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Professor makes words of ancient poet sing on ‘MTSU On the Record’

An MTSU professor whose musical compositions give voice to the words of a first-century B.C. poet will be the guest on the next edition of the “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. Michael Linton

Dr. Michael Linton

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Michael Linton will air from 5:30 to 6 p.m. Monday, March 2, and from 8 to 8:30 a.m. Sunday, March 8, on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ).

This bust of late Roman poet Gaius Valerius Catullus is on the Piazza Carducci in Sirmione in the Lombardy region of northern Italy.

This bust of late Roman poet Gaius Valerius Catullus is on the Piazza Carducci in Sirmione in the Lombardy region of northern Italy.

Linton, a professor of music theory, wrote the music for “Carmina Catulli,” a CD of songs using the poetry of Gaius Valerius Catullus, one of the most acclaimed poets of the ancient world. Tracks from the album are integrated into the broadcast.

Catullus, a contemporary of Julius Caesar, explored the depths of human emotion, ranging from unbridled sexual passion to painful melancholy.

Jason Paul Peterson provided the piano accompaniment, and baritone Edwin Crossley-Mercer sang Catullus’ words in the original Latin. MTSU recording industry professor Michael Fleming produced the CD.

“Some of the movements, which you really certainly can call ‘atonal,’ are just the way I write,” said Linton, “and some are completely tonal and lyric.

“One of the things you have to do when you put together a dramatic work like this … is you have to have a variety of long things and short things, happy things and sad things, loud, slow, fast, soft. You need that variety.”

Writing for Opera News, the publication of the Metropolitan Opera Guild in New York, critic Joshua Rosenblum called Linton’s work “music of an eclectic but coherent and distinctive style, contemporary but otherworldly.”

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com/ontherecord/.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

Deadline extended to apply for grants for women-focused courses

Money to infuse courses with the experiences and perspectives of women is available at MTSU for university faculty with a new application deadline.

PCSW graphic webMonday, March 16, is now the deadline for faculty to apply for the Curriculum Integration Grants offered by the university’s President’s Commission on the Status of Women.

The commission will award three grants worth $1,800 each to support revising a course or a general-education course for a study-abroad program, creating a new course, reconceptualizing a current minor or creating a new minor.

Applicants are encouraged to include how women’s concerns intersect with aspects of race/ethnicity, class and sexual orientation. The 2014 grant winners came from MTSU’s human sciences, music and English departments.

Dr. Lauren Rudd

Dr. Lauren Rudd

Dr. Lauren Rudd, an assistant professor of textiles, management and design, used her funding to revise “Social Aspects of Clothing,” a course that examines the cultural, psychological, sociological and economic impacts of clothing and textiles.

“Big designers have been using cultural influences in their runway designs for several years now,” Rudd said. “The students see this, but have no concept of the traditions and importance related to those cultures.

“They also need to be able to design, style, merchandise and sell apparel-related product to a global audience.”

Dr. Deanna Little, a professor of music at MTSU, revamped the “Private Instruction in Flute” course to educate her students on the proportions of males and females in the profession.

Dr. Deanna Little

Dr. Deanna Little

“As a woman flutist, performer and teacher, I feel it is important to bring awareness of the realities of the profession to my students,” Little said. “This will prepare them better for future careers in music and hopefully empower them to succeed.”

Little said the history of both flute and music composition shows more men at the top of the profession than women, although the ratio of men to women at the top is inconsistent with the ratio of men to women in the profession as a whole.

Dr. Elyce Helford, a professor of English, created “Topics in Sexuality: Queer Studies” to “explore the history and diverse uses of the concept ‘queer’ in local and global contexts.”

Dr. Elyce Helford

Dr. Elyce Helford

“When we study what theorists and activists call ‘queer,’ we are studying those identifications, attractions, attitudes and appearances that resist simple boundaries, such as ‘straight/gay’ or ‘masculine/feminine,’” said Helford.

“Queer studies, therefore, helps us to think outside restrictive labels for self and world,” she added.

Little’s course began this spring. Rudd’s course is scheduled for summer 2015 semester, and Helford’s class is slated to begin in 2016.

Courses developed or revised for the undergraduate curriculum, and those that can be implemented within two years, will receive priority consideration for the grants. Only faculty who have not received a Curriculum Integration Grant in the past four years are eligible to apply.

Proposals should include innovative teaching techniques. The commission is particularly encouraging proposals that engage students in a better understanding of violence against women in the wake of the recent reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act.

Complete application guidelines are available at www.mtsu.edu/pcsw/grants.php.

Inquiries should be directed to Dr. Leah Tolbert Lyons at 615-898-2982 or leah.lyons@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU professor’s lecture to examine ‘Orange is the New Black’ Feb. 26

An MTSU professor will peek behind the prison bars of the Netflix series “Orange is the New Black” in an upcoming lecture set Thursday, Feb. 26.

Dr. Clare Bratten

Dr. Clare Bratten

Dr. Clare Bratten, a professor in the Department of Electronic Media Communication, will present “Orange is the New Black: How We Talk About the Show” at 3 p.m. Feb. 26 in Room 100 of the James Union Building.

The comedy-drama follows the plight of Piper Chapman, a woman who loses her comfortable New York life when she is convicted in connection with a youthful indiscretion.

Plots revolve around how she adjusts to a life of prison privation and an array of quirky fellow inmates and guards.

“Orange is the New Black” has been nominated for numerous awards and won a Peabody Award in 2013.

OITNB graphic webThe show also won the award for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series at the 2015 Screen Actors Guild Awards ceremony and the 2014 Emmy Award for Outstanding Casting for a Comedy Series.

Uzo Aduba, who portrays Suzanne “Crazy Eyes” Warren, captured the 2015 SAG award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series as well as the 2014 Emmy for Oustanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series.

“The talk explores whether the wildly popular series … is a soap opera-styled serial, a socially conscious critique of prison life or a continuation of a ‘Women In Prison’ genre that began in the early days of Hollywood,” Bratten said.

Bratten’s free public presentation is the latest in MTSU’s Women’s and Gender Studies Research Series.

For more information, contact the Women’s and Gender Studies office at 615-898-5910 or womenstu@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Media center director talks innovations on ‘MTSU On the Record’

The person at the helm of MTSU’s incubator for budding journalists will be the guest on the next edition of the “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Val Hoeppner, director of MTSU’s Center for Innovation in Media in the College of Mass Communication, will air from 8 to 8:30 a.m. Sunday, March 1, on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ).

Val Hoeppner

Val Hoeppner

Hoeppner is in charge of operations for all student media at the center, which houses student radio station WMTS-FM; student-operated television station MT10; and student-run record label Match Records, as well as National Public Radio affiliate WMOT-FM.

Click on the logo to visit the Center for Innovation in Media website.

Click on the logo to visit the Center for Innovation in Media website.

A veteran of 20 years as a photojournalist and multimedia director at the Indianapolis Star, Hoeppner served as director of education for the Freedom Forum Diversity Institute for five years prior to joining MTSU.

Hoeppner said she is most proud of the students who created an iPad application for MTSU’s Center for Popular Music located inside the John Bragg Mass Communication Building and filled it with content during the fall 2014 semester.

“You can … get a full panoramic tour of the center,” said Hoeppner. “There’s an interactive timeline in there. There are several videos produced by the students and of course writing done by the students.”

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com/ontherecord/.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

MTSU professor brings ‘Kennewick Man’ to life in book about discovery

An MTSU professor’s contribution to a new book has helped alter the discussion about the origins of humankind on the North American continent.

Dr. Hugh Berryman is the author of a chapter in “Kennewick Man: The Scientific Investigation of an Ancient American Skeleton,” which was published in late 2014 by Texas A&M University Press.

Dr. Hugh E. Berryman of MTSU, at right, and his colleagues discuss the Kennewick Man discovery in this 2005 file photo from the Smithsonian Institution. Seated from left are geochemist Thomas Stafford of the University of Wisconsin; C. Wayne Smith, curation specialist, Texas A&M; attorney Alan L. Schneider; and Smithsonian anthropologist Douglas W. Owsley. (photo courtesy Smithsonian Institution/Chip Clark)

Dr. Hugh E. Berryman of MTSU, at right, and his colleagues discuss the Kennewick Man discovery in this 2005 file photo from the Smithsonian Institution. Seated from left are geochemist Thomas Stafford of the University of Wisconsin; C. Wayne Smith, curation specialist, Texas A&M; attorney Alan L. Schneider; and Smithsonian anthropologist Douglas W. Owsley. (Photo courtesy Smithsonian Institution/Chip Clark)

Berryman, a research professor and forensic anthropologist, was one of 11 top American researchers who collaborated in the 2005-06 examination of a nearly 9,000-year-old skeleton that forced the scientific community to rethink the history of the peopling of the Americas.

“It’s allowed a window into not just a time but perhaps a group of people that we really were not aware of,” said Berryman, who also is director of MTSU’s Forensic Institute for Research and Education.

The more than 300 bones and bone fragments were discovered accidentally in 1996 by two teenagers along the Columbia River at Kennewick, Washington.

Under the direction of Dr. Douglas Owsley, head of the Division of Physical Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution’s Museum of Natural History, the experts scrutinized the bones.

Dr. Hugh Berryman

Dr. Hugh Berryman

Remarkably, the bones were in excellent shape, having survived centuries of weather, insects, animals, erosion and human activity. Owsley called it “as complete a skeleton as has been found in North America.”

Dubbing the skeleton “Kennewick Man,” the scientists determined that this hardy, rugged individual lived into his mid- to late-30s and that his right arm was stronger than his left because he threw spears with his right arm as a hunter.

In fact, Kennewick Man died with the point of a spear stuck into his right hip, although Berryman said that injury did not cause his death.

The details of Kennewick Man’s life could lead to a definitive determination of his ethnic origins. The bones reveal that some of his physical characteristics didn’t resemble those of Native Americans.

“Maybe we’re dealing with a group that came into North America by living off the sea and moving around from Asia into North America,” said Berryman, a faculty member in MTSU’s Department of Sociology and Anthropology.

Kennewick Man’s facial features more closely resemble those of the Ainu, an aboriginal Japanese group of people who have different ethnic characteristics from other Japanese, than those of Native American tribes, Berryman said.

“Bone is great at recording its own history,” Berryman said in a 2006 MTSU News story shortly after Kennewick Man was studied. “Throughout your life, there are different things that you do, and they may leave little signs in the bone. If you can read those signs, it’s almost like interviewing a person.”

Dr. Douglas Owsley

The bones of Kennewick Man, a nearly 9,000-year-old skeleton whose origins could rewrite history. Dr. Hugh Berryman, an MTSU forensic anthropologist, was one of the scientists who examined the bones and recorded his findings in a new book. (Photo courtesy of Smithsonian Institution)

The bones of Kennewick Man, a nearly 9,000-year-old skeleton whose origins could rewrite history, are shown in this Smithsonian Institution photo. Dr. Hugh Berryman, an MTSU forensic anthropologist, was one of the scientists who examined the bones and recorded his findings in a new book.

Owsley, who co-authored the book with Richard L. Jantz, has known Berryman since 1973, when they picked apart human remains as students at the University of Tennessee’s “Body Farm.” He said Berryman immediately came to mind as the person to scrutinize these rare bones.

“Berryman wrote a spectacular chapter for the volume,” Owsley said. “I am firmly convinced that no other scientist could have read the fracture patterning as carefully and thoroughly.”

The chapter written by Berryman has the somewhat murky title of “Postmortem Breakage as a Taphonomic Tool for Determining Kennewick Man’s Burial Position.”

In short, Berryman examined the bones to figure out how they broke and under what conditions. With that knowledge, he was able to determine that Kennewick Man was buried in a supine position — face up, lying on the back, as most

“It takes some energy to dig a hole even with a modern-day shovel, let alone a digging stick,” said Berryman, whose expertise frequently leads to requests for his testimony in criminal trials.

“If you’re buried, that tends to imply that you had somebody that cared something about you.”

Who were those people? Perhaps future study will reveal conclusive answers to that question. The Kennewick Man story has not been completely written.

“I don’t want the discussion to end here,” said Owsley. “I expect there to be different opinions. It will set a standard in terms of how much you can determine after the fact.”

Owsley is scheduled to visit MTSU as the William M. Bass Legends in Forensic Science Lecturer at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 3, in the Student Union Ballroom. His subject will be “Seriously Amazing Moments in Smithsonian Research.”

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

WGNS spotlights MTSU anthropology and history projects, changing media

MTSU faculty and staff took to the airwaves recently to discuss a university anthropological research project in Brazil, a history project focused on documenting the storied past of a local public school, and ongoing efforts to raise awareness of the First Amendment.

Pat Embry

Pat Embry

Dr. Brenden Martin

Dr. Brenden Martin

Dr. Richard Pace

Dr. Richard Pace

Listeners of WGNS radio heard details on these efforts during the Feb. 16 “Action Line” program with veteran host Bart Walker. The live program was broadcast on FM 100.5, 101.9 and AM 1450 from the WGNS studio in downtown Murfreesboro.

If you missed it, you can listen to a podcast of the show here. Guests included:

  • MTSU anthropology professor Dr. Richard Pace talked about the ongoing media research in Brazil and how this has now developed into the InDigital Latin America Conference co-sponsored by MTSU and Vanderbilt University to be held on the Vanderbilt campus March 26-28. Part of the planned events is a screening and Q&A session by two Kayapo filmmakers and anthropologist Glenn Shepard at MTSU March 24 sponsored by the Distinguished Speaker Series. The Kayapo are a well-known tribe from the Brazilian Amazon who were featured in National Geographic (January 2013). MTSU will have top scholars of indigenous media presenting their work at the conference.
  • MTSU history professor Dr. Brenden Martin discussed a project in which MTSU graduate students are seeking assistance from Murfreesboro and Rutherford County residents in preserving the history of what is now Central Magnet School. Martin is guiding the students as they interview teachers and alumni, seek donations of artifacts and peruse documents and photos from the campus’s nearly 175-year history. An interpretive exhibit will be placed in the magnet school’s “College Corner” in the western side of the building. MTSU students also will create a website where audio, video and still images will be posted. Read the full story here.
  • Pat Embry, new director of the John Seigenthaler Chair of Excellence in First Amendment Studies in the MTSU College of Mass Communication, talked about his role since taking the reins last summer and how technology has changed media. The Seigenthaler Chair supports a variety of activities related to free speech, free press rights and other topics of concern for contemporary journalism. The Seigenthaler Chair recently sponsored a Feb. 10 public forum at MTSU’s Tucker Theatre entitled “From the Front Lines of Ferguson: Covering the New Civil Rights Movement.” Read a recap of that event here.

Students, faculty and staff who are interested in guesting on WGNS to promote their MTSU-related activities should contact Jimmy Hart, director of news and media relations, at 615-898-5131 or via email at jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu.

‘MTSU On the Record’ looks in on CEO salaries with finance professor

A professor shared a unique perspective on corporations’ chief executive officers and their sharp increases in pay over the past few decades on a recent edition of the “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. Greg Nagel

Dr. Greg Nagel

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Greg Nagel, assistant professor of finance in the MTSU Department of Economics and Finance, first aired Feb. 16 on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ). You can listen to their conversation here.

Nagel’s research paper, “The Overconfidence of Boards and the Increase in CEO Pay Over Time,” was published in the November/December 2014 issue of The Journal of Applied Business Research.

He asserts that executives’ pay has skyrocketed tenfold since 1980 because of corporate boards’ misplaced confidence in candidates outside their own ranks.

Nagel also learned that the use of external search firms to select candidates has increased CEOs’ bargaining power, enabling them to jump from firm to firm without needing to improve their companies to gain higher salaries.

“Executive search firms needed executives from other firms in order to make their business work,” said Nagel. “And they usually get about a third of the first year’s cash pay when they place somebody. And they get more if they place an outsider.”

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com/ontherecord/.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

MTSU appoints special adviser for veterans, leadership initiatives

Lt. Gen. Keith M. Huber, who recently retired from the U.S. Army after almost 40 years of service, joins MTSU this semester as senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives.

Retired Lt. Gen. Keith Huber chats with attendees at Thursday's reception inside the Tom H. Jackson Building to welcome him to the MTSU campus. Huber joins MTSU this semester as senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Retired Lt. Gen. Keith Huber chats with attendees at Thursday’s reception inside the Tom H. Jackson Building to welcome him to the MTSU campus. Huber joins MTSU this semester as senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

President Sidney A. McPhee and Provost Brad Bartel welcomed Huber to the Murfreesboro campus Thursday (Feb. 5), holding a reception for the general in the Tom H. Jackson Building, just near MTSU’s Veterans Memorial.

McPhee said Huber will examine the university’s policies and practices for the recruitment and student success of veterans and their family members.

“We are proud that MTSU has been recognized year after year by national publications — such as Military Times and G.I. Jobs Magazine — as being one of the top universities in the U.S. for veteran education,” McPhee said.

“But we also recognize that there is much that needs to be done here at our university to better serve this important community.”

Huber’s 38 years of service included most recently command of the Combined Joint Interagency Task Force 435 in Afghanistan.

He also served as a company commander, battalion operations officer, brigade and division operations officer, battalion commander and director of civil-military affairs with the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell.

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

Huber graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1975 and received a Master of Public Administration degree from Golden State University in 1984.

“I am appreciative of this opportunity to continue to serve our veterans,” Huber said. “I acknowledge and admire the True Blue spirit and the current environment at MTSU and how they treat our veterans and their precious family members.”

McPhee said Huber’s “vast military experience, his ability to tackle and excel in often challenging situations and his devotion to the men and women who have served our nation in our Armed Forces give him a unique perspective and the tools necessary to help us become a national leader in veteran education.”

Huber will reside in the Provost’s office. However, Bartel said, he serves “as a direct adviser to both the president and me as he explores ways for us to become a more valuable resource to veterans and their families.

“We are already meeting regularly and I am very pleased by the strong start he has made in such a short time on campus,” Bartel said.

Among those in attendance at Thursday’s reception was Many-Bears Grinder, commissioner for the Tennessee Department of Veterans Affairs.

— Andrew Oppmann (andrew.oppmann@mtsu.edu)

Retired Lt. Gen. Keith Huber, left, is welcomed to the MTSU campus by Provost Brad Bartel during a reception held Thursday, Feb. 5, inside the Tom H. Jackson Building. Huber joins MTSU this semester as senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives and will be working out of the Provost's Office. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Retired Lt. Gen. Keith Huber, left, is welcomed to the MTSU campus by Provost Brad Bartel during a reception held Thursday, Feb. 5, inside the Tom H. Jackson Building. Huber joins MTSU this semester as senior adviser for veterans and leadership initiatives and will be working out of the Provost’s Office. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Branam settles in as new MTSU director of development

Middle Tennessee State University has hired Patricia “Pat” Branam to strengthen its successful fundraising efforts as its new director of development.

Branam, who assumed her new role Jan. 5, previously served as associate vice chancellor and interim vice chancellor at the University of Tennessee-Chattanooga and as a constituent development officer and assistant dean at the University of Cincinnati.

Pat Branam

Pat Branam

Joe Bales

Joe Bales

At UTC, Branam helped the university exceed its fundraising campaign in recent years, managed the university’s foundation of more than $100 million in assets and instituted campus-based annual giving programs.

“Pat brings a wealth of expertise to the position and is an accomplished fundraiser and administrator,” said Joe Bales, vice president for university advancement at MTSU.

“She will greatly enhance our knowledge and experience base, and I am confident she will be an outstanding mentor, educator and professional resource for our staff and volunteers.”

As director, Branam will play a key role in support of MTSU’s ongoing Centennial Campaign and new fundraising initiatives. She will also manage the efforts of the university’s other development directors in the MTSU Development and Foundation Office.

“It is an honor to join the outstanding fundraising team of campus leaders, deans, college development officers, and campaign volunteers who have been leading MTSU in achieving important goals of the Centennial Campaign,” Branam said.

“They have achieved ground-breaking success, and together we can build an even stronger base of philanthropic support for the innovative initiatives MTSU is fostering campuswide.”

Branam’s family has been based in Chattanooga. Her husband, Gene, is a retired prototype model maker. Their daughter, Amanda B. Dunn, is a litigation attorney with Luther-Anderson PLLP, and their son, Matt, is an assistant manager with Opus.

The Branams are self-professed soccer fanatics with football taking a close second.

Branam can be reached at pat.branam@mtsu.edu.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

UPDATE: Hodge is speaker at archaeology group’s 1st meeting

MTSU professor Dr. Shannon Hodge will now be the featured speaker at the inaugural meeting of the new Rutherford County Archaeological Society.

The group’s first meeting will be held at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 29, at the Heritage Center, 225 W. College St., in downtown Murfreesboro.

MTSU's Dr. Shannon Hodge, right, a bioarchaeologist, was interviewed recently by Channel 4 reporter Dennis Ferrier, seated left, about her work to help find answers about an unmarked cemetery discovered on the grounds of the Nashville Zoo. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

MTSU’s Dr. Shannon Hodge, right, a bioarchaeologist, was interviewed recently by Channel 4 reporter Dennis Ferrier, seated left, about her work to help find answers about an unmarked cemetery discovered on the grounds of the Nashville Zoo. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

Hodge is replacing Dr. Tanya M. Peres, who was originally scheduled to give a special presentation entitled “Prehistory Beneath Our Feet: Doing Archaeology in Rutherford County, Tennessee.”

Due to unforeseen circumstances, however, Peres will be unable to attend Thursday’s meeting but is scheduled to speak at the group’s February meeting.

Peres is director of the Rutherford County Archaeology Research Program and an associate professor of anthropology at MTSU.

Dr. Shannon Hodge

Dr. Shannon Hodge

Hodge, an expert bioarchaeologist and an associate professor of anthropology at MTSU, will present “Nashville Zoo Cemetery: Revealing the Unknown Through Bioarchaeology and DNA.” Her work at the zoo was featured in a recent report on WSMV-TV Channel 4 in Nashville.

Hodge specializes in human osteology and paleopathology. Her recent work has focused on interpersonal violence and trophy-taking, African Diaspora populations and Native Americans of the Archaic and Mississippian periods.

“We’re open to anyone interested in archaeology,” archaeologist Laura Fyock Bartel, founder of the group, told NewsRadio WGNS. “Our focus is on the archaeology and cultural heritage of the county, as well as archaeological and anthropological topics in general.”

Bartel is a Murfreesboro resident and anthropology instructor at Motlow State Community College.

WGNS reported that Peres’ presentation will provide an overview of archaeology in Rutherford County, discuss two recently identified prehistoric archaeological sites, including one in Murfreesboro, and share how the public can get involved in order to help document the county’s ancient past before it is lost to growth and development.

For more information on the Rutherford County Archaeological Society, go to facebook.com/groups/RCAS.TN or contact Laura Bartel at lbanthro@gmail.com.

In this 2014 file photo, MTSU archaeologist Dr. Tanya Peres, director of the MTSU Summer Archaeology Field School, explains the excavation process at Magnolia Valley equestrian farm in Eagleville, Tennessee. MTSU invited community members to visit the excavation site to see the students' work. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

In this 2014 file photo, MTSU archaeologist Dr. Tanya Peres, director of the MTSU Summer Archaeology Field School, explains the excavation process at Magnolia Valley equestrian farm in Eagleville, Tennessee. MTSU invited community members to visit the excavation site to see the students’ work. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)