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Seddon returns to EYH for STEM keynote; register by Aug. 25

Girls and young women attending the Oct. 22 Expanding Your Horizons in Math and Science Conference at MTSU will be in for a treat: the keynote speaker for the very first EYH in 1997 will be addressing the participants at the 20th annual gathering.

Dr. Rhea Seddon

Dr. Rhea Seddon

Murfreesboro native, physician and 19-year NASA veteran Rhea Seddon — a mission specialist in 1985 and ’91 and payload commander in charge of all science activities in her final space flight in 1993 — has agreed to provide the keynote address at 9 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 22, in the Ned McWherter Learning Resources Center.

Openings remain for middle school and high school girls to register for Expanding Your Horizons, a STEM-centered conference running from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

The deadline to register is Thursday, Aug. 25.Attendees can go to www.mtsu.edu/wistem/eyh and click on “EYH” and then “Registration.”

Expanding Your Horizons is a hands-on math and science event aimed at helping girls consider careers in STEM — science, technology, engineering and math — fields.

The annual event gives girls opportunities to talk with women in STEM careers and with other girls who share their interests.

EYH logoSeddon said she’s looking forward to her appearance. One of her favorite themes while speaking with young people is “if you can see it, you can be it.”

“I’ve enjoyed so many wonderful opportunities, but it took quite a few years of hard work and preparation,” Seddon said of her career.

Girls and young women today ask questions similar to those asked in 1997 when they realize an astronaut is in their midst, the physician said.

Dr. Judith Iriarte-Gross

Dr. Judith Iriarte-Gross

“Girls want to hear what it was like to be an astronaut,” she said. “I try to show young people what it’s like, what life is like and how to get there.”

During her talks, she also shares the importance of taking STEM courses.

Her book, “Go for Orbit,” the recipient of a 2016 Independent Book Publisher’s Association Ben Franklin Award, provides a first-time insight into the U.S. space program from a woman’s perspective.

“We are thrilled to have Dr. Seddon as our keynote,” said Dr. Judith Iriarte-Gross, an MTSU chemistry professor and director of both EYH and the MTSU Women in STEM (WISTEM) Center.

“She is an outstanding role model for these young women.”

Iriarte-Gross added that workshops for adults planning to attend will soon be added to the website.

For more information, call her at 615-904-8253 or email Judith.Iriarte-Gross@mtsu.edu.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Dr. Heather Brown, right, chair of the MTSU Concrete Industry Management program, shows participants at a previous Expanding Your Horizons in Math and Science event how concrete products are made and discusses career opportunities. (MTSU file photo)

Dr. Heather Brown, right, chair of the MTSU Concrete Industry Management program, shows participants at a previous Expanding Your Horizons in Math and Science event how concrete products are made and discusses career opportunities. (MTSU file photo)

Digital animation alumna returns to MTSU for special talk

An Oscar-winning MTSU media alumna is returning to campus Wednesday, Aug. 17, for a special student event that’s also open to the public.

Mikki Rose webMikki Rose, a member of the Rhythm & Hues Studios team that won the 2008 Oscar for Visual Effects for their groundbreaking animation work on “The Golden Compass,” will speak to the MTSU student chapter of ACM SIGGRAPH at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 17 in Room 148 of the Bragg Media and Entertainment Building on campus.

Click on the logo to visit the Facebook page for the MTSU Student Chapter of ACM SIGGRAPH. https://www.facebook.com/MtsuAcmSiggraphStudentChapter.

Click on the logo to visit the Facebook page for the MTSU Student Chapter of ACM SIGGRAPH.

The event is free and open to the public. A searchable, printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Rose, who earned her MTSU bachelor’s degrees in mass communication/digital animation and computer science in 2005, now works for Blue Sky Studios in Greenwich, Connecticut, as a Fur Technical Director — what she calls “a CG hair stylist” — specializing in hair and cloth visual effects and animation for feature films.

She’s been affiliated with the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on Computer Graphics and Interactive Technique since 2002, rising from student volunteer to co-chair of the organization’s 2015 international computer animation festival and serving as production services chair for the 2016 SIGGRAPH international conference.

Blue Sky Studios logo webRose’s talk with the student group will focus on her career, which has also included a stint at Sony Pictures Imageworks. At Rhythm & Hues, she worked on two “Alvin and the Chipmunks” movies and “Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian,” “The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor” and “Aliens in the Attic” and managed a team of technical animation directors.

At Sony Imageworks, Rose’s talents dressed and coiffed characters in “Alice in Wonderland,” “Arthur Christmas,” “Men in Black III,” “Hotel Transylvania,” “Oz the Great and Powerful” and “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2.”

Her most recent projects with Blue Sky include 2015’s “The Peanuts Movie,” this year’s “Ice Age: Collision Course” and the upcoming feature “Ferdinand.”

In 2012, Rose was added to the College of Media and Entertainment’s “Wall of Fame,” an annual honor reserved for accomplished media alumni.

You can watch Rose briefly discuss her involvement with SIGGRAPH in this video:

http://youtu.be/ROWinsJOFwk

For more information about Rose’s visit or the MTSU student chapter of ACM SIGGRAPH, contact Kevin McNulty, MTSU professor of electronic media communication, at kevin.mcnulty@mtsu.edu or visit the organization’s Facebook page: www.facebook.com/MtsuAcmSiggraphStudentChapter.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU media alumna Mikki Rose, who’ll return to campus Aug. 17 for a special visit, is among the animators who worked on this year’s “Peanuts Movie.” This scene from the Blue Sky Studios’ film shows plenty of Rose’s specialty, which she calls “CG hair stylist.’’

MTSU media alumna Mikki Rose, who’ll return to campus Aug. 17 for a special visit, is among the animators who worked on this year’s “Peanuts Movie.” This scene from the Blue Sky Studios film shows plenty of Rose’s specialty, which she calls “CG hair stylist.’’ (Photo courtesy Blue Sky Studios)

Sportscaster Greg Gumbel set for keynote at sold-out BRAA dinner

The Blue Raider Athletic Association’s annual Donor Celebration Dinner will have a different flair this year. The change received a tremendous response as the event is already sold out.

Slated for Friday, Aug. 12, this year’s dinner will for the first time be held at Embassy Suites in Murfreesboro. The event will also for the first time feature a guest speaker – sportscaster Greg Gumbel.

Sportscaster Greg Gumbel will be the keynote speaker at the sold-out Aug. 12 Blue Raider Athletic Association Celebration Dinner at Embassy Suites in Murfreesboro. (Submitted photo)

Sportscaster Greg Gumbel will be the keynote speaker at the sold-out Aug. 12 Blue Raider Athletic Association Celebration Dinner at Embassy Suites in Murfreesboro. (Submitted photo)

“We’ve never had a guest speaker of this magnitude before, so having Greg Gumbel there will be a huge addition,” said Bethany Thurston, director of development/stewardship and special events for the Blue Raider Athletic Association.

Gumbel is best known for his work on CBS broadcasts of the National Football League and college basketball. He is currently the host of “Inside the NFL,” which airs on Showtime and NFL Network.

BRAA new logo-webIn addition to his work on CBS, Gumbel has worked on networks like ESPN, NBC and others, and has hosted the Winter Olympics and World Figure Skating Championships to go along with football, basketball and baseball duties. He is also one of four broadcasters to have been a host and play-by-play announcer for Super Bowls, and was the first African-American (and Creole) announcer to do play-by-play for a major sports championship in the U.S.

Gumbel was secured through the Jones College of Business, through his involvement with the Premiere Speakers Bureau. The partnership between the Jones College and the Premiere Speakers Bureau was shared with the BRAA.Jones College of Business logo-updated

“The Jones College of Business has been a huge help with this event, financially and with the planning process,” added Thurston. “It’s always a great thing when two campus groups can partner to show our appreciation for the generous contributions that we receive from our donors.”

Read the full GoBlueRaiders.com story here.

MTSU on WGNS: #TRUE Blue Tour, partnerships, student success

MTSU faculty and staff took to the radio recently to share information about an MT Athletics upcoming promotional tour, new efforts to strengthen partnerships with business and industry, and a new center focused on helping students reach their fullest potential.

The details were shared during the July 18 “Action Line” program with host Bryan Barrett. The live program was broadcast on FM 100.5, 101.9 and AM 1450 from the WGNS studio in downtown Murfreesboro. If you missed it, you can listen to a podcast of the show here.

Guests included:

• Danielle Mayeaux, assistant athletic director of marketing for MT Athletics, discussed the fourth annual #TRUE Blue Summer Tour starting July 28.

MTSU faculty and staff appeared on the July 18 WGNS Radio "Action Line" program. Pictured are, top from left, Danielle Mayeaux, assistant athletic director of marketing for MT Athletics, and Paula Mansfield, director of strategic partnerships in the MTSU Office of University Advancement; bottom, special assistant to the dean for Student Success and Strategic Partnerships in the MTSU College of Behavioral and Health Sciences. (MTSU photo illustration)

MTSU faculty and staff appeared on the July 18 WGNS Radio “Action Line” program. Pictured are, top from left, Danielle Mayeaux, assistant athletic director of marketing for MT Athletics, and Paula Mansfield, director of strategic partnerships in the MTSU Office of University Advancement; bottom, special assistant to the dean for Student Success and Strategic Partnerships in the MTSU College of Behavioral and Health Sciences. (MTSU photo illustration)

The goal of the #TRUE Blue summer tour is to connect with the community in order to get fans excited about the 2016 season. Each stop will allow fans the opportunity to get autographs from and to mingle with Blue Raider coaches and players and members of the spirit squads. Fans will also be able to pick up season ticket information, posters, schedule cards and various MT Athletics promotional items.

For the complete list, go here.

• Paula Mansfield, new director of strategic partnerships in the MTSU Office of University Advancement, discussed her new role at MTSU and plans going forward.

After three decades of experience and “relationship building” in the financial services industry, Mansfield was hired earlier this year to provide a single point of contact between MTSU and corporate partners as well as other external and internal constituencies to build stronger relationships that lead to ongoing collaborations that impact inside and outside the classroom.

For more about the Office of University Advancement, go here.

• Dr. Colby Jubenville, special assistant to the dean for Student Success and Strategic Partnerships in the MTSU College of Behavioral and Health Sciences, discussed his role at MTSU as well as his background and expertise in coaching people to “go their own way” to monetize their knowledge and skills.

In 2016, Jubenville secured $1 million in private monies and launched The Center for Student Success and Coaching, a high profile student success initiative focused on coaching students, enhancing problem solving capabilities, professional preparation, personal branding and emotional intelligence. He serves as the director of the center, which will be housed in the Miller Education Center on Bell Street.

Learn more about his work here.

Students, faculty and staff who are interested in guesting on WGNS to promote their MTSU-related activities should contact Jimmy Hart, director of news and media relations, at 615-898-5131 or via email at jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu.

Charleston church massacre remembered on ‘MTSU On the Record’

In the midst of national turmoil over racial issues, the “MTSU On the Record” radio program recently reviewed the 2015 massacre in Charleston, South Carolina.

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Latoya Eaves, a lecturer in the Global Studies and Cultural Geography program, first aired July 25 on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org). You can listen to their conversation below.

Dr. Latoya Eaves

Dr. Latoya Eaves

In an essay for the journal “Southeastern Geographer,” Eaves wrote poignantly of the slayings of nine African-Americans during Bible study at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, the oldest black church in the South, on June 17, 2015.

Titled “We Wear the Mask,” a reference to Paul Laurence Dunbar’s poem about the inability of African-Americans to give voice to all their emotions in a white-dominated society, the essay analyzes the quality of forgiveness as a black survival tactic.

Eaves said she was struck by how the forgiveness shown by the victims’ loved ones toward the alleged murderer, Dylann Roof, resonated with people through both conventional and social media.

“Forgiveness, in a way, is a way to navigate the world, and it’s a pretty safe thing to do, and it’s also very important,” said Eaves. “But it doesn’t take care of the issues that underlie some of this very structural violence against people.”

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information, contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

https://youtu.be/uTA4F13sI_s

‘MTSU On the Record’ helps ACE Learning Center ‘Saddle Up’

Helping children develop properly in their formative years was the topic of a recent “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Christy Davis, director of the Ann Campbell Early Learning Center, first aired July 18 on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org). You can listen to their conversation below.

Christy Davis

Christy Davis

Saddle Up 2016 graphic web

This year marks the 10th anniversary of “Saddle Up,” the center’s major annual fundraising event, which is slated for 5:30 to 8 p.m. Saturday, July 29, at Murphy Center.

“We’re going to make it family-friendly,” said Davis. “We’ll have a magician. Discovery Center will have animals. We’ll have puppet-making … science activities, a horse-grooming station … a giant coloring book.”

The ACE Learning Center, formerly known as Project HELP, gives young children with and without developmental delays a head start on life by helping them develop good motor skills, social abilities, cognitive abilities and communication skills.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information, contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

MTSU on WGNS: MALA, ‘Saddle Up’ event and new leadership training

MTSU faculty and staff took to the radio recently to share information about a new, flexible master’s program, an upcoming fundraiser for a childhood learning center and a new workforce leadership program for those already on the job.

The details were shared during the June 20 “Action Line” program with host Bart Walker. The live program was broadcast on FM 100.5, 101.9 and AM 1450 from the WGNS studio in downtown Murfreesboro. If you missed it, you can listen to a podcast of the show here.

Guests included:

MTSU faculty and staff appeared on the Monday, June 20, “Action Line” program on WGNS Radio. Guests were, at top from left, Drs. Peggy Carpenter and David Gotcher, University College; bottom right, Dr. Dawn McCormack, College of Liberal Arts; and bottom left, Christy Davis, ACE Learning Center. (MTSU photo illustration)

• Dr. Dawn McCormack, director of the College of Liberal Arts’ Master of Arts in Liberal Arts (MALA) degree program, discussed the growth of this new flexible degree.

MALA allows students to develop skills and expand knowledge in subjects they’re most passionate about pursuing. The program allowing anyone with a bachelor’s degree to earn a graduate degree through a course of study built around subjects they find most captivating.

For more information, email mala@mtsu.edu, 615-898-5986 or visit www.mtsu.edu/mala.

• Christy Davis, new director of the ACE Learning Center at MTSU, discussed the center’s upcoming major fundraiser, which will be more family friendly this year.

The Ann Campbell Early Learning Center, or ACE, is getting ready for its 10th annual “Saddle Up for ACE Learning Center” fundraiser set for 5:30-8 p.m. Friday, July 29, at MTSU’s Murphy Center.

Food will be available from Chick-fil-A, Kroger, Newk’s, Purity Dairies, Publix and more. There will be activities for kids such as a magician, live bee observatory, sensory stations, animals from Discovery Center, horse grooming, straw maze, gigantic coloring book, and more.

For more information, including how to get tickets, go here.

• Dr. David Gotcher, interim dean of MTSU University College, and Dr. Peggy Carpenter, assistant dean of academic outreach for University College, discussed the new Applied Leadership Concentration launching in the fall targeting those already in the workforce.

Working with leading tire and rubber company Bridgestone Americas, MTSU has created the new Applied Leadership certificate program. Bridgestone employees will be among the inaugural group of students in the program, which offers adult learners already on the job a chance to earn additional job certifications — and even a bachelor’s degree — through online courses and short, intensive on-campus instruction.

Read the full story here.

Students, faculty and staff who are interested in guesting on WGNS to promote their MTSU-related activities should contact Jimmy Hart, director of news and media relations, at 615-898-5131 or via email at jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu.

Raptor team’s MTSU talk leaves lasting impression [+VIDEO]

After listening and watching the U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor demonstration team discuss their careers and the power of the stealth aircraft, MTSU senior Mohammed Alzahrani called it “just impressive.”

“Exciting” is how local high school senior Taylor Cowan of Murfreesboro labeled the one-hour-plus presentation by five of the 13-member Raptor flight demonstration team Friday, June 3, at MTSU.

With about 100 people in attendance, including nearly 45 members of area Tennessee Wing Civil Air Patrol composite squadrons for teenagers, Raptor team members left quite an impression on adults and young people alike.

https://youtu.be/zhJgkgRRF2o

The Raptors, who spoke in the Business and Aerospace Building’s State Farm Lecture Hall, are in Rutherford County for the 2016 Great Tennessee Airshow Saturday and Sunday, June 4-5, at Smyrna Airport.

The U.S. Navy Blue Angels were to appear at MTSU, but the group canceled all airshow-related appearances after a June 2 crash that killed U.S. Marine pilot Capt. Jeff Kuss, a Durango, Colorado, native.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Steven Davison, left, and senior airman/weapons specialist Kyara Johnson smile as they listen to a woman discuss their visit to MTSU June 3. Davison and Johnson are part of a 13-member F-22 Raptor team in the area for the Great Tennessee Airshow June 4-5 at Smyrna. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Steven Davison, left, and senior airman/weapons specialist Kyara Johnson smile as they listen to a guest discuss their visit to MTSU June 3. Davison and Johnson are part of a 13-member F-22 Raptor team in the area for the Great Tennessee Airshow June 4-5 at Smyrna. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

Before the Raptor presentation, a moment of silence was held to honor Kuss “for his service to our nation,” said Andrew Oppmann, MTSU vice president of marketing and communications.

Attending Raptor members included:

  • Jonathan Billie, a technical sergeant and spokesman.
  • Steven Davison, a staff sergeant and avionics specialist.
  • DJ Foss, a demonstration pilot.
  • Mahalia Frost, a public affairs officer.
  • Kyara Johnson, a senior airman and weapons specialist who grew up in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Raptor demo teams are known for performing precision aerial maneuvers to demonstrate the unique capabilities of the F-22, which is the world’s only operational fifth-generation fighter aircraft capable at flying at great speeds and altitudes.

The presenters showed video of Dan Dickinson, the scheduled Smyrna airshow demonstration pilot, who was unable to attend because of air show commitments. Dickinson said he has a “special spot in his heart for ROTC cadets. I encourage you to press forward. … It’s an awesome path and opportunity.”

MTSU offers military science in the College of Basic and Applied Sciences and annually produces an outstanding group of ROTC cadets.

Alzahrani, 24, an aerospace professional pilot major from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, said attending the presentation “has been a great experience … to know about their lives, what everyone’s duty is and learn about the air show this weekend.”

Cowan, who is a home-schooled student, is a member of the Civil Air Patrol Smyrna Composite Squadron and an aspiring pilot. Cowan won’t be able to attend the air show because of an encampment activity.

U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor demonstration pilot DJ Foss explains about the speed and power of the aircraft appearing at the Great Tennessee Airshow June 4-5 in Smyrna, Tennessee. The Raptor team spoke at MTSU June 3.

U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor demonstration pilot DJ Foss explains the speed and power of the aircraft appearing at the Great Tennessee Airshow June 4-5 in Smyrna, Tennessee. The Raptor team spoke at MTSU June 3.

“I’m definitely interested in flying, so being here has helped me learn more about it,” Cowan said. “It was good to know their side of things and how much they enjoy it. It made me regret that I’m not going to make it to the air show.”

Other composite squadrons attending included cadet squadrons from Murfreesboro, Nashville and Williamson County.

Foss told the attentive audience that enemy pilots usually don’t detect the combat-ready Raptors until it’s too late.

“We see him long before he knows we are there,” he said.

The team fielded questions from audience members. Billie, who said they enjoy “Heritage Flights,” which pair the F-22s with World War II-type aircraft, noted that he and his colleagues were amazed by several of the teenagers’ detailed questions.

MTSU is the presenting sponsor of the Raptor team’s appearance at the airshow. The Department of Aerospace will have an information booth and aircraft display set up at the Smyrna event.

Raptor air show demonstrations include the power loop, split and tail side as well as a high-speed pass and dedication pass. The maneuvers are based on those designed for combat operations, but performed at much lower altitudes than most pilots are certified to attain.

For more on aerospace’s unique programs — including professional pilot, air traffic control, and unmanned aircraft systems — visit www.mtsu.edu/programs/aerospace.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor demonstration pilot DJ Foss, right, fields audience questions during the team's visit to MTSU June 3. Listening are fellow team members Kyara Johnson, Steven Davison and Jonathan Billie.

U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor demonstration pilot DJ Foss, right, fields audience questions during the team’s visit to MTSU June 3. Listening are fellow team members Kyara Johnson, Steven Davison and Jonathan Billie.

U.S. Air Force tech sergeant Jonathan Billie explains about maneuverability and other aspects of the F-22 Raptor while speaking June 3 in the Business and Aerospace Building's State Farm Lecture Hall.

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Jonathan Billie explains about maneuverability and other aspects of the F-22 Raptor while speaking June 3 in the Business and Aerospace Building’s State Farm Lecture Hall.

MTSU on WGNS: Simulator facility, STEM survey, black history

MTSU faculty and staff took to the radio recently to discuss the dedication of a new flight simulator building and new weather software, results from a STEM workforce survey and a new online resource to help preserve African-American historical sites.

Details were shared during the May 16 WGNS Radio “Action Line” program with host Bart Walker. The live program was broadcast on FM 100.5, 101.9 and AM 1450 from the station’s downtown Murfreesboro studio. If you missed it, you can listen to a podcast of the show here.

  • MTSU aerospace graduate student Leland Waite, left, faculty member Don Crews, interim chair Wendy Beckman and faculty member Jerry Hill discuss the department's newly dedicated flight simulator building and weather software students will begin utilizing in the fall during their May 16 segment on the WGNS radio "Action Line" program. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

    MTSU aerospace graduate student Leland Waite, left, faculty member Don Crews, interim chair Wendy Beckman and faculty member Jerry Hill discuss the department’s newly dedicated flight simulator building and weather software that students will begin utilizing in the fall during their May 16 segment on the WGNS radio “Action Line” program. (MTSU photos by Randy Weiler)

    Dr. Wendy Beckman, interim chair of the Department of Aerospace, faculty members Jerry Hill and Don Crews and graduate student Leland Waite. They discussed the $700,000 simulator building dedicated May 5 at Murfreesboro Airport and weather software.

The 3,600-gross-square-foot facility features a classroom, six briefing rooms, bathrooms and infrastructure to support spaces. It joins other MTSU Flight Operations Center airport facilities. Find the full story here.

Aerospace also has received an aviation operations management solution, WSI Fusion, in the Business and Aerospace Building simulation lab. Students will graduate with a competitive advantage because it is not available at most aviation schools. Find the full story here.

  • Dr. Murat Arik , director of the MTSU Business and Economic and Research Center, or BERC, and graduate student Katherine Stubblefield. They discussed the results of a STEM workforce survey conducted last fall by BERC.
Murfreesboro's Dee Butler, left, whose family lives on a century farm, and Dr. Antoinette Van Zelm of the MTSU Center for Historic Preservation, promote "Preserving African-American Historic Places: Suggestions and Sources." (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

Murfreesboro’s Dee Butler, left, whose family lives on a century farm, and Dr. Antoinette Van Zelm of the MTSU Center for Historic Preservation, promote “Preserving African-American Historic Places: Suggestions and Sources.”

A survey of businesses, mayors, local economic development officials, and school principals suggests that Tennessee faces significant challenges in the STEM workforce supply, pipeline and infrastructure, the report states.

Among the BERC’s key survey findings is that Tennessee faces an employment and skills gap in STEM areas. As of 2013, the size of the STEM workforce in Tennessee was an estimated 324,328, but the report characterized that workforce as “an oversupply of a low-skilled STEM workforce relative to the U.S. average.” An additional 16,000 jobs could be created by upgrading the STEM skill set of the current workforce. Find the full story here.

  • Dr. Antoinette Van Zelm, assistant director of MTSU’s Center for Historic Preservation, and Dee Butler, whose family has a Rutherford County Century Farm. They discussed a new online resource to help preserve African-American historical sites.

“Preserving African-American Historic Places: Suggestions and Sources” is an omnibus online site with information on collections care, museum management, heritage tourism and fundraising. You can find it here.

One example of a site the CHP already has helped to preserve is Griggs Hall, the first building constructed in 1923 on Nashville’s American Baptist College’s campus.

Other potential preservation sites include businesses, cemeteries, churches, farms, homes, neighborhoods and lodges. Find the full story here.

Students, faculty and staff who are interested in guesting on WGNS to promote their MTSU-related activities should contact Jimmy Hart, director of news and media relations, at 615-898-5131 or via email at jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu.

— Jimmy Hart (Jimmy.Hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU Business and Economic Research Center director Murat Arik, left, and graduate student Katherine Stubblefield reveal results from BERC's STEM workforce survey.

MTSU Business and Economic Research Center director Murat Arik, left, and graduate student Katherine Stubblefield reveal results from BERC’s STEM workforce survey.

MTSU on WGNS: Lifelong Learning, migrant exhibit, women’s expo

MTSU faculty and staff took to the radio recently to discuss an upcoming series of classes open to the community, an ongoing exhibit about Midstate migrants and an upcoming showcase targeting women entrepreneurs.

The details were shared during the April 18 “Action Line” program with host Scott Walker. The live program was broadcast on FM 100.5, 101.9 and AM 1450 from the WGNS studio in downtown Murfreesboro. If you missed it, you can listen to a podcast of the show here.

Guests included:

MTSU guests for the April 18 WGNS "Action Line" program are, top left, from left, students Joy Rogers, Dalton Cantrell, Mia Kozul, Sam Hulsey and Global Stuies professor Dr. Antonia Vasquez; at right, Connie Huddleston, College of Liberal Arts; bottom right, from left, small business owners Latoya Bennett, Shalonda Brown and Meichelle Gibson. (MTSU photo illustration)

MTSU guests for the April 18 WGNS “Action Line” program are, top left, from left, students Joy Rogers, Dalton Cantrell, Mia Kozul, Sam Hulsey and Global Stuies professor Dr. Antonia Vasquez; at right, Connie Huddleston, College of Liberal Arts; bottom right, from left, small business owners Latoya Bennett, Shalonda Brown and Meichelle Gibson. (MTSU photo illustration)

• Connie Huddleston, coordinator for the College of Liberal Arts, discussed the College of Liberal Arts’ Lifelong Learning Program that starts up again in May.

The homework-free, exam-free classroom experience for older learners is slated for four Mondays — May 2, 9, 16 and 23 — in the Ingram Building, located at 2269 Middle Tennessee Blvd. in Murfreesboro.

Classes in “The Civil War” will take place from 9 to 10:30 a.m. “The History of American Sports” is slated for 10:45 a.m. to noon. “The Philosophy of Happiness” is scheduled for 12:15 to 1:45 p.m.

Learn more here.

• Dr. Antonio Vasquez, professor in the Global Studies and Cultural Geography program, and MTSU student Sam Hulsey, exhibit co-coordinator, along with students Mia Kozul, Dalton Cantrell and Joy Rogers.

The student-led “Migration with Dignity in Middle Tennessee” multimedia exhibit will be open through April 27 at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County, 225 W. College St. in downtown Murfreesboro.

Free and open to the public, the exhibit includes 17 individual testimonies of migrants and their families from different countries of origin who now all call Tennessee their home. Several pieces of student artwork from MTSU professor Sisavanh Houghton’s painting class, as well as video excerpts, are included in the exhibit.

Learn more here.

• Shalonda Brown, owner of The Couture Experience by Shalon (TCES); Latoya Bennett, owner of Ellie Colour wardrobe stylist firm; and Meichelle Gibson, co-owner of Gibson Consulting and Entertainment Group (GCEG), discuss the upcoming “Couture Experience Women in Business Showcase,” a free expo for women.

The showcase will be held from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 30, at the MT Center in the Sam H. Ingram Building on Middle Tennessee Boulevard. The event is part of MTSU’s celebration of National Women’s History Month and is being co-sponsored by the June Anderson Center for Women and Nontraditional Students at MTSU.

The Couture Experience is designed to highlight women who are new in business that focus on health, wellness, beauty and fashion. This free half-day power-packed, informative, interactive expo features foods, products, services and strategies for the new/aspiring business owner.

Students, faculty and staff who are interested in guesting on WGNS to promote their MTSU-related activities should contact Jimmy Hart, director of news and media relations, at 615-898-5131 or via email at jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu.