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Next ‘MTSU On the Record’ keeps pace with the rhythm of language

The relationship between musical rhythm and speech rhythm is the topic on the next “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

MTSU psychology professor Dr. Cyrille Magne adjusts monitoring equipment on then-graduate student and test subject Riley Finch to prepare for an electroencephalography, or EEG, experiment in the university's EEG lab in this 2013 file photo. (MTSU file photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU psychology professor Dr. Cyrille Magne adjusts monitoring equipment on then-graduate student and test subject Riley Finch to prepare for an electroencephalography, or EEG, experiment in the university’s EEG lab in this 2013 file photo. (MTSU file photo by J. Intintoli)

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Cyrille Magne, an associate professor of psychology, will air from 8 to 8:30 a.m. Sunday, May 1, on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ).

Magne and two academic colleagues authored research into the impact of music rhythm abilities on speech rhythm sensitivity. The research, which was funded with a National Science Foundation grant, was published in the academic journal “Brain and Language.”

Their study supports the idea that music training might enhance speech processing skills, which would benefit students in honing their overall literacy skills.

“All languages in the world have their own rhythm,” said Magne. “And, especially in English, what we think about rhythm are those little emphases you put on some syllables that we call stresses. The pattern of stress and stress syllables is really something that is unique to the English language.”

You can find more information about MTSU research into the connection between the brain and language at https://sites.google.com/site/brainlanguagelab.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

New plaque honors longtime Liberal Arts dean McDaniel

MTSU is paying tribute to one of its most influential professors and administrators by unveiling a plaque in his honor.

Dr. John McDaniel

Dr. John McDaniel

Dr. John McDaniel, who served as dean of the College of Liberal Arts for a quarter-century, was the focus of the April 15 ceremony in the James Union Building.

College of Liberal Arts logo webThe Shakespearean scholar came to MTSU in 1970 as an assistant professor of English and went on to become chair of the Department of English before being named dean in 1985. He died in 2010.

“He was renowned for his wisdom, wit and ability to deal with all kinds of people,” said Dr. Mark Byrnes, McDaniel’s successor as liberal arts dean.

McDaniel influenced thousands of students and hundreds of faculty during his MTSU years. Two of his relatives continue his legacy by contributing their expertise to academia at MTSU.

“He was a teacher first,” said Dr. Scott McDaniel, the dean’s son and a math professor in the Department of University Studies. “In fact, when he was dean, he would teach a Shakespeare class pro bono (free).”

Dr. Scott McDaniel

Dr. Scott McDaniel

Dr. Mark Byrnes

Dr. Mark Byrnes

Scott McDaniel remembered his father as the kind of dad who would lead by example rather than trying to direct his son’s appreciation of a school subject.

“He would get you to think about it on your own so that he wouldn’t write the paper for you, but he would … have a conversation and bounce off you something in Shakespeare to something you could relate to in another area,” said Scott. “He wasn’t calculated at all. It was very organic.”

Dr. Robb McDaniel, the dean’s nephew and a professor of political science, said his uncle was a “player’s coach, not a manager’s coach,” a sports metaphor that describes the dean’s ability to deal with faculty and administrators.

“He, as dean, tried to stay out of people’s business,” said Robb McDaniel. “That was one of his guiding principles: You hire good people and let them do their jobs.”

Dr. Robb McDaniel

Dr. Robb McDaniel

Robb McDaniel said the senior McDaniel’s humor could be biting, but not cruel. He recalled a time when a fellow dean who no longer works at MTSU referred to his own college as “diamond mining” and said all the other colleges were “coal mining.” McDaniel addressed the impolitic remark by passing out coal miners’ hats at the next deans’ meeting.

“He learned how to navigate craziness to the point where nothing seemed to surprise him,” said Robb McDaniel, “and so, because of that, he was able to handle a lot of the craziness that deans have to handle with a degree of humorous detachment.”

John McDaniel died May 3, 2010, “too soon and much to his chagrin,” according to his self-penned obituary. The plaque honoring his contributions to MTSU will be placed permanently outside the graduate study room/classroom on the third floor of Peck Hall.

For more information, contact Connie Huddleston, events coordinator for the College of Liberal Arts, at 615-494-7628 or connie.huddleston@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

This MTSU file photo shows the university's Peck Hall, named for the late Drs. Richard C. and Virginia Peck, who MTSU from the late 1940s through the 1970s in the languages and English departments, respectively. A plaque honoring former English profesor and College of Liberal Arts dean John McDaniel, who taught in the building over his 40-year MTSU career, will be affixed outside the third-floor graduate study room April 15.

This MTSU file photo shows the university’s Peck Hall, named for the late Drs. Richard C. and Virginia Peck, who served MTSU from the late 1940s through the 1970s in the languages and English departments, respectively. A plaque honoring former English professor and College of Liberal Arts dean John McDaniel, who taught in the building over his near 40-year MTSU career, will be affixed outside the third-floor graduate study room April 15. (MTUS file photo)

Professor wins national titles at ‘masters’ sprint championships

MTSU guitar professor William Yelverton continues to keep his body fine-tuned to continue his passion for high-level track and field sprinting as he gets older.

Yelverton won the 400-meter national championship in the M55 age group at the USA Track and Field Masters National Indoor Championships in Albuquerque, New Mexico, last month, according to a USA Track and Field Masters news release.

Pictured, from left, are members of the World Record 4x200-meter M55 team at the USA Track and Field National Championships: James Chinn, William Yelverton, Don McGee and Ben James. (Submitted photo)

MTSU guitar professor William Yelverton, shown second from left, poses for a photo with members of the world record 4×200-meter M55 team at the USA Track and Field National Championships. From left are James Chinn, Yelverton, Don McGee and Ben James. (Photos submitted)

Yelverton, who received an “Age Group Athlete of the Year Award” from USA Track and Field in December, is a professor of classical guitar in the MTSU School of Music and a visiting professor of music at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee.

“Happy to be still getting faster as I get older. Life is good,” Yelverton said.

Remarkably, his 55.22 seconds was the fastest indoor 400-meter time in the world in eight years in his age group, according to the USATF Masters release.

Yelverton anchored the 4×200-meter relay team of Jim Chinn, Ben James, and Don McGee to set the M55 world record in the 4x200m relay, eclipsing the record set by Great Britain in 2014.

The MTSU professor also ran an indoor personal record time of 24.65 seconds in the 200-meter event, where he won the bronze medal, missing second place by just 1/100th of a second. His 200-meter time is ranked third fastest in the world this year in M55.

Held March 4-6, this 2016 competition was Yelverton’s third USATF Masters National Championship in the 400 meters. His time of 55.22 seconds is faster than his previous two championship races.

Last August, he won bronze medals in both the 400-meter and 200-meter events at the World Championships in Lyon, France. His indoor times in Albuquerque were faster than his outdoor times in France at the World Championships.

USA Track and Field is the national governing body for track and field, long-distance running and race walking in the United States. Learn more at www.usatf.org.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU professor William Yelverton, out front in yellow jersey, wins a 200-meter semifinal at the USA Track and Field Masters National Indoor Championships, held March 4-6 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. (Submitted photo)

MTSU professor William Yelverton, shown leading the pack WD yellow jersey, wins a 200-meter semifinal at the USA Track and Field Masters National Indoor Championships, held March 4-6 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

MTSU’s Keel helps combat gender inequities in country music

Beverly Keel wants to change the conversation about women in country music, and her recent public sit-down with country music powerhouse Reba McEntire is evidence that she is helping to do just that.

A music business veteran and currently chair of MTSU’s highly respected Department of Recording Industry, Keel co-founded the Change the Conversation advocacy group in 2014 with Leslie Fram, CMT senior vice president, and Tracy Gershon, Rounder Records Group’s vice president of A&R.

The Change the Conversation group recently launched its mentoring sessions for young artists at the Bluebird Café in Nashville, Tennessee. Pictured, from left, are Beverly Keel, chair of MTSU's Department of Recording Industry and co-founder of Change the Conversation; Leslie Fram, CMT senior vice president and Change the Conversation co-founder; country music legend and special guest Reba McEntire; and Tracy Gershon, Rounder Records Group's vice president of A&R and Change the Conversation co-founder. (Photo courtesy of Justin McIntosh)

The Change the Conversation group recently launched its mentoring sessions for young artists at the Bluebird Café in Nashville, Tennessee. Pictured, from left, are Beverly Keel, chair of MTSU’s Department of Recording Industry and co-founder of Change the Conversation; Leslie Fram, CMT senior vice president and Change the Conversation co-founder; country music legend and special guest Reba McEntire; and Tracy Gershon, Rounder Records Group’s vice president of A&R and Change the Conversation co-founder. (Photo courtesy of Justin McIntosh)

The group is made up of largely Nashville-based women from various music backgrounds who are working together to improve the environment for women in country music, including mentoring aspiring female artists.

“Our goals include getting more women played on country radio, getting more women signed to major record label and publishing company deals and getting more women featured in high-profile opportunities, whether it is an appearance on an awards show or TV show,” Keel said.

On Tuesday, the group launched “Change the Conversation Presents: Rising Young Artists Mentoring Sessions,” with Keel doing a Q&A with special guest mentor and music legend Reba McEntire at the famous Bluebird Café in Nashville.

During the session, as reported by musicrow.com and billboard.com, McEntire announced that she was forming her own management company, Reba’s Business Inc., to direct her career and that she would serve as president. Read more at http://bit.ly/1UVnO6g.

Keel, who has been an award-winning music industry journalist, expects Change the Conversation will be a resource that MTSU recording industry students can tap into for guidance, networking and awareness as they complete their degrees and start on their own paths in the music industry.

“We are working to help create a level playing field for females, which would benefit our female students, whether they want to be artists or music executives, after they graduate and launch their careers,” Keel said. “One of the goals of Change the Conversation was to create a mentoring program, so both MTSU students and alumni will benefit from this program.”

Efforts to address gender inequity in the country music industry took off in spring 2015 following the “Tomato-gate” incident. A country music radio executive told a trade publication at the time that he advised radio stations not to play too many songs by female artists, using the analogy of a salad in which the male artists were the lettuce of country music radio and female artists were “the tomatoes of our salad.”

Keel and others publicly criticized the comments and helped bring greater awareness about gender inequities in the industry. Keel recently traveled to Northeastern University in Boston to talk to students about gender equality in music and to present a case study on Change the Conversation.

“My hope is that we are raising awareness so that both male and female students know of the problem that exists regarding inequality in the music industry so they too will remain committed to seeking fairness in their careers,” she said.

For more information about Change the Conversation, contact Keel at Beverly.Keel@mtsu.edu.

For more information about MTSU’s Department of Recording Industry, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/recording-industry/.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

Country music, gender earn professor’s scrutiny on ‘MTSU On the Record’

A recent “MTSU On the Record” radio program explores how gender in country music is about much more than simply “honky-tonk angels.”

Dr. Kris McCusker

Dr. Kris McCusker

McCusker Country Boys cover webHost Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Kris McCusker, a professor of history at MTSU, first aired March 28 on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ). You can listen to their conversation below.

McCusker is co-editor, with Dr. Diane Pecknold of the University of Louisville, of “Country Boys and Redneck Women: New Essays in Gender and Country Music,” a collection of analyses on gender identity within the genre from a variety of academic perspectives.

The topics addressed in the book include gender in songwriting; the credibility of Taylor Swift; the impact of Kitty Wells, Loretta Lynn and Dolly Parton; gender in country music in Brazil and Australia; and the female inmates of the Texas State Prison who performed on the radio from 1938 to 1944.

“Country music may seem never to change, but that’s the point,” said McCusker. “Country music sells itself as being unchanging so it can do a lot of changing when nobody really notices it.”

“Country Boys and Redneck Women” is the follow-up to McCusker’s and Pecknold’s 2004 collaboration, “A Boy Named Sue: Gender and Country Music.” That collection was the first book-length effort to examine how gender conventions, both masculine and feminine, have structured the creation and marketing of country music.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

https://youtu.be/xG9V5NzrfEY

MTSU on WGNS: Literary fest, new Chinese center, study abroad in Cuba

MTSU faculty and staff took to the radio recently to discuss an upcoming literary festival on campus, the opening of a new Chinese music center and a study abroad trip to Cuba.

The details were shared during the March 21 “Action Line” program with host Bart Walker. The live program was broadcast on FM 100.5, 101.9 and AM 1450 from the WGNS studio in downtown Murfreesboro. If you missed it, you can listen to a podcast of the show here.

Guests included:

• Dr. Jennifer Kates, an MTSU English professor and organizer of this year’s Southern Literary Festival hosted at MTSU March 24-26.

MTSU faculty and staff share campus happenings on the March 21 "Action Line" program on WGNS Radio in downtown Murfreesboro. Clockwise, from top left, guests included Dr. Jennifer Kates, English professor; Dr. Jim Chaney with Global Studies and Cultural Geography; and Dr. Guanping Zheng, bottom left, and Mike Novak, director and assistant director respectively with the MTSU Confucius Institute. (Photo illustration by Jimmy Hart)

MTSU faculty and staff share campus happenings on the March 21 “Action Line” program on WGNS Radio in downtown Murfreesboro. Clockwise, from top left, guests included Dr. Jennifer Kates, English professor; Dr. Jim Chaney with Global Studies and Cultural Geography; and Dr. Guanping Zheng, bottom left, and Mike Novak, director and assistant director respectively with the MTSU Confucius Institute. (Photo illustration by Jimmy Hart)

The event will feature writing workshops, readings and master classes for students, as well as special guests Ann Patchett and Minton Sparks in free public appearances.

The Southern Literary Festival is an organization of Southern colleges and schools founded in 1937 at Mississippi’s Blue Mountain College to promote Southern literature.

Each year a different university hosts the festival, which is an undergraduate writing conference for a wide variety of genres, including fiction, poetry, playwriting and nonfiction.

For more information, read the full story here.

• Guanping “Ping” Zheng, director of the MTSU Confucius Institute, and Mike Novak, assistant director, discussed the recent opening of the MTSU Center for Chinese Music and Culture on Bell Street.

The March 17 grand opening unveiled the first and only center of its kind in North America. Located on the first floor of the multipurpose Miller Education Center at 503 Bell St., the 3,200-square-foot center will see a library, an archive, classrooms and a musical instrument gallery.

The gallery includes some rare Chinese instruments, including various mouth organs, the ancestors of the Western harmonica and reed organ. Also included is the first set of bronze chime bells built as a replica of those discovered in the tomb of the Marquis Yi of the Chinese state of Zeng. The originals date back to 433 BCE (Before the Common Era).

The center was made possible with an initial $1 million grant from Hanban Confucius Institute in Beijing. Read the full story here.

• Dr. Jim Chaney, lecturer in the Global Studies and Cultural Geography program and co-director of the MTSU Signature Program in Cuba, discussed the MTSU study abroad trip to Cuba in late 2015.

Until recently, Cuba was practically off limits to most U.S. citizens, but that has changed with the Obama administration’s decision in 2014 to reestablish bilateral relations between the two nations.

Chaney and Dr. Steve Morris, political science professor, took a group of MTSU students to the island in order to experience firsthand a country in transition. This was a co-taught course between Global Studies and the Department of Political Science and International Studies and is representative of the 32 MTSU Signature Education Abroad programs offered at MTSU this year.

Students, faculty and staff who are interested in guesting on WGNS to promote their MTSU-related activities should contact Jimmy Hart, director of news and media relations, at 615-898-5131 or via email at jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu.

In the News: MTSU experts on fraud, politics, healthy lifestyles

MTSU faculty and staff experts contributed their knowledge to various national media outlets recently, sounding off on the problems of workers’ compensation fraud, the tone of political jargon and how health care practitioners can take care of themselves.

William Canak, a professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, explained ways that construction companies violate workers’ compensation laws for Construction Dive. The article is available here.

Tiffany Harrison, adjunct professor, Department of Human Sciences

Tiffany Harrison

Kent Syler

Kent Syler

Dr. William Canak

Dr. William Canak

Kent Syler, an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science and International Relations, provided an analysis of words associated with presidential candidates for Raycom Media. The communications chain provides services for 62 television stations in 42 markets and 20 states. His views may be found here.

Syler also described how political rhetoric has changed since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, for U.S. News and World Report. The story is accessible here.

Tiffany Harrison, an adjunct professor in the Department of Human Sciences and a registered dietician, wrote a blog post with tips for health care professionals on how they could stay healthy and bear up under the stress of their workloads for www.bankershealthcaregroup.com. The post is available here.

Reporters seeking expertise from MTSU personnel, as well as members of the campus community with expertise for media, may contact Gina Logue in the Office of News and Media Relations at 615-898-5081 or via email at gina.logue@mtsu.edu.

$714K USDA grant boosts MTSU agriculture’s research efforts

A $714,000 U.S. Department of Agriculture grant to MTSU for collaborative research with two Texas universities will support a partnership to discover novel ways of land management and solve important ecological problems in changing climates and agricultural management.

MTSU School of Agribusiness and Agriscience assistant professor Song Cui, right, shows how unmanned aircraft systems vehicles (also called drones) will be utilized in research at the MTSU Experiential Learning and Research Center (MTSU Farm in Lascassas, Tennessee). Listening are senior Trevor Hasty, left, junior Daniel Troup and senior William West. (MTSU file photo by Andy Heidt)

MTSU School of Agribusiness and Agriscience assistant professor Song Cui, right, shows how unmanned aircraft systems vehicles, or drones, will be used in research at the MTSU Experiential Learning and Research Center in Lascassas, Tennessee. Listening are senior Trevor Hasty, left, junior Daniel Troup and senior William West. (MTSU file photo by Andy Heidt)

The three-year joint venture between MTSU, Texas A&M and Sam Houston State University is the largest USDA grant the MTSU School of Agribusiness and Agriscience has ever received and the largest of 12 national competitive awards totaling $4 million granted by the USDA in February.

The award is for precision agriculture, agroecological education and research.

Song Cui

Dr. Song Cui

MTSU will oversee the overall research and educational components of the project and coordinate with the other partner institutions, said Dr. Song Cui, an assistant professor in the School of Agribusiness and Agriscience and the project’s leader.

“We will be setting up a very strong agroecological research site here in Middle Tennessee,” he added. “Texas A&M will provide strong research and contribution on the ecological modeling component of the project. Sam Houston will focus on agroecological education and leadership building for agricultural students.”

Calling it a milestone for the School of Agribusiness and Agriscience, interim director Jessica Gentry Carter said the $714,023 award “provides a great opportunity for us to build on this partnership and improve research opportunities for our students.”

Including 100 MTSU students, about 260 from the three universities will be involved. Twenty will be in research-based summer internships; the other 240 will enroll in and complete agriculture courses that have been revamped because of this project.

USDA logo72Twelve courses will be modified at MTSU, Texas A&M and Sam Houston. Four are graduate courses, two at MTSU that will be taught by associate professor Qiang Wu and one at each of the other schools.

Nine undergraduate courses — three taught by Cui at MTSU and four at Sam Houston and one at Texas A&M — await students.

The award became a reality because of MTSU’s Non-Land Grant College of Agriculture designation and “the combined strength in agriculture, aerospace, math and our strong partners,” Cui said. He added that the grant competition will strengthen agricultural research and education programs.

Precision agriculture is the science of using computer information systems, sensors, geographic information system, or GIS, and global positioning system, or GPS, technologies “to enable producers to apply the right inputs at the right location at the right time and in the right quantity and right matter,” Cui said.

Dr. Jackie Eller

Dr. Jackie Eller

Dr. Jackie Eller, interim vice provost for research and dean of the College of Graduate Studies, said MTSU now has received more than $1 million from the USDA.

“This success is a result of MTSU’s collaborative spirit and its strength in agriculture, aerospace and mathematics,” Eller said.

Cui and MTSU earned a $300,000 USDA grant in 2015 to support precision agriculture research and education in partnership with the University of Tennessee-Martin.

Dr. Warren Gill, the former director of the school, credits Cui in leading the proposal team.

Dr. Warren Gill

Dr. Warren Gill

“This successful effort is a compliment to the growing reputation MTSU has as institution where scientific innovation is nurtured and rewarded,” Gill said.

“MTSU is beginning to attract scientists of Song Cui’s caliber and continues to enhance the educational experience of MTSU students, particularly those ‘best and brightest’ who become interested and involved in the cutting-edge work this grant award supports.”

Advances in unmanned aircraft systems vehicles, commonly called drones, along with machine learning and modeling in computer science will be incorporated into students’ undergraduate and graduate courses.

MTSU has been working to secure a certificate of authorization from the Federal Aviation Administration to operate unmanned aircraft at the MTSU Experimental Learning and Research Center, also known as the MTSU farm and dairy, located in Lascassas, Tennessee, about 6 miles from the university’s main campus.

This is the first comprehensive research project that has been conducted combining these techniques on a regional scale, said Todd Gary, special assistant to the MTSU vice provost for research.

In addition to Cui, Gary and mathematical sciences’ Wu, the research team includes aerospace’s Doug Campbell, Nithya Rajan of Texas A&M and Shyam Nair of Sam Houston State University.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

‘MTSU On the Record’ studies Latinos’ influence on New Orleans culture

While New Orleans is best known for its French culture, a recent “MTSU On the Record” radio program examines the Hispanic influence on one of America’s most beloved cities.

Dr. James Chaney

Dr. James Chaney

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. James Chaney, a lecturer in MTSU’s global studies and cultural geography program, first aired March 7 on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ).  You can listen to their conversation below.

The Cabildo, located on Jackson Square in New Orleans, originally housed the administrative and legislative council that ruled Spanish Louisiana. The building, rebuilt between 1795 and 1799 after the original was destroyed in the city's great fire of 1788, took its name from the Spanish governing body that met there, the “Illustrious Cabildo” or city council. It's served the city as a museum since 1911. (Photo by Infrogmation of New Orleans)

The Cabildo, located on Jackson Square in New Orleans, originally housed the administrative and legislative council that ruled Spanish Louisiana. The building, rebuilt between 1795 and 1799 after the original was destroyed in the city’s great fire of 1788, took its name from the Spanish governing body that met there, the “Illustrious Cabildo” or city council. It’s served the city as a museum since 1911. (Photo by Infrogmation of New Orleans)

Chaney is co-author of “Hispanic and Latino New Orleans: Immigration and Identity Since the Eighteenth Century.” The book details the impact of Latino culture on the city, which was under the control of Spain for 40 years.

Specific chapters focus on Cubans, Hondurans, Mexicans, Brazilians and Isleños, who are immigrants from the Canary Islands off Africa’s northwest coast.

Chaney says people from predominantly Spanish-speaking nations have said they moved to New Orleans because “The Big Easy” lives up to its nickname.

“Many Latinos find the lifestyle in New Orleans … very comfortable, relaxing, and so forth,” says Chaney, “and, in fact, many of them have mentioned that it reminds them of their home countries.”

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

https://youtu.be/2Z0jqr-q5rQ

MTSU retiree puts Civil War women in spotlight in March 18 lecture

A community historian and descendant of two Civil War great-grandfathers will reveal the contributions of the women of that great national schism in a free public lecture set Friday, March 18.

Shirley Farris Jones

Shirley Farris Jones

Shirley Farris Jones, who retired from MTSU’s Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures after more than 30 years of service, will speak about “Valor and Lace: The Amazing Women of the Civil War” at 6 p.m. March 18 at Oaklands Mansion, 900 N. Maney Ave. in Murfreesboro.

“Without a voice and without a vote, they made their presence known and proved their worth alongside their male counterparts and left no doubt in anybody’s minds that there was a lot more beneath their bonnets than just a bunch of pretty curls,” said Jones of the women in “Valor and Lace,” a chapter included in her book “The Un-Civil War in Middle Tennessee.”

Jones is the author of three other books, including “Murfreesboro in the Civil War,” which she co-authored with retired Motlow State Community College history professor Michael Bradley.

Jones also is a past president of the Rutherford County Historical Society, a member of the Association for the Preservation of Tennessee Antiquities, a founding member of Friends of Stones River National Battlefield and a member of the Martha Ready Morgan Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

Tickets are $15 per person. Light refreshments will be served. Reservations are required. Contact Oaklands Mansion at 615-893-0022 or by email at info@oaklandsmansion.org.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)