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MTSU on WGNS: Gang symposium, Confucius Day, ‘Bleed Blue’ drive

MTSU faculty and staff took to the radio recently to share information about an upcoming blood drive competition, gang symposium and celebration honoring one of the world’s great philosophers.

The details were shared during the Sept. 19 “Action Line” program with host Bart Walker. The live program was broadcast on FM 100.5, 101.9 and AM 1450 from the WGNS studio in downtown Murfreesboro. If you missed it, you can listen to a podcast of the show here.

Guests included:

• Ray Wiley, associate director of MTSU Campus Recreation and longtime Red Cross volunteer, and Patti Wright, senior representative for the American Red Cross’ Tennessee Valley Region, discussed the “Bleed BLUE, Beat WKU Blood Drive” set Oct. 3-5.

The Blue Raider community will again be competing against supporters of our fellow Conference USA member Western Kentucky University. Last year, MTSU’s drive resulted in 517 pints of blood to WKU’s 436 during the three-day annual event. This year’s goal is collecting 700 more pints during the three-day drive in MTSU’s Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center.

From left, Ray Wiley, associate director of MTSU Campus Recreation and longtime Red Cross volunteer, and Patti Wright, senior representative for the American Red Cross’ Tennessee Valley Region, at WGNS Radio in downtown Murfreesboro. (MTSU photo)

From left, Ray Wiley, associate director of MTSU Campus Recreation and longtime Red Cross volunteer, and Patti Wright, senior representative for the American Red Cross’                                               xTennessee Valley Region, at WGNS Radio in downtown Murfreesboro. (MTSU photo)

• Dr. Michael Sherr, professor and new chair of the Department of Social Work, and Dr. Barbara Turnage, a social work professor, discussed the Symposium on Gang Violence set for Sept. 21.

MT Engage, a program focused on enhancing student engagement, is sponsoring the symposium on gang violence reduction hosted by the Department of Criminal Justice Administration and the Department of Social Work from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 21, in the Student Union’s Parliamentary Room. The symposium is free and open to the public.

Read more here.

From left, Dr. Barbara Turnage and Dr. Michael Sherr at WGNS Radio in downtown Murfreesboro. (MTSU photo)

From left, Dr. Barbara Turnage and Dr. Michael Sherr at WGNS Radio in downtown Murfreesboro. (MTSU photo)

• Dr. Mei Han, director of the Center for Chinese Music and Culture at MTSU and a master of the “zheng” Chinese instrument, discussed the Confucius Day Celebration set for Sept. 21 at MTSU’s Wright Music Building.

Dr. Mei Han, director of the Center for Chinese Music and Culture at MTSU, at WGNS in downtown Murfreesboro. (MTSU photo)

Dr. Mei Han, director of the Center for Chinese Music and Culture at MTSU, at WGNS in downtown Murfreesboro. (MTSU photo)

The Center for Chinese Music and Culture will host the celebration at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 21, in Hinton Hall. Center music instructors will perform on a variety of Chinese musical instruments and accompany traditional dance and poetry.

Meanwhile, the Center for Chinese Music and Culture continues to develop its programs since its March 2016 grand opening as the first and only center of its kind in North America. Located on the first floor of the multipurpose Miller Education Center at 503 Bell St., visitors to the 3,200-square-foot center will see a library, an archive, classrooms and a musical instrument gallery.

Read more here.

Students, faculty and staff who are interested in guesting on WGNS to promote their MTSU-related activities should contact Jimmy Hart, director of news and media relations, at 615-898-5131 or via email at jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu.

‘MTSU On the Record’ increases its word power with professor’s research

A recent “MTSU On the Record” radio program stressed the importance of expanding children’s vocabularies to help them become better readers.

Dr. Eric Osland

Dr. Eric Osland

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Eric Oslund, an assistant professor of elementary and secondary education, first aired Sept. 19 on WMOT-FM/Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org. You can listen to their conversation below.

WMOT-new web logoOslund, who also works in MTSU’s doctoral program in literary studies, co-authored the research published in the academic journal “Learning and Individual Difference” with four colleagues.

The study analyzed how vocabulary influences the reading comprehension of seventh- and eighth-graders who come from low-income families that qualify for free or reduced-price school meals.

“I think we need to dedicate resources that people from low SES (socioeconomic status) backgrounds may not have: programs that get books into their hands that cover a variety of topics and training parents or teaching parents on the importance of talking to their children, exposing them to as many words as possible,” said Oslund.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

‘MTSU On the Record’ examines students’ business ethics

The likelihood of college students to employ business ethics outside the classroom is the focus of the next “MTSU On the Record” radio program, which is moving to new airtimes on its regular days.

Dr. Thomas Tang

Dr. Thomas Tang

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Tom Tang, a professor in the Department of Management, first aired Sept. 12 on WMOT-FM/Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org. You can listen to their conversation below.

business ethics illus webTang’s study, which was published in the February 2016 issue of the “Journal of Business Ethics,” explores the impact of a chapter of business ethics in a college business course.

The professor found that this brief introduction to business ethics results in a positive relationship to students’ personal values toward making money.

Those whose high love of money is deeply rooted in their value system because of how they were raised, however, don’t appear to greatly change their appreciation of business ethics because of the instruction.

“According to my data, personal values (don’t) change that much,” said Tang, “so business ethics education is very important. We need to continue focusing on experiential things a little bit more in order to sink it in.

“A long-term organization development program is needed to break down students’ resistance to change and enhance students’ ethical decision-making,” the professor added.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

https://youtu.be/EynyGgfLokw

Business dean Urban named local United Way ‘Volunteer of the Month’

United Way of Rutherford and Cannon Counties has recognized Dr. David Urban, dean of the Jennings A. Jones College of Business, as the nonprofit’s Volunteer of the Month for September.

“I support United Way because it provides the most efficient and effective way to leverage human and financial resources that will positively impact our community in life-changing ways,” said Urban, according to the United Way’s website.

Dr. David Urban

Dr. David Urban

At MTSU, Urban has been a strong advocate since his arrival in 2013 of the University’s annual charitable giving campaign, a campuswide initiative to secure donations to area nonprofits including United Way.

united-way-rutherford-logo_webUrban is a board member and chair of the Workforce Engagement Committee for the United Way. He began working with the local United Way in 2014 as a member of the Development Committee.

According to United Way, Urban recently volunteered for the agency’s Stuff the Bus Sort-a-Thon and conducted trainings for the Workforce Engagement Committee and community advocates. Prior to relocating to Murfreesboro, Urban volunteered at the United Way in Richmond, Virginia.

For more information about United Way of Rutherford and Cannon Counties, visit http://www.yourlocaluw.org.

Debate coach to lead state communication association

An MTSU professor will assume the reins of the state’s top organization of communication professionals this month.

Dr. Patrick Richey

Dr. Patrick Richey

Dr. Pat Richey, an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies and Organizational Communication and director of forensics, will become president of the Tennessee Communication Association after its annual convention Sept. 9-10 at the Renaissance Center at Freed-Hardeman University in Dickson, Tennessee.

TCA is an organization of scholars who share research and teaching trends in communication studies, organizational communication, public relations, mass communication and film studies.

Tenn Communication Association logo web“It’s a small but very friendly convention,” said Richey. “It puts a lot of emphasis also on student scholarship.”

Richey said he expects around 100 faculty and students to attend the academic conference for presentation of scholarly papers and panel discussions. He said the MTSU contingent should number around 15.

Richey will serve a one-year term, succeeding current president Marci Sayler Nimick, an instructor of speech at Walters State Community College.

He took over the MTSU debate team in 2011. In 2012, the university hosted its first debate tournament in nearly a decade.

Since then, the team has won numerous regional and national honors in both National Parliamentary Debate Association and International Public Debate Association formats.

Richey earned his bachelor’s degree from Louisiana College in 2005, his master’s degree from Stephen F. Austin State University in 2007 and his doctorate from the University of Southern Mississippi in 2012.

For more information about MTSU forensics or the TCA, contact Richey at 615-898-2273 or patrick.richey@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU, Motlow pitch mechatronics programs in workforce training

MTSU’s Walter Boles loves all the attention the Department of Engineering Technology’s mechatronics engineering program suddenly is receiving.

The chair of one of the state’s fastest-growing programs joined Motlow College’s Fred Rascoe for an “Inside Workforce Development” taping Tuesday, Sept. 6, at WTVF-TV in Nashville.

The show will air at 9:30 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 8, and Saturday, Sept. 10, at 7:30 a.m. — plus encore airings — on NewsChannel5+ on Comcast channel 250, Charter channel 182 and digital 5.2. It also can be viewed via www.newschannel5.com.

Boles participated in the seventh Tennessee Department of Education’s Technical Education Cluster Collaborative Wednesday, Sept. 7, at the Northfield Workforce Development & Conference Center in Spring Hill, Tennessee.

“Inside Workforce Development” host Chris Cannon, left, Motlow College’s Fred Rascoe and MTSU’s Walter Boles discuss mechatronics programs at both schools during a television taping Sept. 6 in Nashville. (Photo by Rick Casebeer)

“Inside Workforce Development” host Chris Cannon, left, Motlow College’s Fred Rascoe and MTSU’s Walter Boles discuss mechatronics programs at both schools during a television taping Sept. 6 in Nashville. (Photo by Rick Casebeer)

Mechatronics engineering is a multidisciplinary field of engineering with a combination of systems in mechanical, electrical, telecommunications, control and computer engineering.

Mechatronics is based on a three-level international certification program created by Siemens, a German engineering company. To date, MTSU is the only Siemens-certified Level 3 four-year program in the world.

MTSU Wordmark
Boles said that his goal for the “Inside Workforce Development” TV taping is to share how “automation and robotics have grown tremendously over the past 40 years, and the growth/applications has exploded in recent years with no sign of slowing down.”

motlow-state-logo-horizontal“Many existing engineers say that they obtained a traditional engineering degree and had to learn the basics of a different discipline on their own in order to do their job as it evolved to include more automation,” Boles continued.

“For mechatronics graduates, they will of course need continuous lifelong learning as technology changes, but they will at least have the basics of the discipline(s) needed for automation covered.”

Rascoe, dean of Career and Technical Programs at Motlow, said the Middle Tennessee region is seeing a growth in advanced manufacturing industries from automotive to appliances to food manufacturing and more.

“These companies employ the most advanced manufacturing technologies available, and it is crucial to be able to supply the industries with a well-educated and trained workforce to meet the stringent demands today,” Rascoe said. “Training in the mechatronic technologies is vital today. From the maintenance personnel to the engineers, all need to understand these technologies and how to maintain, build and design them.”

Rascoe said that from his perspective, the Motlow and MTSU programs “are addressing the needs of today and tomorrow to prepare students for a rewarding career.”

“It is a great program that serves industry and the student,” he added. “It fits Middle Tennessee and the growth of the area.”

MTSU mechatronics engineering students will be utilizing state-of-the-art Siemens equipment. The students in the background include Dustin Taylor, left, Bryan Armstrong and Paul Major. (MTSU photo)

In this 2015 file photo, MTSU mechatronics engineering students will be utilizing state-of-the-art Siemens equipment. The students in the background include Dustin Taylor, left, Bryan Armstrong and Paul Major. (MTSU photo)

Boles said both schools “are fulfilling a critical need … for students, companies and economic development efforts for the region” through both Motlow’s Associate of Applied Science degree and MTSU’s bachelor’s degree levels.

“Many companies make facility location and relocation decisions based on the availability of a technically educated workforce,” he added. “Middle Tennessee can take advantage of the current lead we have and expand capacity further.”

Bridgestone Americas, Nissan North America and General Motors are among area companies waiting to employ mechatronics graduates.

Mechatronics logoAt the Technical Education Cluster Collaborative, Boles and other experts addressed 50 high school teachers who teach in clusters of STEM — science, technology, engineering and math — classes,  information technology, advanced manufacturing, architecture and construction, transportation, distribution and logistics at the Technical Education Cluster Collaboration.

In addition to sharing information about their programs, experts fielded questions about 21st-century skills and other areas.

Organizers said they wanted the teachers to gain a clear understanding of the vision of career technical education instruction, find ways to develop strategies and learn the expectations of future employees, and determine how that can be shared in the classroom.

Motlow has produced mechatronics graduates from its two-year program since 2010. A $3.2 million federal/state grant is allowing Motlow to expand mechatronics at satellite campuses.

MTSU’s first 13 mechatronics grads earned their degrees in December 2015. Professor Ahad Nasab coordinates the MTSU program, which has grown to more than 250 students.

To learn more about the MTSU mechatronics engineering program, visit www.mtsu.edu/programs/mechatronics or call Nasab at 615-898-2052.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Mansfield joins MTSU to enhance university-industry connection

MTSU alumna Paula Mansfield remembers the first time she stepped foot on the Blue Raider campus as an undergraduate and marvels at the transformation she’s witnessed in the years since.

And with more than three decades of “relationship building” in the financial services industry, Mansfield wants to help continue the transformation at her alma mater through her new role as the director of strategic partnerships in the Office of University Advancement.

MTSU alumna Paula Mansfield ('82) is the new director of strategic partnerships in the Office of University Advancement. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

MTSU alumna Paula Mansfield (’82) is the new director of strategic partnerships in the Office of University Advancement. (MTSU photo by Jimmy Hart)

On the job now for three months, Mansfield said she was attracted to the position “by the potential to create a roadmap where industry and the university could intersect for mutual gain” by tapping into the unique resources that both offer.

“I have come to appreciate the value of the university and see the potential,” she said.

“I see how partnerships can be critical to success, and now I have the benefit of being a single point of contact and a resource for these industries to engage with the university.”

During her years as an executive with First Tennessee Bank, Mansfield worked with a variety of industries within her client base, ranging from medical to legal to entrepreneurial to manufacturing.

Such experience makes Mansfield “the ideal person” to provide the strong customer service and management skills that business and industry leaders expect, said Joe Bales, vice president for university advancement.

Joe Bales

Joe Bales

“The creation of a new position dedicated to addressing the needs of the business community allows us to more fully execute our mission and will expand the services we have available to the corporate community,” Bales said.

“While we’ve long been the primary provider of B.S.-degreed graduates for the Midstate’s workforce, creating this new emphasis on strategic partnerships and business relationships will better showcase our ability to support applied research and employee education and development.”

Mansfield said she’s been listening to university deans and top administrators as well as industry and corporate leaders about potential collaborations, while also learning where the resources within the university are located. The goal is to forge partnerships that are mutually beneficial, leading to sustained funding in the form of donations, sponsorships, research grants and student employment.MTSU Wordmark

Her new role will allow Mansfield to assist companies in areas such as student recruitment, joint research projects, student-designed projects such as capstone work, technology commercialization, faculty consulting, professional workforce development, using lab space and campus facilities and intellectual exchange for problem solving.

“I feel like I’m probably going to be one of the biggest advocates for the students on campus. They are our talent and that’s what employers want access to, our top talent,” she said. “I will be their advocate into the corporate community.”

Mansfield’s ties to and knowledge about MTSU run deep, having served as past president of the National Alumni Association. She’s also previously chaired committees for special projects and search committees and served on various other university committees such as the Quest for Student Success and the MTSU Foundation.

“What we have to do is to showcase the value of the university,” she said. “People and companies are willing to pay for value.”

Mansfield can be reached at paula.mansfield@mtsu.edu.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU on WGNS: Pigskin Pre-Game, language, yoga and new bacteria

MTSU faculty and staff took to the radio recently to share information about an MT Athletics upcoming promotional tour,.

The details were shared during the Aug. 15 “Action Line” program with host Bart Walker. The live program was broadcast on FM 100.5, 101.9 and AM 1450 from the WGNS studio in downtown Murfreesboro. If you missed it, you can listen to a podcast of the show here.

Guests included:

MTSU faculty and staff are shown Aug. 15 at WGNS Radio in downtown Murfreesboro. Guests for the "Action Line' program included: At top from left, Brian Roberts, assistant director of the Center for Accelerated Language Acquisition; Dr. Mary Farone, biology professor and researcher; yoga instructor Rishi; and Dr. Shelley Thomas, director of CALA. (MTSU photo illustration)

MTSU faculty and staff are shown Aug. 15 at WGNS Radio in downtown Murfreesboro. Guests for the “Action Line’ program included: At top from left, Brian Roberts, assistant director of the Center for Accelerated Language Acquisition; Dr. Mary Farone, biology professor and researcher; yoga instructor Rishi; and Dr. Shelley Thomas, director of CALA. (MTSU photo illustration)

• Paul Wydra, MTSU Alumni Relations assistant director, talked about the annual Pigskin Pre-Game fundraiser set for Saturday, Aug. 27. The event will once again kick off the MTSU Blue Raiders football season for alumni and friends of the university.

A fundraiser for the Alumni Legacy Scholarship, the event will begin at 6 p.m. Saturday at The Grove at Williamson Place, 3250 Wilkinson Pike, just off Medical Center Parkway across from Embassy Suites Hilton near Interstate 24.

Read more here.

• Dr. Shelley Thomas, professor of foreign language and director of the Center for Accelerated Language Acquisition (CALA) at MTSU, was joined by Brian Roberts, assistant director of CALA, and CALA Yoga teacher Rishi to discuss ongoing accelerated Spanish language classes and classical Indian yoga classes offered this fall.

CALA, the language training center of the MTSU Honors College, is hosting accelerated five-day accelerated Spanish classes this fall. These classes are open to any one in the community (ages 13 and up). Costs are discounted for MTSU faculty, staff, and students as well as for high school students and K-12 teachers/administrators.

CALA also is offer classical Indian yoga at MTSU this fall. These classes feature practices designed to activate your body, mind, and energy in a way that promotes holistic health and well-being. Learn more about the Spanish and yoga, including dates, location and costs.

• Dr. Mary Farone, MTSU biology professor and researcher, discussed how MTSU and Tennessee Technological University student and faculty researchers discovered two new species of bacteria found in a cooling tower and hot tub in Putnam County, Tennessee.

The discovery may provide clues to new pathways of disease and treatment, said the lead scientists, whose nearly 20-year research endeavor was published in the January 2016 edition of “Genome Announcements” and the February “International Journal of Systematic Microbiology.” Read more and see a video here.

Students, faculty and staff who are interested in guesting on WGNS to promote their MTSU-related activities should contact Jimmy Hart, director of news and media relations, at 615-898-5131 or via email at jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu.

‘MTSU On the Record’ guest denounces tobacco suit ‘malpractice’

An historian who takes members of his own discipline to task for “historical malpractice” was the guest on a recent “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Louis Kyriakoudes

Louis Kyriakoudes

Host Gina Logue’s interview with historian Louis Kyriakoudes first aired Aug. 22 on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ). You can listen to their conversation below.

Kyriakoudes, the director of the Albert Gore Research Center, also is an expert in the history of the cigarette industry worldwide. He is one of only a handful of historians who have been called to testify on behalf of plaintiffs who sued the tobacco industry over the impact the product has on their health.

Using the industry’s own documents, Kyriakoudes has shown that tobacco manufacturers knew their product was addictive and hazardous to human health decades before the 1964 U.S. Surgeon General’s report that drew a direct connection between smoking and cancer.

Condemning what he calls “historical malpractice,” Kyriakoudes asserted that law firms representing the industry have practically told historians testifying for the industry what sort of evidence to provide for the trials.

“The tobacco industry’s efforts to buy expertise and to create a body of knowledge is a form of scientific denialism not unlike the climate change science denialism,” said Kyriakoudes, “but, because it deals with these legal issues of informed assumption of the risk, of knowledge, what people knew and when they knew it, it has a significant public policy and legal impact.”

This fall, Kyriakoudes will teach a class examining the history of the cigarette industry from pre-colonial times to the present day.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

https://youtu.be/hladYW1dmlM

MTSU Foundation honors Hein with 2016 Career Achievement Award

Dr. Michael Hein, a professor of psychology at MTSU since 1990 and the director of MTSU’s Center for Organizational and Human Resource Effectiveness, is this year’s recipient of the MTSU Foundation’s Career Achievement Award.

MTSU industrial/organizational psychology professor Michael Hein expresses his gratitude after receiving the 2016 Career Achievement Award Thursday, Aug. 18, during the university’s Fall Faculty Meeting. Hein, who also is the director of MTSU's Center for Organizational and Human Resource Effectiveness, has taught at MTSU since 1990 and received the university’s highest faculty honor from the MTSU Foundation “for the major contributions to his profession, graduate and undergraduate program development, and the stellar educational preparation of his students.” (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU industrial/organizational psychology professor Michael Hein expresses his gratitude after receiving the 2016 Career Achievement Award Thursday, Aug. 18, during the university’s Fall Faculty Meeting. Hein, who also is the director of MTSU’s Center for Organizational and Human Resource Effectiveness, has taught at MTSU since 1990 and received the university’s highest faculty honor from the MTSU Foundation “for the major contributions to his profession, graduate and undergraduate program development, and the stellar educational preparation of his students.” (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

Considered the pinnacle of recognition for stellar MTSU professors, the Career Achievement Award was presented Thursday, Aug. 18, as part of a welcomed tradition at the MTSU Fall Faculty Meeting inside Tucker Theatre to kick off the 2016-17 academic year.

The annual presentation of the Foundation Awards recognizes, celebrates and rewards university faculty members for their accomplishments inside and outside the classroom. The presentation followed MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee’s 16th State of the University address.

A humbled Hein, surprised to see his photo and bio in the Fall Faculty Meeting program as the award winner, thanked the many “outstanding” faculty members who’ve helped him throughout 25-plus years on the Blue Raider campus.

“All of that stuff that’s in the (program) about me was not done by me alone,” he said. “It was done by me as part of a fantastic team of faculty that it’s been a great pleasure to work with for the last 26 years.”

Hein joined the MTSU family aiming to improve the university’s master’s degree program in industrial/organizational psychology.

He’s raised it from its local roots to a model national program with a focus on strong recruitment, a cohort class structure and improving student internships. He also developed one of the few stand-alone undergraduate industrial/organizational psychology majors in the country, creating a stronger foundation for the I/O grad program.

In addition to his university and community service, Hein also works as a consultant for industries on job preparation, employee training, leadership development and other factors critical to success.

Hein thanked President Sidney A. McPhee and John Cothern, MTSU’s recently retired vice president of business and finance, for quickly approving the startup funds to pursue his efforts to improve the I/O program.

“It stunned me that an academician could make a decision that quickly,” Hein said, drawing laughter from the crowd.

MTSU alumnus Tom Provow (B.S. ’78), current president of the MTSU Foundation, also honored 19 more MTSU professors Thursday for their achievements.

MTSU faculty members gather for a group photo with university leaders Thursday, Aug. 18, after they were recognized by the MTSU Foundation for their service at the Fall Faculty Meeting inside Tucker Theatre. Eleven of the 20 recipients and their 2016 honors include, front row from left, chemistry professor Anatoliy Volkov, Outstanding Achievement in Instructional Technology Award; mathematical sciences professor Abdul Khaliq, Distinguished Research Award; industrial/organizational psychology professor Michael Hein, Career Achievement Award; recording industry professor Charlie Dahan, Outstanding Achievement in Instructional Technology Award; elementary and special education professor Terri Tharp, Outstanding Public Service Award; and political science professor Lisa Langenbach, Outstanding Teacher Award. Standing in the back row are, from left, health and human performance professor Joey Gray, Outstanding Teacher Award; aerospace professor Mark Callendar, Outstanding Teacher Award; MTSU Foundation President Tom Provow; MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee; interim Provost Mark Byrnes; English professor Gaylord Brewer, Creative Activity Award; English professor Jennifer W. Kates, Outstanding Teaching in General Education Award; and electronic media professor Robert Gordon, Special Project Award. You can learn about all the 2016 honorees by clicking on the photo and reading the event program. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli) http://ow.ly/j8kJ303kYzU

MTSU faculty members gather for a group photo with university leaders Thursday, Aug. 18, after they were recognized by the MTSU Foundation for their service at the Fall Faculty Meeting inside Tucker Theatre. Eleven of the 20 recipients and their 2016 honors include, front row from left, chemistry professor Anatoliy Volkov, Outstanding Achievement in Instructional Technology Award; mathematical sciences professor Abdul Khaliq, Distinguished Research Award; industrial/organizational psychology professor Michael Hein, Career Achievement Award; recording industry professor Charlie Dahan, Outstanding Achievement in Instructional Technology Award; elementary and special education professor Terri Tharp, Outstanding Public Service Award; and political science professor Lisa Langenbach, Outstanding Teacher Award. Standing in the back row are, from left, health and human performance professor Joey Gray, Outstanding Teacher Award; aerospace professor Mark Callendar, Outstanding Teacher Award; MTSU Foundation President Tom Provow; MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee; interim Provost Mark Byrnes; English professor Gaylord Brewer, Creative Activity Award; English professor Jennifer W. Kates, Outstanding Teaching in General Education Award; and electronic media professor Robert Gordon, Special Project Award. The nine recipients who couldn’t attend the Aug. 18 event are pictured individually below. You can learn about all the 2016 honorees by clicking on the photo and reading the event program. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

The five recipients of the foundation’s 2016 Outstanding Teacher Award are:

  • Dr. Mark N. Callendar, Department of Aerospace.
  • Dr. H. Joey Gray, Department of Health and Human Performance.
  • Dr. Lisa G. Langenbach, Department of Political Science and International Relations.
  • Dr. Cliff Welborn, Department of Management.
  • Dr. Andrew R. Wyatt, Department of Sociology and Anthropology.

The 14 additional foundation award recipients for 2016 are:

  • Dr. Jennifer W. Kates, Department of English – Outstanding Teaching in General Education Award.
  • Dr. Charles B. Dahan and Tammy R. Donham, Department of Recording Industry, and Dr. Anatoliy Volkov, Department of Chemistry – Outstanding Achievement in Instructional Technology Awards.
  • Dr. Robert B. Blair, Department of Marketing; Dr. Terri J. Tharp, Department of Elementary and Special Education; and Tammy Q. Bryant, University College Off-Campus Programs – Outstanding Public Service Awards.
  • Drs. Norma K. Dunlap, Department of Chemistry; Amy S. Kaufman, Department of English; and Abdul Q. M. Khaliq, Department of Mathematical Sciences – Distinguished Research Awards.
  • Dr. Gaylord Brewer, Department of English – Creative Activity Award.
  • Dr. David E. Nelson, Department of Biology, and Dr. Robert Gordon, Department of Electronic Media Communication, and John Merchant, Department of Recording Industry – Special Projects Awards.

You can view the complete 2016 MTSU Foundation Awards program, which includes more details about the award winners and their work, via PDF at http://ow.ly/j8kJ303kYzU.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

Dr. Cliff Welborn

Dr. Cliff Welborn

Dr Andrew Wyatt web

Dr. Andrew Wyatt

Tammy R. Donham

Tammy R. Donham

Dr. Robert B. Blair

Dr. Robert B. Blair

Tammy Q. Bryant

Tammy Q. Bryant

Dr. Norma K. Dunlap

Dr. Norma K. Dunlap

Dr. Amy S. Kaufman

Dr. Amy S. Kaufman

Dr. David Nelson

Dr. David Nelson

John Merchant

John Merchant