, at MTSU. (Photo courtesy of Melanie Bender/People’s World)

Opponents of the Dakota Access Pipeline project demonstrate outside the offices of the law firm Fredrikson and Byron, which represents pipeline builder Energy Transfer Partners, in Bismarck, North Dakota, Aug. 29. Tennessee attorney/activist Albert Bender will discuss the issue Thursday, Nov. 17, at MTSU. (Photo courtesy of Melanie Bender/People’s World)

Harmonica great Charlie McCoy set for Nov. 14 MTSU talk, concert

The multitalented harmonica player who’s left his inimitable stamp on decades of country and rock recordings will visit MTSU Monday, Nov. 14, to discuss his amazing career and perform in a free public event.

Charlie McCoy poster webCharlie McCoy will sit down at 7 p.m. Nov. 14 in the Tennessee Room inside MTSU’s James Union Building with West Virginia University’s Dr. Travis Stimeling, a leading authority on Nashville’s classic era of recording, to discuss McCoy’s adventures as one of the original “Nashville Cats” session musicians and as a recording artist in his own right.

McCoy, 75, will follow the discussion with a performance with his band of Nashville pros.

MTSU’s Center for Popular Music is presenting the event. A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

McCoy, a native of Oak Hill, West Virginia, who was raised in Miami, Florida, began his musical career on a 50-cent harmonica at age 8.

His talents ultimately led him to Nashville, where he played drums, guitar and bass in bands and cut his own single before Chet Atkins first hired him as a session musician in 1961. Ann-Margret’s “I Just Don’t Understand” and Roy Orbison’s “Candy Man” were the first of hundreds to include McCoy’s harmonica.

new-CPM-logo-webBy the mid-’60s, McCoy was a fixture on Elvis Presley’s records and movie soundtracks, and after a chance meeting in New York City in 1965, he collaborated regularly with Bob Dylan on classics that included the “Highway 61 Revisited,” “Blonde on Blonde,” “John Wesley Harding” and “Nashville Skyline” albums.

His work with Dylan led to sessions with other rock and folk artists, including Joan Baez, Paul Simon, Ringo Starr, Buffy Sainte-Marie and Johnny Cash.

McCoy, who also plays keyboards and several wind and brass instruments, has contributed to thousands of records in the last 50-plus years, including Dolly Parton’s “My Tennessee Mountain Home” and George Jones’ “He Stopped Loving Her Today.”

He’s released more than two dozen of his own albums, including the Grammy-winning “The Real McCoy” and the No. 1 “Good Time Charlie,” served as music director for the “Hee Haw” TV show for 19 years and was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2009.

You can learn more about McCoy at his website, http://charliemccoy.com.

The Center for Popular Music, part of MTSU’s College of Media and Entertainment, is one of the nation’s largest and richest repositories of research materials related to American vernacular music.

For more information on MTSU’s Center for Popular Music and its projects and special events, visit www.mtsu.edu/popmusic.

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