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MTSU facilities wind down operations as winter break approaches

MTSU facilities are winding down operations as the fall 2014 semester ends and winter break approaches.

All MTSU offices are open regular hours through Tuesday, Dec. 23.

MTSU will be closed for winter break beginning Wednesday, Dec. 24, through New Year’s Day, Jan. 1.

During this quiet time on campus, most MTSU food venues are closed. Those open and their hours include:

  • Monday-Friday, Dec. 15-19: KUC coffee and doughnuts while they last, 8-10 a.m., and KUC Subway, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Student Union Dunkin Donuts, 8 a.m.-2 p.m.
  • Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 20-21: All campus food venues closed.
  • Monday-Tuesday, Dec. 22-23: KUC coffee and doughnuts while they last, 8-10 a.m.; Student Union Dunkin Donuts, 8 a.m.-2 p.m.
  • Wednesday-Thursday, Dec. 24-Jan. 1: All campus food venues closed.

The MTSU Student Union and the James E. Walker Library will be open 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Dec. 15-19 and 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Dec. 22-23. Both will close Dec. 24 with the rest of the university.

Facilities at the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center are closed through Jan. 11. Campus Recreation offices will be open 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. weekdays through Dec. 23 and will close Dec. 24 for winter break.

MTSU offices and most facilities will reopen at 8 a.m. Friday, Jan. 2. Students will return to campus for spring 2014 classes on Tuesday, Jan. 20.

For more information on MTSU scheduling, visit the university’s academic calendar. The MTSU Student Unions information page, the Walker Library home page and the Campus Recreation page also have links to facility operating hours.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Website ranks MTSU among best for online computer science degrees

ComputerScienceOnline.org recently listed MTSU University College’s online degree offerings among the “Best Online Computer Science Degrees” for 2015.

Click the image to view the rankings.

Click the image to view the rankings.

Computer Science Online, a resource for online learning in computer science and related fields, says it analyzed data from hundreds of colleges offering computer science degrees online. The company developed a scoring system to see which schools ranked highest across a dozen central computer science and tech-related disciplines.

The company says the included programs offer a wide variety of degree specializations as well as the flexible learning options of an online program. To create the list, the company looked at metrics such as tuition costs, student-teacher ratios, graduation rates, accreditation and more.

MTSU offers a bachelor’s degree in Information Technology that can be earned fully online. The information technology degree is part of the university’s Professional Studies program, designed for distance and nontraditional students through University College.

“MTSU is aware that most adults who pursue an online degree are looking for the skills necessary to move up in their current job, or are seeking the skills to make a career change,” said Dr. Mike Boyle, dean of MTSU’s University College. “The challenge is making the degree flexible enough to fit into their busy life. The Professional Studies Degree was designed to fit the needs of working adults.”

Boyle said he was not surprised to learn that this program was so highly rated and is pleased that an external organization “recognizes that we have successfully combined high quality instruction into a flexible learning environment. Our goal is to make it possible for adults meet their career goals, while fulfilling their life obligations.”

Dr. Mike Boyle

Dr. Mike Boyle

MTSU’s Professional Studies program prepares students for management level positions, with foundation courses in statistics, international context, communications, and supervision. In the Information Technology concentration, courses center on software analysis, database management, data communications, and operating systems.

Rankings can be found at http://www.computerscienceonline.org/degree-programs/.

“Computer science is one of the fastest growing education programs available,” said Doug Jones, founder of Computer Science Online. “The diversity of related career fields is expansive and the opportunities are endless.”

Information technology, cybersecurity, computer engineering and other related career fields and education specializations are all relatively new as technologies have advanced from what they were 20 years ago, the company says.

“Students wishing to enter one of the fastest-growing career fields have more options than ever,” Jones said. “These schools offer students the flexibility of online learning options from high-quality, accredited institutions.”

For more information about MTSU’s program, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/programs/professional-studies/.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

Free MTSU Guardian app turns cell phone into virtual security guard

MTSU students, faculty and staff can download a free app that turns their cell phone into a virtual security guard while they’re on campus.

The MTSU Rave Guardian is a free mobile app, available on iTunes and Google Play, that students, faculty and staff can use by signing up with their MTSU email addresses.

This iPhone screenshot shows the features available in the MTSU Rave Guardian app.

This iPhone screenshot shows the features available in the MTSU Rave Guardian app.

The app transforms a mobile phone into a personal safety device by setting up a virtual safety network of friends, family and campus police. Features include:

  • A panic button, which provides a direct immediate connection to campus police with GPS location and personal profile information in case of emergency.
  • Personal guardians — Users can identify friends, roommates and family as “guardians,” along with campus police. Users also can set timers, which will allow their guardians and campus police can check their status during a session. If the timer isn’t deactivated before it expires, MTSU police are automatically provided with the user’s profile to proactively identify and check in on the individual.
  • Sending tips — Users can also send tips, including photos, to campus police if they see something suspicious on campus.

Whenever students, faculty or staff connect with University Police from their mobile phone, the app automatically delivers a complete caller profile with their connection, including current location, medical conditions, course schedule, addresses, campus ID photo and other critical data.

While the MTSU campus remains a very safe environment, University Police Chief Buddy Peaster is encouraging the campus community to take advantage of the app as an added layer of protection and safety.

Chief Buddy Peaster

Chief Buddy Peaster

“The MTSU Rave Guardian puts important information and campus police assistance at your fingertips,” Peaster said.

“Staying safe on campus means partnering with MTSU to make technology and police services work for you. MTSU Rave Guardian does just that.”

Download the app for iPhones at iTunes or go to Google Play for Android devices.

For more information about MTSU Rave Guardian, including answers to Frequently Asked Questions, visit http://police.mtsu.edu/guardian.php.

The MTSU Rave Guardian app is separate from the MTSU Alert4U emergency notification system, which sends text, email, and/or voice alerts regarding campus emergencies to those whose contact information is included in the system.

All staff, faculty and students at MTSU automatically receive email alerts from the Rave Mobile Safety system, including weather-related emergencies, delays and cancellations. Campus users who also want to receive text or voice alerts can visit  www.getrave.com/login/mtsu and log in with a PipelineMT username and password to update their information.

For more information about the emergency notification system, go to www.mtsu.edu/alert4u.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU will test campus tornado sirens this Tuesday afternoon

MTSU plans to conduct a routine monthly test of its tornado sirens on campus Tuesday, Dec. 9, at 12:20 p.m.

This is a brief, routine test of the system, and no safety actions will be required.

The university notifies the campus and surrounding neighborhoods before these tests each month. Tests are conducted on alternating Tuesdays and Wednesdays to minimize distractions for classes and neighbors.

Members of the campus community can prepare for emergency weather situations anytime by checking MTSU’s list of “safe places” at http://bit.ly/MTSUSafePlaces. You also can make note of the siren-testing schedule by visiting http://mtsunews.com/tornado-siren-testing. Bookmark both sites!

Remember that, in the event of a weather emergency, all students, faculty and staff automatically receive a Rave alert at their MTSU email addresses. If you’re not already receiving text and/or voice alerts too, visit http://mtsunews.com/weather and use the “click here and log in” link to make those notification changes.

MTSU Survey: Consumers’ cheery outlook rising during holiday season

The economic outlook of consumers in three Midstate counties continues to rise heading into the Christmas and holiday season, a good sign for area retailers.

The overall Middle Tennessee Consumer Outlook Index rose to 329 this month, up from 226 in September, according to the latest economic survey by Middle Tennessee State University.

The current poll of 235 randomly selected adult residents of Davidson, Rutherford and Williamson counties was conducted Dec. 1 and 3. The index score is computed by adding the percentage of favorable responses to each survey question and subtracting the percentage of negative responses.

Almost half (46 percent) of local consumers expect to spend more than $500 on Christmas and holiday gifts this year, while almost one in four (23 percent) expects to spend more than $1,000, up from 19 percent last year.

This graphic shows the expected holiday spending of Midstate consumers over the past three years. (Courtesy of the MTSU Office of Consumer Research)

This graphic shows the expected holiday spending of Midstate consumers over the past three years. (Courtesy of the MTSU Office of Consumer Research)

Dr. Tim Graeff

Dr. Tim Graeff

Timothy Graeff, director of the Office of Consumer Research in the MTSU Jones College of Business, which conducted the survey, said the numbers reflect the fact that consumers “feel increasingly more optimistic” about the future of the national economy, local economy, job market and their own personal financial situation.

The survey’s current and future indices also continued to rise, with the “current situation index” jumping from 48 in September to 77 this month while the “future expectations index” rose from 80 to 130 over the same period.

“When consumers begin to feel better about the current state of the economy and they also feel increasingly more optimistic about the future of the economy, such positive feelings can find their way into budgeting and spending decisions,” Graeff said. “ This is especially important as we enter the ever important Christmas and holiday shopping season. … This positive view toward spending could signal healthy sales at the cash register.”

View a pdf version of the full report here or download a .docx version here.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

Long-awaited MT Boulevard project to affect traffic, parking in 2015

An expected spring 2015 start to the long-awaited Middle Tennessee Boulevard improvement project will impact traffic flow and parking on the west side of the MTSU campus during the construction process.

Construction work will begin in the spring to improve this .8-mile section of Middle Tennessee Boulevard between Greenland Drive and East Main Street. This view looks east, toward East Main Street. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

Construction work will begin in the spring to improve this .8-mile section of Middle Tennessee Boulevard between Greenland Drive and East Main Street. This view looks east from the Bell Street intersection with Middle Tennessee Boulevard toward East Main. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

The project is moving forward after the Tennessee Department of Transportation awarded a $670,488 federal grant necessary to begin work on the .8-mile section from Greenland Drive to Main Street along the MTSU campus.

The project will reconstruct the existing four- and five-lane roadway to a consistent four-lane divided street with a median. It will include bike lanes, improved sidewalks and lighting, new traffic signals, decorative crosswalks, landscaping and underground utilities.

MTSU officials said they expect the $11 million project to last roughly two and a half years, during which at least one lane of traffic will always be open in both directions.

University officials said the land needed for the improvements was taken primarily from the main campus side of Middle Tennessee Boulevard to make room for wider lanes and bike lanes, which is part of the overall city traffic plan.

Parking and traffic flow around this stretch of Middle Tennessee Boulevard will be affected, so MTSU administrators are encouraging students, faculty, staff and visitors to seek alternative parking in other lots and take advantage of the university’s Raider Xpress shuttle bus service and the MTSU Mobile app.

Officials with MTSU Parking and Transportation Services are also reminding students that the Raider Xpress shuttle routes are designed to get students from any parking lot on campus to their classes within several minutes of boarding.

The MTSU Mobile app includes real-time tracking of the Raider Xpress shuttles and can be downloaded here. You can find a map of Raider Xpress Blue, Green, Red and Silver routes here.

For campus visitors, a printable campus map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParking14-15. Temporary parking permits are available at the Parking and Transportation Services Office on East Main Street.

Initially, MTSU will lose a portion of three tennis courts during construction, which will cause the courts to be reconfigured, according to MTSU Campus Planning.

This crosswalk at Middle Tennessee Boulevard and Faulkinberry Drive on the MTSU campus will be upgraded as part of an overall improvement project to a section of Middle Tennessee Boulevard by the city of Murfreesboro.

This crosswalk at Middle Tennessee Boulevard and Faulkinberry Drive on the MTSU campus will be upgraded as part of an overall improvement project to a section of Middle Tennessee Boulevard by the city of Murfreesboro.

The west side of campus also will be affected in the following ways:

  • Traffic flow on Faulkinberry Drive will change to “right turn in, right turn out” onto Middle Tennessee Boulevard.
  • A pull-in area for buses will be added to the front of Murphy Center.
  • Signalized pedestrian crossings will be added at Lytle and Division Streets, and crosswalks at Bell Street and Faulkinberry Drive will be upgraded.
  • Brick walls with signage will be erected at the corners of Greenland Drive, and another wall will be added at East Main Street, to better define the university’s boundaries.
  • Flagpoles will be erected at Faulkinberry Drive.

The Murfreesboro Transportation Department applied for the supplemental grant funding necessary to cover the additional cost of construction.

The TDOT grant allows the city to make up the deficit in the estimated overall construction cost. MTSU provided a $167,622 contribution for the required 20 percent local matching funds, according to the city.

“We are delighted to receive the necessary grant funding for this important part of the Middle Tennessee Boulevard Improvement Project,” Transportation Director Dana Richardson said in a city of Murfreesboro news release. “We hope to bid for the project sometime in the latter part of 2014.”

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

City Schools Education Day packs MTSU’s Murphy Center (+VIDEO)

The video message inside the MTSU Murphy Center scoreboards read: “MAKE SOME NOISE!”

The video messages were not really needed as nearly 7,000 students from 12 Murfreesboro City Schools and the Homer Pittard Campus School kept the Monte Hale Arena’s noise level at the max during the third Education Day field trip, this time for the Blue Raiders-Clemson Tigers women’s basketball game.

When the youngsters saw the message, noise levels became deafening — apparently pushing the Raiders intensity to peak and affecting the Atlantic Coast Conference Tigers, who committed numerous turnovers and an off-day shooting as MTSU, 3-2, cruised to a 69-28 victory before 11,307 fans, second largest in the program’s history.

http://youtu.be/TUB3nwjmErw

Education Day III marks the continuing partnership between MTSU, which operates Campus School, which is part of the Rutherford County school system, and the city’s schools. The alliance exposes students — some for the first time — to a college campus.

Sitting on the very back row of the bleachers on the track level, Bradie McCarty, 11, a sixth-grade student at Bradley Academy, was fully intent on “yelling and screaming and losing my voice.”

So were the rest of McCarty’s peers, who began cheering — and yelling — before 10 a.m., more than one hour before tipoff, and throughout the game.

The event featured a science/mathematics “hula hoop” game, won by Reeves-Rogers Elementary. Overall Creek, Scales, Cason Lane and Campus School also participated.

“To do it (an activity) in science was fun,” said Jaxyn Luscinski, a Reeves-Rogers fourth-grader, who scored one of her team’s two points as players from five teams used a large sling-shot to get the ball to land inside the hula hoop.

“What I learned is that when you push or pull the sling, it makes you get from one place to another.”

“They’re excited,” said Reeves-Rogers Principal Laurie Offutt, whose team — Luscinski, O’mutwali Rulikira, Jaylen Moore, Savanna Syharath and Kenneth Harper — received five small, MTSU blue basketballs as the prize, and her school later won the musical chairs. “One more game and we sweep.”

Students from all five teams received T-shirts from MTeach, which produced the educational event and is a secondary mathematics and science teacher preparation program at MTSU.

MTSU Athletic Marketing’s mascot basketball game was more like mascot mania or mayhem as various school mascots joined MT’s Lightning in a short game during halftime when the Blue Raiders led 46-12.

Teriana Covington, 12, of Black Fox, utilized her quickness to score eight points.

“This was 100 percent fun,” Covington said.

MTSU aerospace assistant professor Nate Callender “walked over to hang out” with his daughter, Elizabeth, 6, a kindergarten student at Campus School, while son Ian, a Campus School fifth-grader, got to hang with his buddies in the rafters.

“It’s a good day,” Elizabeth Callender said. “I’ve been excited about it.” Brother Ian added that he “would have made the sling shot lower to the ground” in order to score more points for the hula hoop game.

Nate Waddell, 9, a John Pittard Elementary School fourth-grader, said the best part for him “was watching the basketball game.”

The Raiders’ Olivia Jones and her teammates kept the crowd loud throughout the game, which was MTSU’s third consecutive Education Day victory.

Cooper Lebo, 10, a Discovery School fourth-grader attending his third straight Education Day game, said he “likes watching the basketball players because they make good, long-range shots. It gets more fun every year.”

Murfreesboro City Schools Director Linda Gilbert sat through an early portion of the game with MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee. Eventually, she ventured to the track level “to walk around and hope everything is going smoothly — and everybody at MTSU makes it go smoothly.”

“This exemplifies what happens all during the year between MTSU and Murfreesboro City Schools,” Gilbert added, referring to the Education Day. “This captures the fun, education and collaboration.”

Erma Siegel, Hobgood Elementary, Mitchell-Neilson and Northfield were the other city schools sending students to the game.

Rutherford County and City Schools combined to bring the students to the game and return them to their schools with about 50 buses.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Reeves-Rogers student O’Mutwali Rulikira, left, celebrates his team’s victory Dec. 3 in the hula hoop math-science contest during Education Day pregame activities with teammates Jaxyn Luscinski, Jaylen Moore and Savanna Syharath as event emcee Nick Montgomery, an MTSU MTeach participant and senior physics major,and MTSU senior biology major and MTeach student Roseanna McCall look on behind the youngsters. (MTSU photos by Darby Campbell)

MTeach participant and MTSU senior biology major Roseanna McCall, left, helps Reeves-Rogers student Savanna Syharath calculate a winning trajectory in the math-science hula hoop contest Dec. 3 during the MTSU-Clemson women’s basketball pregame activity.

MTSU senior biology major Roseanna McCall, left, an MTeach participant, helps Reeves-Rogers student Savanna Syharath calculate a winning trajectory in the math-science hula hoop contest Dec. 3 during the MTSU-Clemson women’s basketball pregame activity.

MTSU senior physics major and MTeach participant Nick Montgomery provides directions for the five teams competing in the hula hoop contest Dec. 3 during Education Day. The math and science activity was held before the MTSU-Clemson women’s basketball game, which drew a near-record 11,307 fans to Murphy Center.

MTSU senior physics major Nick Montgomery, an MTeach participant and event emcee, provides directions for the five teams competing in the hula hoop contest Dec. 3 during Education Day. The math and science activity was held before the MTSU-Clemson women’s basketball game, which drew a near-record 11,307 fans to Murphy Center.

ACE Learning Center food drive boosts MTSU Student Food Pantry

MTSU’s Student Food Pantry welcomed a needed boost that restocked its shelves just in time for the holiday season.

MTSU’s University Honors College joins the participants in a recent food drive sponsored by the ACE Learning Center to benefit the MTSU Student Food Pantry. Shown left to right are Becca Seul, pantry coordinator and MT One Stop coordinator; Dr. Phillip Phillips, associate Honors College dean; Susan Lyons, event coordinator for the Honors College; Honors College dean Dr. John Vile; James Taylor, an MT One Stop enrollment counselor and food pantry assistant; and Kerry Boylan, outreach coordinator for the ACE Learning Center. (Photos submitted)

The Ann Campbell Early Learning Center, previously known as Project Help, held a food drive in conjunction with community partner Jones Therapy Group that resulted in more than 3,000 pounds of donated food collected for the pantry.

Located in the Student Services and Admissions Center, which also is known as the MT One Stop, the MTSU Student Food Pantry is available to any currently enrolled student who shows a valid student ID.

Students with longer-term food needs are referred to community partners such as Greenhouse Ministries.

The pantry has been accessed more than 300 times in the month of November alone, according to Becca Seul, the operation’s founder and a coordinator at MT One Stop.

“We could not serve our students’ needs without the thoughtful donations of our campus and community partners,” Seul said.

“This month, we had two large food drives provide over 9,000 pounds of food for our holiday rush. BIG thanks to the ACE Learning Center, Jones Therapy and all that participated in the CUSA food drive! Your generosity is helping us to feed many hungry students!”

In addition to the ACE Learning Center and Jones Therapy contribution, the pantry benefited from the recent Conference USA food drive competition, which collected more than 6,000 pounds of food at various athletic and other campus events a few weeks ago.

Among the large contributors to recent MTSU food drives were the Department of Economics and Finance and the Department of Health and Human Performance.

Young helpers from the Ann Campbell Early Learning Center help pack food donated during a recent food drive held on behalf of the MTSU Student Food Pantry.

Since the student pantry opened two years ago, it has been visited more than 900 times, Seul said. Homeless and foster-care students are among those who use the pantry, and students who are between paychecks or whose campus meal plans have run out also obtain food there.

The pantry accepts nonperishable items with valid use-by dates. Among the most needed items are canned fruits and beans, pasta, peanut butter, crackers, fruit cups, rice, cereal, bottled water and ramen noodles.

You can find a complete list of needed items at www.mtsu.edu/foodpantry.

Donors can drop off food items during the MT One Stop’s operating hours: Monday-Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Fridays from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

The Student Services and Admissions Center is located on the east side of campus at MTSU Boulevard and Blue Raider Drive. Visitor parking is available off MTSU Boulevard.

Those wishing to help monetarily can also donate online at www.mtsu.edu/foodpantry. The pantry now has an MTSU Foundation account, which allows Seul to stock up on items available in bulk at less cost.

For more information, contact Seul at 615-494-8910 or becca.seul@mtsu.edu, or visit www.mtsu.edu/foodpantry.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

 

A young helper from the Ann Campbell Early Learning Center helps pack food donated during a recent food drive held on behalf of the MTSU Student Food Pantry.

James Taylor, an MT One Stop enrollment counselor who helps with the MTSU Student Food Pantry, is shown with donations given by the University Honors College during a recent food drive sponsored by the ACE Learning Center.

MTSU closes Nov. 27-28 for Thanksgiving holiday

MTSU will be closed Thursday and Friday, Nov. 27-28, and no classes will be held Wednesday through Saturday, Nov. 26-29, in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday.

Fall semester classes will resume Monday, Dec. 1, at their regular times and all business offices will return to their normal 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. operating hours that day.

The last day of fall 2014 classes will be Wednesday, Dec. 3, followed by a study day Thursday, Dec. 4. Final exams are set Dec. 11.

True Blue Thanksgiving graphic croppedThanksgiving dinner for students staying on campus will be served in the Scarlett Commons Clubhouse from 2 to 5 p.m. Thursday. The MTSU Parent and Family Association will provide the food, which will be catered by MT Dining/ARAMARK. The Housing and Residential Life staff will set up and serve the meal.

Here are hours of operation for individual buildings and departments on campus:

  • James E. Walker Library — open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday; closed Nov. 27-29; open from 1 p.m. Sunday to 2 a.m. Monday.
  • Student Union — open from 6 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday; closed Nov. 27-29; open from 4 to 10 p.m. Sunday.
  • Campus Recreation Center — open from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday; closed Nov. 27-30; reopens at 6 a.m. Dec. 1.
  • Student Health Services in the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center — open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday; closed Nov. 27-30.
  • Campus Pharmacy in the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center — open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday (drive-through open until 4:30 p.m.); closed Nov. 27-30.

ARAMARK/MT Dining locations’ holiday schedule is updated online at www.mtdining.com. Click “Locations”; each location’s individual page will provide opening and closing information.

In case of campus emergencies during the holiday weekend, call MTSU Police at 615-898-2424.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Update: Several Little Raiders still need Secret Santas for Christmas

Several MTSU Little Raiders still need a Secret Santa for this year’s holiday gift-giving campaign for needy children and youth in the Blue Raider community.

MTSU University Police Sgt. Vergena Forbes stands next to one of the three Christmas trees on campus that holds the Little Raiders ornaments. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

MTSU University Police Sgt. Vergena Forbes stands next to one of the three Christmas trees on campus that holds the Little Raiders ornaments. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

Through Friday, Dec. 5, you can “adopt” a Little Raider by picking a numbered ornament hanging on Christmas trees across campus. The ornaments will list a needy child’s age, gender, clothing size and wish list.

Secret Santa participants are asked to pick a numbered ornament from a tree at one of the following two remaining locations and to register as a Secret Santa at that location.

• June Anderson Center for Women and Nontraditional Students on the third floor of the Student Union, 1768 MTSU Blvd.
• MTSU Campus Recreation Center lobby, 1848 Blue Raider Drive

The Middle Tennessee State University Police Department, June Anderson Center for Women and Nontraditional students and Campus Recreation Center again are partnering with the Golden Key Honor Society, MTSU OWLS (Older Wiser Learners) and MT Lambda to sponsor the campaign.

The effort targets the children of low-income MTSU students as well as the children of parents receiving assistance from the local Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Program.

Donated items should be dropped off to the University Police Department by Friday, Dec. 5.

For more information about the campaign, contact University Police Sgts. Vergena Forbes or David Smith at 615 898-2424.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)