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MTSU celebrates national grant to ADVANCE women in STEM

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, center, reflects on the benefits of the just-announced $195,000 National Science Foundation grant to further the advancement of women in the STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields at MTSU Oct. 30 in the Liz and Creighton Rhea Atrium in the new Science Building. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, center, reflects on the benefits of the just-announced $195,000 National Science Foundation grant to further the advancement of women in the STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields at MTSU Oct. 30 in the Liz and Creighton Rhea Atrium in the new Science Building. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

There was cause — and nearly $200,000 reasons — for celebration on the MTSU campus Thursday (Oct. 30).

The university announced a two-year, $195,000 National Science Foundation ADVANCE grant to further the advancement of women in STEM — or science, technology, engineering and mathematics — and potentially all female students and staff at MTSU.

The study, titled “A Catalyst to ADVANCE the Participation and Advancement of Women in Academics, STEM Careers at Middle Tennessee State University,” will focus on identifying barriers that affect recruitment, retention, participation and promotion of women STEM faculty at MTSU.

STEM faculty members come from both the Colleges of Basic and Applied Sciences and Liberal Arts.

“I’m certain this will be successful,” said MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, who attended the event held in the Liz and Creighton Rhea Atrium in the new Science Building. “The teamwork across interdisciplinary areas of campus reflects our commitment in working together.”

Chemistry professor Judith Iriarte-Gross, one of the co-leaders of the effort, said this project has been years in coming to fruition.

“This tells us that MTSU is serious about women in STEM and we’re looking forward to seeing what the results will tell us,” said Iriarte-Gross, who is director of both the Women in STEM Center and the Expanding Your Horizons in Math and Science program for middle and high school girls.

Dr. Jackie Eller, front left, provides a welcome and introduction of people involved with the $195,000 National Science Foundation ADVANCE grant to help advance the careers of women in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) careers at MTSU Oct. 30 in the Liz and Creighton Rhea Atrium in the new Science Building.

Dr. Jackie Eller, front left, provides a welcome and introduction of people involved with the $195,000 National Science Foundation ADVANCE grant to help advance the careers of women in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) careers at MTSU Oct. 30 in the Liz and Creighton Rhea Atrium in the new Science Building.

Liberal Arts Dean Mark Byrnes said his affected departments include sociology and anthropology and political science.

“What this means is an opportunity to look real carefully at what we can do to improve conditions for women across campus, but especially in the STEM disciplines,” he said.

Jackie Eller, interim dean for the College of Graduate Studies and vice provost for research, said the effort to obtain the grant had been a labor of love.

“This is a grant for us, to help us change,” said Eller, a longtime sociology professor. She added that “being able to inventory will allow us to get to know where our needs are.”

College of Basic and Applied Sciences Dean Bud Fischer few women in the college “have administrative roles. The ADVANCE grant opportunity allows us to figure out who we are as an institution and our role in higher education.”

The program is promoting the Twitter hashtag #mtsuadvance.

For more details regarding the ADVANCE project summary, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/wistem/ADVANCE/.

For more information, call Iriarte-Gross at 615-904-8253.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Keep up with MTSU faculty, staff news, accomplishments

Learn about recent accomplishments by MTSU faculty, staff and administrators and stay informed about their activities with these regular updates. To submit an item for the update, email gina.fann@mtsu.edu.

October 2014 Update

Accomplishments

Dr. David Lavery

Dr. Katie Foss

Dr. Katie Foss (mass comm graduate faculty) has published a chapter, “From Welby to McDreamy: What TV teaches us about doctors, patients, and the health care system,” in the new book “How Television Shapes Our Worldview: Media Representations of Social Trends and Change.”

The book, edited by Drs. Deborah A. Macey and Kathleen M. Ryan of Saint Louis University and Noah J. Springer, a doctoral candidate at the University of Colorado-Boulder, is published by Lexington Books. Foss also wrote an invited entry on breastfeeding in the “Encyclopedia of Health Communication,” edited by Dr. Teresa L. Thompson of the University of Dayton and published this year by Sage Publications.

Dr. David Lavery (English, graduate studies) presented an invited lecture, “Neverending Story: Time Lords and Narrative Time in Doctor Who,” Sept. 25 at Belmont University’s Humanities Forum.

Dr. Roy Moore

Regina Puckett

Dr. Roy Moore (School of Journalism) has been saluted with a rare honorary membership in the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses for his work as co-editor on the fourth edition of “Fundamentals of Occupational and Environmental Nursing: AAOHN Core Curriculum” (Occupational and Environmental Medicine Press, 2013).

Moore and his wife, Dr. Pamela V. Moore, a director of the nursing association’s Southeast Region, worked nearly two years on an extensive redesign and content revision of the textbook, which serves as a resource for a variety of readers, including beginning occupational health nurses, experienced OHNs seeking a “consult” on a particular topic, occupational health nurses studying for certification exams, nursing faculty searching for authoritative source information and more. Dr. Pam Moore also was honored at the AAOHN national conference in Dallas with a lifetime membership.

Regina Puckett (advancement services) has published her latest novel, “Concealed in My Heart,” planned as the kickoff for a five-book series. She writes in multiple genres, including romance, horror, inspiration and children’s picture books, and has been nominated for multiple awards for her prose as well as her poetry collections.

Appearances

Dr. Jim Williams

Kent Syler

Dr. Jim Williams (Albert Gore Research Center) and Kent Syler (political science) appeared on WTVF-TV and NewsChannel 5+ on the Inside Politics program Oct. 24-26 to discuss the Gore Research Center’s Political Jingle Project.

You can learn more about the project here.

 

 

 

 

 

In Memoriam

Dr. William F. Greene

Thomas “Buddy” Taylor

Dr. William Fisher Greene (accounting) died Oct. 24, 2014.  Dr. Greene was employed with MTSU from September 1968 until his retirement in July 1994, serving multiple roles at the university, including assistant professor, administrative assistant to the president, budget director, vice president of business and finance and as an associate professor in accounting.

Thomas “Buddy” Taylor (information technology) died Oct. 21, 2014.  Mr. Taylor was employed with MTSU as a manager for the Information Technology Division from September 1971 until his retirement in February 1996.

Dean hails Science Building’s opportunities on ‘MTSU On the Record’

The environment in which tomorrow’s scientists will lay the groundwork for their futures is the topic of the next “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. Robert "Bud" Fischer, second from right, dean of MTSU's College of Basic and Applied Sciences, shows a group of visitors one of the labs in the university's new Science Building during the Oct. 15 opening ceremony for the facility. Students and faculty can write on the labs' glass walls to work out chemical equations and make notes for research and lab projects. (MTSU file photo by Darby Campbell)

Dr. Robert “Bud” Fischer, second from right, dean of MTSU’s College of Basic and Applied Sciences, shows a group of visitors one of the labs in the university’s new Science Building during the Oct. 15 opening ceremony for the facility. Students and faculty can write on the labs’ glass walls to work out chemical equations and make notes for research and lab projects. (MTSU file photo by Darby Campbell)

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Robert “Bud” Fischer, dean of the MTSU College of Basic and Applied Sciences, will air at 8 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 2, on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ).

Dr. Robert "Bud" Fischer

Dr. Robert “Bud” Fischer

MTSU administrators and other dignitaries held an official ribbon-cutting ceremony for the university’s new $147 million science building Oct. 15.

The 257,000-square-foot facility includes six teaching lecture halls, 13 research laboratories and 36 teaching laboratories.

“The research labs … are gigantic,” said Fischer. “They’re meant to be interdisciplinary. They hold more than one faculty member. They hold more than one faculty member’s grad students and undergrads. So it’s really building a team type of atmosphere to do research.”

For more information about the science building, visit www.mtsu.edu/sciencebuilding.

To listen to previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, go to the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com/ontherecord/.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

MTSU nears 70 percent of Charitable Giving $130K goal (+VIDEO)

(From left) MTSU Marketing and Communication Vice President Andrew Oppmann, Carolyn Tumbleson, MTSU Office of Community and Engagement and Support Director Gloria Bonner and Meagan Flippin discuss how the university is faring in the current Employee Charitable Giving Campaign Oct. 20 in the Student Union Ballroom. Flippin, an MTSU alumna, serves as president and CEO of the United Way of Rutherford and Cannon Counties while Tumbleson is director of resource development. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

MTSU Marketing and Communication Vice President Andrew Oppmann, left, joins Carolyn Tumbleson, MTSU Office of Community and Engagement and Support Director Gloria Bonner and Meagan Flippin to discuss how the university is faring in the current Employee Charitable Giving Campaign Oct. 20 in the Student Union Ballroom. Flippin, an MTSU alumna, serves as president and CEO of the United Way of Rutherford and Cannon Counties, while Tumbleson is director of resource development. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

MTSU staff and faculty are nearly 70 percent toward their goal in the annual Employee Charitable Giving Campaign.

As of Oct. 22, university personnel reached and passed the $87,000 level — about 67 percent toward the goal to raise $130,000 for charitable organizations in Middle Tennessee and the entire state.

2014 Charitable Giving Poster webWhen MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee addressed those who attended a mid-progress report, he told them it was an objective “of not only reaching but exceeding our goal” and approaching anywhere between $133,000 and $135,000.

The MTSU leader, who admits he is competitive, said he wants MTSU to “be one of the top entities in our community” in donating to the numerous nonprofits that provide a social safety net through a wide array of services.

The campus drive ends Friday, Oct. 31. For more information, visit http://mtsu.edu/givemtsu.

Reigning champion Jones College of Business maintains the lead in the Provost’s Cup, a coveted prize going to the academic college on campus that has the highest percentages of participants. The College of Basic and Applied Sciences earned the first cup in 2012.

“The challenge is out,” said alumnus John Hood, master of ceremonies for the event and director of government and community affairs. “Please go out and encourage your colleagues.”

Attendees included United Way of Rutherford and Cannon Counties President and CEO Meagan Flippin, an MTSU alumna, and colleague Carolyn Tumbleson, director of resource development for the organization.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, left, listens Oct. 20 as Sandy Benson, interim chair of the Department of Accounting, talks about how the Jones College of Business is performing in the Employee Charitable Giving Campaign, which ends Friday, Oct. 31. The college is defending champion and frontrunner for the 2014 Provost’s Cup to have the highest percentage of participants. 

Information campus organizers want faculty and staff to know includes:

  • Donations can be as little as $1 per month or a $5 one-time gift, coming out of the employee’s January paycheck.
  • Donations pledged for calendar year 2014 will not automatically continue into the new year.
  • Each year, you are given an opportunity to change your contributions or to renew an existing one by submitting a new pledge form.
  • If everyone gives $59, which is only $4.92 per month, MTSU can reach the $130,000 goal.
  • Contributions to one of the more than 140 organizations help your co-workers and neighbors in communities surrounding the university and others statewide.
  • There are opportunities to receive prizes including reserved parking spaces for one year, luggage and overnight accommodations at area hotels, but you need to pledge early for the most chances to win.
  • The online form may be used for those not able to give but wishing to log their participation.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Watch a kickoff video below:

http://youtu.be/Ca66AJOF_EY

In the News: McPhee guest column on Student Success Advantage

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee emphasized the university’s recently unveiled financial incentives to help future students stay enrolled in a guest commentary published Wednesday, Oct. 8, in The Tennessean and on www.tennessean.com.

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

The MTSU Student Success Advantage was announced last month during the first leg of the university’s annual six-city True Blue Tour to recruit students across the state.

The plan, which has the theme of “Graduate in Four and Get More,” will supplement by $1,000 the HOPE Lottery Scholarships of incoming students who stay on track to graduate in four years.

You can read the column online here for a limited time or click here for a readable pdf version.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

‘MTSU On the Record’ takes rides on student-made experimental vehicles

Solar boats and moon buggies are among the topics on the next edition of the “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. Saeed Foroudastan

Dr. Saeed Foroudastan

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Saeed Foroudastan, associate dean of the College of Basic and Applied Sciences, will air from 8 to 8:30 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 12, on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ).

Foroudastan, who also is a professor in the Department of Engineering Technology, is in charge of the Experimental Vehicles Program.

Its students are encouraged to build vehicles such as a solar-powered boat, an open-wheeled racer in the style of a Formula One car and a buggy that can withstand the simulated terrain of the moon’s surface. These vehicles consistently win design and performance awards at competitions all across the country.

“When they beat a top-notch team from a big engineering school, they feel good about the program at MTSU, what they have done and, overall, it is like a couple of years of work experience,” Foroudastan said.

To listen to previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, go to the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com/ontherecord/.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

A video clip of the interview may be seen below.

http://youtu.be/851X49zDt2A

 

Dr. Saeed Foroudastan, center, who serves as director of the Experimental Vehicles Program, watches MTSU senior Zack Hill, left, and sophomore Jasmine Johnson perform a timed practice to quickly unfold and get seated in the MTSU moon buggy before the April 12, 2014, NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge. (MTSU file photo by News and Media Relations)

Dr. Saeed Foroudastan, center, and MTSU freshman Alec Urban, far right, watch MTSU senior Zack Hill, left, and sophomore Jasmine Johnson perform a timed practice to quickly unfold and get seated in the MTSU moon buggy before leaving for the April 12, 2014, NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge. The MTSU moon buggy team won the 2014 Neil Armstrong Best Design Award at the Huntsville, Alabama, event. (MTSU file photo by News and Media Relations)

In the News: MTSU faculty weigh in on crime, politics, farming

MTSU faculty continue to share knowledge and experience with national and international audiences, most recently on topics of crime, politics and farming.

Dr. Justin Gardner

Dr. Mary A. Evins

Chief Buddy Peaster

Buddy Peaster, director of public safety and chief of the MTSU Police Department, provided warnings about scam artists who target college students for www.moneylife.in. The article may be read here.

Dr. Mary Evins, a professor of history and director of the American Democracy Project at MTSU, weighed in on how to get teenagers interested in the democratic electoral process for www.nyparenting.com and Rochester and Genesee Parent Magazine. Evins’ views are available here.

Dr. Justin Gardner, an associate professor of agribusiness, offered his perspective on the impact of digital technology on agriculture for www.fundweb.co.uk. The story is available here.

Reporters seeking expertise from MTSU personnel, as well as members of the campus community with expertise for media, may contact Gina Logue in the Office of News and Media Relations at 615-898-5081 or via email at gina.logue@mtsu.edu.

Center for Popular Music director visits ‘MTSU On the Record’ (+VIDEO)

Modern preservation of vintage music was the topic of a recent “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. Greg Reish

Dr. Greg Reish

CPM logoHost Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Greg Reish, director of the Center for Popular Music, first aired Sept. 15 on WMOT-FM  (89.5 and www.wmot.org ). You can listen to their conversation here.

Reish, who took over as center director July 1, was most recently associate professor of music history at Roosevelt University in Chicago. He is writing a book about American vernacular guitar styles from the mid-19th century through bluegrass and country music of the 1940s.

In addition, Reish is a professor of musicology in the MTSU School of Music and an accomplished singer and instrumentalist on guitar, banjo, fiddle, mandolin, dulcimer and ukulele.

“I would like to see much more public performance programs, workshops, conferences that aren’t necessarily traditional academic conferences but that are more fan-friendly and student-friendly and that have more music-making involved in them,” Reish said of his future priorities.

To listen to previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, go to the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com/ontherecord/.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

A video segment of the interview may be seen below.

http://youtu.be/I3PifFiu9xA

‘MTSU On the Record’ to air abbreviated ‘State of the University’ address

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee’s annual fall semester address to the faculty was the focus of the Sept. 8 “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee addresses the crowd during his State of the University address Friday morning during the 2014 Fall Faculty Meeting inside Tucker Theatre. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee addresses the crowd during his State of the University address Aug. 22 during the 2014 Fall Faculty Meeting inside Tucker Theatre. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

An abbreviated version of the hourlong speech aired on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ). You can listen to it here.

WMOT aired McPhee’s “State of the University” address live in its entirety on Friday, Aug. 22, from MTSU’s Tucker Theatre.

The speech covers the accomplishments of the 2013-2014 academic year and the challenges that lie ahead as a change in the state’s funding formula for publicly funded institutions of higher learning necessitates an intensified approach to retention and graduation.

“The bottom line is our survival, now and in the future, will not be saying that we’re the largest undergraduate university in the state of Tennessee,” McPhee said.

“It is going to be the number of students that this university produces for the workforce in this region and the state and whether or not those students receive job offers.”

You can watch the complete speech on video hereA transcript is available here.

To listen to previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, go to the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com/ontherecord.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

Professor helps shape Tenn. workplace anti-bullying law, policy

An MTSU business professor continues her push for a more civil workplace.

Dr. Jackie Gilbert, a professor of management in the MTSU Jones College of Business, joined forces with like-minded people across the state and nation to help craft legislation and guidelines that will help do just that within government agencies.

Dr. Jackie Gilbert, center in red, a professor of management in the MTSU Jones College of Business, joined other workplace civility advocates at the June 3 signing of the Healthy Workplace Act. Seated is Gov. Bill Haslam, who signed the bill into law. (Submitted photo)

Dr. Jackie Gilbert, shown at center in red, a professor of management in the MTSU Jones College of Business, joined other workplace civility advocates at the June 3 signing of the Healthy Workplace Act. Seated is Gov. Bill Haslam, who signed the bill into law. (Submitted photo)

Gilbert was part of a group of advocates who helped shape the Healthy Workplace Act, which was signed into law in June by Gov. Bill Haslam. The legislation, sponsored by state Rep. Antonio Parkinson, D-Memphis, grants legal protection to those government agencies that adopt a model policy to combat abusive behavior in the workplace or craft comparable guidelines of their own.

The law applies to any agency, county, metropolitan government, municipality, or other political subdivision of the state.

By enacting the law, Tennessee became the 26th state to introduce the Healthy Workplace Bill and the first to pass it. The national grassroots legislative movement began more than a decade ago to get workplace anti-bullying laws passed in every state.

“Respectful interaction at work is a priority,” said Gilbert, who has incorporated anti-bullying concepts into her teaching. “This law is going to set the stage for providing some guidance for what is acceptable and what is not acceptable at work.”

Dr. Jackie Gilbert

Gilbert is a member of Tennessee Healthy Workplace Advocates, which worked toward passage of the bill. She was recently appointed to serve on a workplace civility workgroup that is advising the Tennessee Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations, or TACIR, on developing a model policy for Tennessee’s state and local governments. The legislation requires that a model be in place by March 15, 2015.

Lynnisse Roehrich-Patrick, TACIR’s executive director, is appreciative of Gilbert’s contribution to this effort.

“Dr. Gilbert brings an academic perspective that is a welcome addition to our work group and complements the expertise of the public administration, legal, and human resource professionals on the team,” Roehrich-Patrick said. “Her knowledge of effective methods to prevent abusive conduct and her commitment to workplace civility are essential to their work.”

Government employers can create their own policy if it helps employers recognize and respond to abusive conduct, and prevents retaliation against any reporting employee. Abusive conduct is defined as repeated verbal abuse, threats, intimidation, humiliation or work sabotage.

To craft the legislation, Parkinson convened a think tank that included Gilbert; Arlene Martin-Norman, co-coordinator, Tennessee Healthy Workplace Advocates; Dr. Gary Namie, director of the Workplace Bullying Institute; Dr. David Yamada, professor of law at Suffolk University and director of the New Workplace Institute; John McManus, legislative liaison and public information officer at the Tennessee Department of Human Resources; Michelle Gaskin, attorney for the Tennessee General Assembly; and Sarah Adair, governmental affairs director at the Tennessee State Employees’ Association.

Earlier this year, Gilbert was named a founding fellow to the U.S. Academy on Workplace Bullying, Mobbing, and Abuse. In June, she conducted a workshop on the Healthy Workplace Act at a Tennessee State Employees’ Association assembly in Murfreesboro.

For more information about the TACIR workgroup, visit http://bit.ly/tacir-civility.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)