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8 MTSU women are among nominees for ATHENA leadership awards

The MTSU community is well-represented among the nominees for the 2017 ATHENA International Leadership Award and the 2017 ATHENA Young Professional Leadership Award.

Click on the logo for ticket information.

Click on the logo for ticket information.

Rutherford Cable, a local organization for women’s professional advancement, will present the awards at a dinner ceremony beginning at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, April 27, at Embassy Suites, 1200 Conference Center Blvd. in Murfreesboro.

University-based nominees for the International Leadership Award include:

  • Lara Daniel, professor of business law and assistant dean for assessment in the Jennings A. Jones College of Business.
  • Dr. Mary Hoffschwelle, history professor and director of MT Engage, a program to promote engaged learning in students’ educational experiences.
  • Dr. Hilary Miller, director of the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center at MTSU.
  • alumna and philanthropist Dr. Liz Rhea, a member of the boards of the MTSU Foundation, MTSU Alumni Board and the Blue Raider Athletic Association.
  • Barbara Scales, director of MTSU’s June Anderson Center for Women and Nontraditional Students.

University-based nominees for the Young Professional Leadership Award include three MTSU alumnae:

  • La’Endia Buchanan, recruiting coordinator and adviser in the Career Development Center at MTSU.
  • Dr. Alicja Lanfear, lecturer in the Department of Biology and a founding officer of the Tennessee Association of Biology Teachers.
  • Asheton Winborn, chapter adviser for the Zeta Theta Chapter of Chi Omega sorority at MTSU.
Dr. Liz Rhea

Dr. Liz Rhea

Dr. Hilary Miller

Dr. Hilary Miller

Dr. Mary S. Hoffschwelle

Dr. Mary Hoffschwelle

Professor Lara Daniel

Professor Lara Daniel

Martha Mertz, founder of the ATHENA International Leadership Award program, will serve as keynote speaker for the awards dinner.

Mertz, an expert on women and leadership, worked with the Lansing, Michigan, Chamber of Commerce in the early 1980s to create the program, which supports, honors and develops women leaders and is offered in more than 500 communities worldwide.

“The ATHENA award recognizes individuals who excel in their professions, give back to their communities and help raise up other leaders, especially women,” said event chair Anne Henslee.

Asheton Winborn

Asheton Winborn

Dr. Alicja K. Lanfear

Dr. Alicja K. Lanfear

La’Endia Buchanan

La’Endia Buchanan

Barbara Scales

Barbara Scales

“The ATHENA Young Professional Leadership Award, introduced to the Rutherford County community in 2016, recognizes an emerging leader under age 40 who exemplifies the ATHENA values and serves as a role model for women personally and professionally.”

Tickets to the award dinner and ceremony are $60 per person and are available online at www.rutherfordcable.org.

Rutherford Cable; Pinnacle Financial Partners; Ascend Federal Credit Union; Deloitte, Farrar/Wright PLLC; Guaranty Trust; State Farm; NHC HealthCare; General Mills; Dempsey Vantrease & Follis PLLC; and VIP Murfreesboro sponsor the awards.

For more information, including a complete list of nominees, contact Tosha Stoutenberg, marketing and communications chair for Rutherford Cable, at tstoutenburg@ascendfcu.org or visit www.rutherfordcable.org.

— Gina K. Logue (Gina.Logue@mtsu.edu)

‘MTSU On the Record’ looks at nontraditional students’ life skills

Getting college credit for what you’ve learned in life was the subject of a recent “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. Dianna Rust

Dr. Dianna Rust

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Dianna Rust, director of prior learning assessment and an associate professor in MTSU’s Department of University Studies, first aired Jan. 31 on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org. You can listen to their conversation below.

WMOT-new web logoRust and Professor Emeritus William Ikard conducted a study of nontraditional students who created a portfolio of their pre-MTSU education in an online course. The pair found that the portfolio process was associated with improved student outcomes.

Ikard is the university’s former director of prior learning assessment.

“During the course, what they would do is work on finding the correct documentation of the learning and then writing and reflecting about their learning,” said Rust, “so there is some new work that has to be produced.”

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

MTSU crews help craft new NPT-NaSHOF series, ‘The Songwriters’

MTSU’s College of Media and Entertainment is pulling all hands into a new project with Nashville Public Television and the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame, bringing faculty, students and the college’s dean together to create a weekly TV show that premiered Jan. 28.

“The Songwriters” will air at 8:30 p.m. Central on WNPT’s second digital channel, WNPT2, and on Comcast Digital Cable channel 241 and Charter Digital Cable channel 176. WNPT2 is available over the air on channel 8.2.

The program will re-air Sundays for Nashville viewers only at 9:30 a.m. CST and again statewide at 4:30 p.m. You can see a preview below.

Hosted by media and entertainment dean Ken Paulson, the first season comprises 18 episodes of conversations with Hall of Fame members discussing their creative processes and what inspired some of their greatest songs, as well as behind-the-scenes stories and rare performances.

Guests for the first season of “The Songwriters” include Hall of Fame members Bill Anderson, Gary Burr, Steve Cropper, Sonny Curtis, Tom Douglas and Ray Stevens. The crew also was able to sit down with songwriting icon Guy Clark before his untimely death last year.

Ken Paulson

Ken Paulson

“We’re honored to partner with the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame, bringing together some of the world’s greatest songwriters with a new generation of media professionals,” Paulson said. “The songwriters’ insights about their art and inspiration make for truly compelling television.”

Students in MTSU’s Department of Electronic Media Communication, who produce live and taped performance broadcasts for national entertainment, athletic and documentary projects, are handling the lion’s share of “The Songwriters” episodes, lighting, filming and editing the shows alongside Department of Recording Industry students providing their audio production expertise.

Dr. Bob Gordon

Dr. Bob Gordon

EMC professor Bob Gordon is directing the MTSU-led episodes of “The Songwriters.” Gordon, who teaches multicamera TV production classes at MTSU, has coordinated the university’s live coverage of the annual Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival since 2014 and has independently produced network entertainment specials such as “The Chieftains: ‘Down The Old Plank Road’ for PBS, “Cinemax Sessions: Chet Atkins and Friends” for Cinemax, “Alabama: Christmas In Dixie” for TNN and several GMA Dove Awards for GMC and the Family Channel.

“The Songwriter series had three video recording sessions,” Gordon explained. “The first was recorded at the historic Columbia Records Studio A, known as the ‘Quonset Hut,’ with a full MTSU student crew. The most recent session was recorded by MTSU students in the College of Media and Entertainment’s Studio 1 (in the Bragg Media and Entertainment Building on campus).

“All of the sessions were edited at MTSU by EMC students. We are discussing a new session of new episodes on campus.”

Up to a dozen students were involved in each of the MTSU sessions, Gordon added.

Isaac Shaw

Isaac Shaw

One of those students, junior EMC major Isaac Shaw of Lebanon, Tennessee, edited the shows with Gordon. In addition to this project and his studies on campus, Shaw runs instant replay for EMC Productions’ MTSU basketball games for ESPN3 and is an editor for the MTV Live series “American Supergroup.”

“Simply put, I was responsible for making sure all of the different video and audio elements came together to form one cohesive story, and I think we have done that,” Shaw said of “The Songwriters.”

CME-logo-web“This project has been a little different than other multicamera-based productions that I’ve been fortunate enough to be a part of. The majority of the shoots, whether … doing ESPN sports or in the studio developing shows, have been strictly live. This project has been a much longer process, where the above-the-line team has been refining the story of these episodes to chronicle the history of these songwriters in a short format — giving them a voice, so to speak.”

Songwriters Hall of Fame logo webPat Alger, chairman of the Nashville Songwriters’ Hall of Fame Foundation, said the shows have captured the personalities and the stories behind the music that’s streamed from car radios and stereo speakers for decades.

“Just as these conversations have inspired professional songwriters like me, they will have a tremendous impact on anyone interested in how great songs were written and the people who wrote them,” Alger said. “The show is as entertaining as it is informative. The intimate performances and the witty dialogue will stick with you for a long time.”

Shaw said he’s excited that viewers will now hear and be inspired by the tales he and his fellow students heard during production.

NPT-logo-web“The public will get to hear the stories of not necessarily the stars that perform the songs they know and love, but the creators of music classics that have been loved for many years,” Shaw said.

“People who aren’t songwriters will still get something out of this series, too. Creative types in general will find a gold mine of nuggets of wisdom interlaced with real life stories. One of the main themes in the show is how these songwriters stayed true to themselves and persevered through life.”

Cropper was the guest songwriter for the Jan. 28 premiere episode. The inaugural season’s guests also include:

For more information about the Nashville Songwriters’ Hall of Fame, visit www.nashvillesongwritersfoundation.com. For more information about MTSU’s College of Media and Entertainment, visit www.mtsu.edu/media. You can learn more about Shaw’s work at his website, www.shaw-studios.com.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU media students and faculty pose with songwriting great Steve Cropper, center, after taping his episode of the new Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame and Nashville Public Television series “The Songwriters.” From left are students Logan Day, Kaelin Michelle Bastin, Stephen Hart, Robert Bagwell and Bria Kilcrease, Cropper, MTSU College of Media and Entertainment Dean Ken Paulson, Department of Electronic Media Communication professor Bob Gordon and students Jared Moore and Ryan Adams. Paulson serves as host for the series, which premieres Jan. 28 on WNPT, and Gordon is director. (Photo submitted)

MTSU media students and faculty pose with songwriting great Steve Cropper, center, after taping his episode of the new Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame and Nashville Public Television series “The Songwriters.” From left are students Logan Day, Kaelin Michelle Bastin, Stephen Hart, Robert Bagwell and Bria Kilcrease, Cropper, MTSU College of Media and Entertainment Dean Ken Paulson, Department of Electronic Media Communication professor Bob Gordon and students Jared Moore and Ryan Adams. Paulson serves as host for the series, which premiered Jan. 28 on WNPT, and Gordon is director. (Photo submitted)

MTSU College of Media and Entertainment Dean Ken Paulson, left, listens as songwriting great Steve Cropper starts to play “Dock of the Bay,” one of his hits, on an upcoming episode of the new Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame and Nashville Public Television series “The Songwriters,” which premieres Jan. 28 on WNPT. (Photo by Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame/MTSU)

MTSU College of Media and Entertainment Dean Ken Paulson, left, listens as songwriting great Steve Cropper starts to play “Dock of the Bay,” one of his hits, on an upcoming episode of the new Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame and Nashville Public Television series “The Songwriters,” which premiered Jan. 28 on WNPT. (Photo by Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame/MTSU)

MTSU professor Bob Gordon, right, of the Department of Electronic Media Communication studies video from the new Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame and Nashville Public Television series “The Songwriters” in the control room as an MTSU EMC student works alongside him. The show premieres Jan. 28 on WNPT. (Photo courtesy of the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame)

MTSU professor Bob Gordon, right, of the Department of Electronic Media Communication studies video from the new Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame and Nashville Public Television series “The Songwriters” in the control room as an MTSU EMC student works alongside him. The show premiered Jan. 28 on WNPT. (Photo courtesy of the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame)

Civil War printing talk launches new day, time for ‘MTSU On the Record’

A recent edition of “MTSU On the Record” considered whether the pen was mightier than the sword in the aftermath of the Civil War.

Dr. Alan Boehm

Dr. Alan Boehm

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Alan Boehm, a professor of collection development and management at the James E. Walker Library, was the first show for the program’s new weekday and time slot, 9:30 to 10 p.m. Tuesdays, when it first aired Jan. 24 on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org. You can listen to their conversation below.

Boehm, who is in charge of the library’s special collections unit, discussed its most recent exhibit, “Printing the Civil War: Representation and Commemoration During and After the Conflict.”

“We have a lot of what are loosely called regimental histories,” said Boehm. “We have books written in the effort to explain the causes of the Civil War. We have a number of books that are biographical in nature recounting both the generals’ and upper echelon officers’ experience … as well as the foot soldiers’ experience.”

Dr. Derek Frisby

Dr. Derek Frisby

To enhance viewers’ appreciation of the display, Dr. Derek Frisby, a military historian and lecturer in MTSU’s Department of Global Studies and Cultural Geography, also led an informal talk on the topic Jan. 26 in the library’s fourth-floor special collections area.

WMOT-new web logo“The American Civil War witnessed numerous innovations and technologies to the battlefield,” said Frisby. “Yet it was perhaps one of the older weapons in the Union arsenal that secured their victory — the printing press.”

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

Items in the “Printing the Civil War” display are shown in the James E. Walker Library’s Special Collections area. The red book is “The Boys of ‘61” by newspaper reporter Charles Carleton Coffin, who penned Union-friendly articles for the Boston Journal. (Photo submitted)

Items in the “Printing the Civil War” display are shown in the James E. Walker Library’s Special Collections area. The red book is “The Boys of ‘61” by newspaper reporter Charles Carleton Coffin, who penned Union-friendly articles for the Boston Journal. (Photo submitted)

‘MTSU On the Record’ takes listeners to ‘Marguerite’s Landing’

An MTSU professor emerita, author of several prize-winning books, discussed her newest publication on a recent edition of the “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. June McCash

Dr. June McCash

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. June Hall McCash first aired Jan. 16 on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org. You can listen to their conversation below.

McCash Marguerite cover webMcCash’s latest historical novel is “Marguerite’s Landing,” which is based on the true story of a woman who fled with her family to Jekyll Island in the late 1700s as revolution created social upheaval in her native France.

The book’s protagonist, Marguerite du Bignon, is depicted as a plucky woman who endures setbacks and hardships while trying to create a home in a strange new land.

“She was the only woman, aside from her servants, on the island,” said McCash. “She had to come into a brand new culture she knew nothing about, learn a new language, and, I think, weave her way through a very difficult period of time historically.”

McCash is the author of 13 books, including four novels, eight nonfiction works and a book of poetry. She was named Georgia Author of the Year in 2011 and 2013 for her novels.

WMOT-new web logoA former professor of French in the MTSU Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, McCash is a recipient of both the MTSU Foundation’s Distinguished Research Award and Career Achievement Award. She also was the founding director of the university’s Honors Program, which evolved into the current University Honors College.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

MTSU’s Brown among ‘2017 Most Influential in Concrete Construction’

A higher education leader who has been turning out future leaders in the concrete industry for more than 15 years, MTSU’s Heather Brown has been named one of four 2017 Most Influential People in Concrete Construction by an industry publication.

Dr. Heather Brown

Dr. Heather Brown

Brown, director of the newly combined School of Concrete and Construction Management, learned recently about the Hanley Wood’s Commercial Construction Group’s “most influential” national recognition, which also included Jereme Montgomery, Steve Lloyd and Jim Cornell.

Brown told Bill Palmer, editorial director of Hanley Wood’s Commercial Construction Group, taht MTSU “is the only school at a major university with the word ‘concrete’ in our name.”

Not long after arriving at MTSU, Brown said she “found out that I love teaching and the interaction with the concrete industry.” She directs five faculty members and a marketing staff member, and the school recently hired a new event coordinator.

Concrete Industry Management is one of the university’s signature programs.

You can read the full story here.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Immigration’s role in American history is focus of ‘MTSU On the Record’

The impact of immigration in shaping the American experience is the topic of the next “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. John Vile

Dr. John Vile

Vile immigration book cover webHost Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. John Vile, dean of the University Honors College and a political scientist, will air from 8 to 8:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 9, and from 6 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 15, on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org.

Vile is the editor of “American Immigration and Citizenship: A Documentary History.” In this book, using a mixture of statutes, constitutional provisions, speeches, judicial decisions and interpretive essays, Vile traces changes in immigration policy over the years.

WMOT-new web logoIn the interview, Vile also comments on contemporary attitudes toward immigration stemming from current political controversies such as “sanctuary cities,” where mayors have refused to prosecute undocumented immigrants solely for violating federal immigration laws.

“For all practical purposes, the national government does set immigration policy,” said Vile, “but once they’re here, that does present a little bit different issue, and I think it will be sort of one of the flashpoints that we’ll just have to watch for and see how it’s resolved.”

The fall 2016 Honors College Lecture Series, which focused on “Citizenship, Refugees and Immigration,” featured Vile as one of the presenting scholars.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

This circa 1905 photo of the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor, created by the Detroit Photographic Co. and the focus of countless immigrants’ hopes since it opened in October 1886, is part of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division and is featured on the cover of MTSU political scientist John Vile’s book “American Immigration and Citizenship: A Documentary History.” (photo courtesy of the Library of Congress)

This circa 1905 photo of the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor, created by the Detroit Photographic Co. and the focus of countless immigrants’ hopes since it opened in October 1886, is part of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division and is featured on the cover of MTSU political scientist John Vile’s book “American Immigration and Citizenship: A Documentary History.” (photo courtesy of the Library of Congress)

Child care expert, Secret Service agent on ‘MTSU On the Record’ programs

The “MTSU On the Record” radio program rang out the old year with a look at child care and rang in the new year with an examination of a major federal agency.

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Nancy James, director of the MTSU Child Care Lab, first aired Dec. 26 on WMOT-FM/Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org. You can listen to their conversation below. WMOT-new web logo

Nancy James

Nancy James

Lynda Williams

Lynda Williams

James, who is beginning her 29th year as director, is in charge of tending to youngsters ages 3 through 5 whose parents are either MTSU students or employees. The Child Care Lab also develops the talents of future professionals by guiding student workers in the skills needed to develop children’s minds and bodies.

“They work there anywhere from five hours to 15 hours a week, and they’re counted in the (pupil-teacher) ratio because they go through the same training as anyone would to be in a classroom with preschoolers,” said James. “We will generally keep anywhere from three to five adults in the room through the bulk of the day.”

Logue’s interview with Lynda Williams, deputy assistant director for the Office of Human Resources of the United States Secret Service, first aired Jan. 2. You also can listen to it below.

Williams, an MTSU alumna who has served all over the world, is the highest-ranking African-American woman in the history of the Secret Service, which is charged both with protecting the president of the United States and protecting the nation’s monetary supply.

“Even when I was in South Africa, most of my investigations were over counterfeit currency,” said Williams. “Peru is one of our highest yielding countries for U.S. counterfeit currency. So it’s still very much a hot market for us, and it keeps us going amidst all the other investigations that we have.”

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, go to www.mtsunews.com and click on “Audio Clips.”

For more information, contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

— Gina Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Retirement ends Ricketts’ alternative fuels era at MTSU

The Cliff Ricketts era of alternative fuels research at MTSU ended recently with one final attempt to successfully drive U.S. 231 in Tennessee between the Kentucky and Alabama state lines using a wood gasification process.

Recently retired after a 40-year career as an MTSU School of Agribusiness and Agriscience professor and agriculture education teacher, Ricketts completed the approximately 131-mile trip Dec. 13 from near Scottsville, Kentucky, to near Hazel Green, Alabama.

Recently retired professor and alternative fuels researcher Cliff Ricketts takes a break from his recent research drive using a combination of a wood gasification unit and gasoline. (Submitted photo)

Recently retired professor and alternative fuels researcher Cliff Ricketts takes a break from his recent research drive using a combination of a wood gasification unit and gasoline. (Submitted photos)

However, he and his team — which included MTSU senior Colton Huckabee of Columbia, Tennessee — needed to use part wood and part gasoline to make it work.

Ricketts, 68, has crisscrossed the U.S. for five decades, researching ways to use fuel other than gas to make vehicles go. His alternative methods have included waste animal (chicken) fat or “southern fried fuel” as it was called; hydrogen from water separated by the sun (solar); corn, methane from cow manure, soybean oil and others.

“This is part of the research process and we ran out of time before we could make it (wood gasification) work,” said Ricketts, who overcame a number of failed attempts in the past. “We did our research on wood gasification. The attempt did not meet our expectations. It didn’t work as well as we had hoped. I know we could have made it work if we had had more time.”

Ricketts said his biggest accomplishment was “coming up with the process to make America energy independent in a time of a national crisis.” He added that his primary duty, teaching agriculture students to educate others, impacted “350 to 400 certified teachers, so my work will end up affecting thousands of lives.”

MTSU will replace Ricketts by fall of 2017, but he does not anticipate any colleague or a new hire to follow his path with alternative fuels.

“It was something I invented — a side passion,” he said. “There is little or none (alternative fuel research) in agriculture. It’s in engineering.”

Ricketts, who will oversee his 200-acre farm in Wilson County, added he anticipates being invited to speak on the subject of alternative fuels if gas prices reach $5.

In addition to Huckabee, Ricketts’ team included MTSU alumnus Terry Young of Woodbury, Tennessee, and Mike Sims of Michigan.

Ricketts earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville and a doctorate from Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio.

He has earned numerous MTSU and other accolades including the Career Achievement Award and a Silver Column Award presented by university President Sidney A. McPhee.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Cliff Ricketts drives through Murfreesboro during his research with wood gasification. He wound up using a combination of wood and gas.

Cliff Ricketts drives through Murfreesboro during his research with wood gasification. He wound up using a combination of wood and gas.

MTSU senior Colton Huckabee, front, observes as Terry Young makes adjustments to the wood gasification unit during the 131-mile research run made by retiring professor Cliff Ricketts.

MTSU senior Colton Huckabee, front, observes as Terry Young makes adjustments to the wood gasification unit during the 131-mile research run made by retiring professor Cliff Ricketts.

Shown with the wood gasification unit used in the research project, Cliff Ricketts, left, stands with crew members Terry Young, MTSU senior Colton Huckabee and Mike Sims. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

Shown with the wood gasification unit used in the research project, Cliff Ricketts, left, stands with crew members Terry Young, MTSU senior Colton Huckabee and Mike Sims. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

 

 

 

 

In the News: MTSU experts weigh in on election, Obama legacy

MTSU faculty experts recently expressed themselves for national media outlets on several hot button topics, including various election-related issues and Russian perspectives on American politics.

• Kent Syler, assistant professor of political science, commented on the lack of yard signs by political candidates for www.expresstelegraph.com Oct. 13. His views may be read here.

Kent Syler

Kent Syler

Dr. Andrei Korobkov

Dr. Andrei Korobkov

Dr. Andrei Korobkov, professor of political science, wrote an article titled “2016 Presidential Race Reveals the Systemic Crisis in American Society” for www.rethinkingrussia.ru. It was posted on Nov. 14 and is available here.

Korobkov also was interviewed about whether Americans are happy with Donald Trump on the program “Morning Ireland” on Ireland’s RTE Radio 1 on Nov. 11. The podcast can be heard here.

Russia Direct published Korobkov’s comments on President Barack Obama’s legacy in an article titled “Obama’s legacy: Not that bad after all?” on Nov. 24. It may be read here. Russia Direct also published Korobkov’s editorial titled “What Obama’s foreign policy legacy means for Trump” Nov. 25. It is available here.

Dr. John Vile

Dr. John Vile

Dr. John Vile, professor of political science and dean of the University Honors College, appeared on “Inside Politics,” a program on WTVF-TV’s sister channel NewsChannel5+ Nov. 14 to discuss the American presidential election. His analysis may be viewed here.

Vile also provided information Nov. 11 on the transition of power between U.S. presidents John Adams and Thomas Jefferson for the British Broadcasting Corp. The article is available here.

Reporters seeking expertise from MTSU personnel, as well as members of the campus community with expertise for media, may contact Gina Logue in the Office of News and Media Relations at 615-898-5081 or via email at gina.logue@mtsu.edu.

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