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‘Preserving African-American Historic Places’ is site’s focus

Individuals and groups that want to save important remnants of African-American history now have a new resource to guide them, thanks to MTSU’s Center for Historic Preservation.

Griggs Hall, the first building constructed in 1923 on the campus of Nashville’s American Baptist College, is on the cover of a new online research guide, “Preserving African-American Historic Places: Suggestions and Sources," prepared by MTSU's Center for Historic Preservation.

Griggs Hall, the first building constructed in 1923 on the campus of Nashville’s American Baptist College, is on the cover of a new online research guide, “Preserving African-American Historic Places: Suggestions and Sources,” prepared by MTSU’s Center for Historic Preservation.

“Preserving African-American Historic Places: Suggestions and Sources” is an omnibus online site with information on collections care, museum management, heritage tourism and fundraising. You can find it here.

“It ties in with our philosophy of working with communities throughout the state on their preservation needs and interpretive needs,” said Dr. Antoinette Van Zelm, assistant director of MTSU’s Center for Historic Preservation.

Dr. Antoinette Van Zelm

Dr. Antoinette Van Zelm

One example of a site the CHP already has helped to preserve is Griggs Hall, the first building constructed in 1923 on the campus of Nashville’s American Baptist College.

A marker erected by the Tennessee Historical Commission details how the school was an incubator for civil rights activism during segregation.

Other potential preservation sites include businesses, cemeteries, churches, farms, homes, neighborhoods and lodges.

Over the years, center staff and students have compiled numerous links to historic structure reports, heritage development plans, nominations to the National Register of Historic Places, driving and walking tour brochures and posts from the CHP’s blog, “Southern Rambles.”

“We want to make sure that people have access to different projects and programs that are similar to what they may want to do,” said Van Zelm.

CHP logo webSome organizations tie their preservation of the past to the enlightenment of future generations by setting aside an area for continuing education, she added.

“For example, some of the African-American schools that no longer exist after integration … have alumni associations, and they’re interested in preserving the school or opening up a heritage classroom,” Van Zelm said.

For more information, contact Van Zelm at 615-898-2947 or Antoinette.VanZelm@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Alumni of the Sitka Rosenwald School in Gibson County, Tennessee, pose in front of the building with Amanda Barry, back row left, a Center for Historic Preservation graduate research assistant. (Photo submitted)

Alumni of the Sitka Rosenwald School in Gibson County, Tennessee, pose in front of the building with Amanda Barry, back row left, a Center for Historic Preservation graduate research assistant. The former students shared their experiences at the school with Barry for community history purposes. (Photo submitted)

Latest Tennessee Business Barometer shows pessimism stabilizing

Tennessee business leaders’ pessimism about the current economy appear to be stabilizing, though their outlook for the future isn’t strong, according to the latest online survey by MTSU’s Jones College of Business.

The statewide Tennessee Business Barometer index remained stable in April, registering 144 compared to 146 in January and 325 for the inaugural survey last July. The quarterly index is a collaboration between Middle Tennessee State University and the Tennessee Chamber of Commerce & Industry to capture the mood and outlook of business leaders through online surveys.

This chart shows the results of the quarterly Tennessee Business Barometer's overall index and sub-indices since July 2015. (Courtesy of the MTSU Office of Consumer Research)

This chart shows the results of the quarterly Tennessee Business Barometer’s overall index and sub-indices since July 2015. (Courtesy of the MTSU Office of Consumer Research)

Dr. Tim Graeff

Dr. Tim Graeff

While business leaders showed more optimism about their current situations in the latest survey, that was offset by a drop in confidence in the future economy as well as the ability for their own business to prosper and grow, according to Dr. Tim Graeff, MTSU professor of marketing and coordinator of the index through the MTSU Office of Consumer Research.

“Business leaders are more upbeat about the Tennessee economy than they are about the overall national economy,” Graeff noted.

The survey showed concerns about rising health care costs, political and economic uncertainty, difficulties with finding qualified employees, and the potential for increasing regulation remain foremost on the minds of business leaders.

TN Barometer square graphic-newThe index is computed by adding the percentage of positive responses to each question and subtracting the percentage of negative responses. The overall index score is totaled from four sub-indices: current economic situation, future economic expectations, business/firm performance and employment outlook.

A pdf copy of the full report is available at http://bit.ly/tbbapr16. Previous reports are available through the MTSU Office of Consumer Research’s website at www.mtsu.edu/consumer.

The current online survey of 83 business leaders from across Tennessee was conducted between April 1 and April 16. The margin of error is 10.7 percent. Respondents include business owners, vice presidents, senior managers, and managers at firms of various sizes. The next Tennessee Business Barometer survey is planned for July 2016.

For more information, contact Graeff at 615-898-5124 or tim.graeff@mtsu.edu. For more information about the Tennessee Chamber of Commerce and Industry, visit www.tnchamber.org.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

This graph shows how the quarterly Tennessee Business Barometer's overall index and sub-indices have trended since July 2015. (Courtesy of the MTSU Office of Consumer Research)

This graph shows how the quarterly Tennessee Business Barometer’s overall index and sub-indices have trended since July 2015. (Courtesy of the MTSU Office of Consumer Research)

‘Summer Experiences’ website compiles MTSU summer camps info

If you’re considering a summer camp for your youngsters, there are endless options.

MTSU offers dozens of choices — music, sports, journalism, something of a scientific nature and more — but the university has made it easier for anyone planning to attend a camp on campus.

MTSU head soccer coach Aston Rhoden, center, offers advice to a group of young players at a MTSU soccer camp in this file photo.

MTSU head soccer coach Aston Rhoden, center, offers advice to a group of young players at a MTSU soccer camp in this file photo.

The recently launched MTSU Summer Experiences website, http://mtsu.edu/camps, brings nearly 60 opportunities to the table.

With so many camps throughout campus, MTSU officials realized a central location to enable campers and their families to view all the options would be beneficial.

“We have launched a new site hoping to provide summer activities to everyone from young children to adults,” said Andrew Oppmann, vice president of marketing and communications at MTSU.

“The Summer Experiences site has a range of camps, seminars and other educational activities, including learning a new language, aviation, a number of sports camps, storytelling and the prestigious Governor’s School for the Arts.”

The list includes CUSTOMS, the university’s annual orientation with 10 two-day sessions for incoming freshmen and eight one-day sessions transfer students throughout the spring and summer.

The Web list features the camp name and primary contact, dates and deadlines, cost, a brief description and the age group the camp targets.

Along with the annual MT Sampler Camp — which gives invited high school students an opportunity to discover all aspects of the 500-acre campus — here’s a sampling of summer choices at MTSU:

  • The Wright Music Building houses both the Stamps Baxter School of Music July 12-25 for ages 8 and over and Southern Girls Rock & Roll Camp July 25-30 for high school girls.
  • Got crime scene investigation in your genes? The CSI:MTSU 2016 will be held June 21-24.
  • MTSU athletics offers baseball for ages 6-12, boys’ and girls’ basketball, soccer and volleyball camps for various ages.
  • Young people also can choose from camps focusing on yoga, high school cheerleading, guitar, French, Chinese and Spanish languages and more.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Alex Lomis, left, observes MTSU flight instructor Zach Hutcherson following cockpit and airplane safety precautions June 3 in the Introduction to Aviation Camp at Murfreeesboro Airport. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

Alex Lomis, left, of Nashville observes MTSU flight instructor Zach Hutcherson following cockpit and airplane safety precautions in this June 2015 file photo from the Introduction to Aviation Camp at Murfreesboro Airport. (MTSU file photo by Randy Weiler)

MTSU Global Studies exhibit honors Midstate migrants’ diversity

MTSU’s Global Studies Program is encouraging the Middle Tennessee community to attend a unique multimedia exhibit in Murfreesboro honoring the cultural diversity in the region through stories of migration.

Organized as a class project of Global Studies at Middle Tennessee State University, the “Migration with Dignity in Middle Tennessee” exhibit is open now through Wednesday, April 27, at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County, 225 W. College St. in downtown Murfreesboro.

This photograph and brief bio of migrants Amir Cizmic and wife Tea are an example of the types of displaysthat will be in the "Migration with Dignity in Middle Tennessee" exhibit, set to be shown April 17-27 at the Heritage Center of Rutherford County in downtown Murfreesboro. (Submitted)

This photograph and brief bio of migrants Amir Cizmic and wife Tea are an example of the types of displaysthat will be in the “Migration with Dignity in Middle Tennessee” exhibit, set to be shown through April 27 at the Heritage Center of Rutherford County in downtown Murfreesboro. (Photos submitted)

Free and open to the public, the exhibit includes 17 individual testimonies of migrants and their families from different countries of origin who now all call Tennessee their home. Several pieces of student artwork from MTSU professor Sisavanh Houghton’s painting class, as well as video excerpts, are included in the exhibit.

The Heritage Center is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday-Friday.

Project sponsors include the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County, MTSU Department of Art-Painting, MTSU Experiential Learning Scholars Program, MTSU Global Studies, Nashville Public Library and Southern Organizing of Latino Educators.

Organizers said part of the impetus for the project was to create a different public conversation about the migration experience that recognizes the shared humanity of all Tennesseans as well as an interdependent past, present, and future.

This artwork from MTSU senior Micah Ramey will be on display April 17-27 at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County as part of “Migration with Dignity in Middle Tennessee” exhibit. (Submitted photo)

This artwork from MTSU senior Micah Ramey will be on display through April 27 at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County as part of “Migration with Dignity in Middle Tennessee” exhibit. 

Student project participants such as Ashley McFarland, a Spanish major and Italian/global studies minor, have learned the value of this project firsthand.

“I come from a small town near Chattanooga, Tennessee, and I never really thought much about migration, about how people feel,” McFarland said. “My participation in this process, however, has been a life-changing experience because I now think about what it is like to migrate and live here.”

Murfreesboro native Dalton Cantrell, an MTSU history major and global studies minor, echoed those sentiments.

“More than just a class project, Migration with Dignity fosters understanding about who we are and who we want to be as a community,” he said. “This project has encouraged people my age to actually step out of our comfort zones and view the world in a different way.”

For participant Mia Kozul, a global studies major and sociology minor, the project is very personal because of her family’s experience as refugees from Bosnia and Herzegovina.

“Coming to the United States has opened doors for us that were completely closed in our home country. We are blessed to be here,” she said. “ I am happy that our project seeks to honor these experiences.”

For more information about the Migration with Dignity exhibit, contact MTSU student and project co-coordinator Sam Hulsey at samuelkhulsey@gmail.com or 615-587-8559 or MTSU faculty adviser Dr. Antonio Vásquez at antonio.vasquez@mtsu.edu.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

This artwork from MTSU senior Mary Alday will be on display at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County as part of “Migration with Dignity in Middle Tennessee” exhibit. (Submitted photo)

This artwork from MTSU senior Mary Alday will be on display at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County as part of “Migration with Dignity in Middle Tennessee” exhibit. 

This artwork from MTSU student Autumn Galloway will be on display at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County as part of “Migration with Dignity in Middle Tennessee” exhibit. (Submitted photo)

This artwork from MTSU student Autumn Galloway will be on display at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County as part of “Migration with Dignity in Middle Tennessee” exhibit. 

This artwork from MTSU junior Alena Mehic will be on display at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County as part of “Migration with Dignity in Middle Tennessee” exhibit. (Submitted photo)

This artwork from MTSU junior Alena Mehic will be on display at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County as part of “Migration with Dignity in Middle Tennessee” exhibit. 

City unveils new MTSU-branded fire engine at game [+VIDEO]

Murfreesboro Fire and Rescue Department and Middle Tennessee State University unveiled the city’s newest fire engine, complete with the university’s logos and colors, at a brief ceremony April 16 before the Blue-White spring football game.

Here’s a recap:

https://youtu.be/mtYUmestyCU

The new truck will become MFRD’s Engine 3. The company, located on Mercury Boulevard, is the unit closest to the university’s campus.

The truck made its grand entrance just before noon in the Greenland Drive parking lot next to the Blue Raiders Athletic Association tailgate and near the Kennon Athletic Hall of Fame. A brief press conference was held in front of the new fire truck, and Blue Raider cheerleaders and the university’s mascot, Lightning, posed with fans for pictures and will hand out posters.

From left, Murfreesboro City Councilman and MTSU alumnus Doug Young; Danielle Mayeaux, MTSU assistant athletic director; Murfreesboro Fire and Rescue Department Chief Mark Foulks; and Andrew Oppmann, vice president of marketing and communications at MTSU stand in front of the new MTSU-themed fire truck unveiled on campus Saturday, April 16, that will serve the university campus from Station No. 3. (MTSU photo)

Murfreesboro City Councilman and MTSU alumnus Doug Young, left, joins Danielle Mayeaux, MTSU assistant athletic director; Murfreesboro Fire and Rescue Department Chief Mark Foulks; and Andrew Oppmann, vice president of marketing and communications at MTSU, in front of the new MTSU-themed fire truck unveiled on campus April 16 that will serve the university campus from Station No. 3. (MTSU photos)

“We are very proud to have Middle Tennessee State University in our city, and excited to increase the partnership between the university and the city as a whole,” said Fire Rescue Chief Mark Foulks.

“Displaying the university logos on our apparatus that responds to MTSU is a great way for us to show that MFRD is True Blue.”

MFRD-PatchThe Blue Raider Athletic Association and the university’s Office of Alumni Relations hosted a tailgate event at the Greenland Lawn before the game.

After the tailgate, the Middle Tennessee football team concluded spring drills with the annual Blue-White Spring Game presented by Kroger.

Visit GoBlueRaiders.com for a Spring Game recap and for more information about Blue Raider athletics.

 

 

MTSU fans get their first look at the new MTSU-themed Murfreesboro Fire and Rescue Department truck unveiled Saturday, April 16, before the Blue-White Spring Game. The fire truck will serve the university campus from Station No. 3. (MTSU photo)

MTSU fans get their first look at the new MTSU-themed Murfreesboro Fire and Rescue Department truck unveiled April 16 before the Blue-White Spring Game. The fire truck will serve the university campus from Station No. 3.

MTSU cheerleaders sit on the new MTSU-themed Murfreesboro Fire and Rescue Department truck unveiled Saturday, April 16, before the Blue-White Spring Game. The fire truck will serve the university campus from Station No. 3. (MTSU photo)

MTSU cheerleaders sit on the new MTSU-themed Murfreesboro Fire and Rescue Department truck unveiled April 16 before the Blue-White Spring Game. The fire truck will serve the university campus from Station No. 3.

MTSU on Saturday helped dedicate the new Murfreesboro Fire and Rescue Department truck that will serve the university campus from Station No. 3. (MTSU photo)

MTSU helped dedicate a new Murfreesboro Fire and Rescue Department truck April 16 that will serve the university from Station No. 3, located on Mercury Boulevard near the campus. (MTSU photo)

MTSU-created guide to county’s Civil War battles now available

MTSU has produced a new pamphlet that will enhance any Civil War buff’s understanding of the combat that took place in Rutherford County.

Click on the image to see a PDF of the complete pamphlet.

Click on the image to see a PDF of the complete pamphlet.

“The Country All Around Was Laid Desolate: Rutherford County’s Civil War Battles” is free and available now at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County, 225 W. College St.

The center is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Blake Cantrell, an American University of Rome student who interned at the MTSU Center for Historic Preservation, wrote the text in collaboration with the staff of the Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area.

CHP logo webMaps and illustrations from the Civil War period also help explain the Battle of Murfreesboro, the Battle of Stones River, the Battle of Vaught’s Hill, the Battle of Hoover’s Gap and the Battle of the Cedars.

“This booklet provides a great overview of the battles that raged across our landscape during the Civil War,” said Leigh Ann Gardner, an interpretive specialist for the Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area.

Tenn Civil War Natl Heritage Area logo web“It is a fantastic addition to our publications available on the county’s rich history.”

The Heritage Center is a joint venture among the CHP, the Heritage Area, Main Street: Murfreesboro/Rutherford County and the city of Murfreesboro. Additional support comes from Rutherford County government and State Farm Insurance.

A digital copy of the pamphlet is available at www.hcmrc.org. For more information, visit that site or call 615-217-8013.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Forrest Hall task force to hold final meeting April 19 at MT Center

The MTSU Forrest Hall task force will hold its final meeting Tuesday, April 19, at which it will decide its recommendation to the university’s president regarding a possible name change to the ROTC building on campus.

The meeting of the 17-member task force will begin at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday in the MT Center, located inside the Sam H. Ingram Building at 2269 Middle Tennessee Blvd. A searchable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

The meeting is open to the public. Those planning to attend are reminded of the ongoing construction along Middle Tennessee Boulevard.

The university announced last summer that it would engage the community on the name of the campus building that houses MTSU’s Army Reserve Officer Training Corps program and is named after Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest.

Tuesday’s meeting follows an April 14 meeting at the same location at which task force members deliberated about the issue. Prior to that, three previous meetings were held at which public input was received. There will be no public comment at Tuesday’s meeting, which is strictly for task force deliberations to come to a decision.

The task force, which is made up of students, faculty, alumni and community representatives, is chaired by MTSU professor Derek Frisby, a Civil War historian and faculty member in the Global Studies and Cultural Geography department.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee asked the panel to recommend by this month whether the building should be renamed; retain the name but with added historical perspective; or recommend that no action or change is warranted. The Tennessee Board of Regents would have to approve any recommended name change and the Tennessee Historical Commission would have to give approval as well.

For more information about the task force, including a list of its members, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/forresthall.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)


 

Forrest Hall task force to meet April 14 to consider recommendation

April 12, 2016

The MTSU Forrest Hall task force will meet Thursday, April 14, at which it will discuss making a recommendation to the university’s president regarding a possible name change to the ROTC building on campus.

The meeting of the 17-member task force will begin at 6:30 p.m. Thursday in the MT Center, located inside the Sam H. Ingram Building at 2269 Middle Tennessee Blvd. A searchable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

Dr. Derek Frisby chairs the 17-member task force considering whether Forrest Hall should be renamed. (MTSU photo illustration)

Dr. Derek Frisby chairs the 17-member task force considering whether Forrest Hall should be renamed. (MTSU photo illustration)

Seating will be limited and those planning to attend are reminded of the ongoing construction along Middle Tennessee Boulevard.

The university announced last summer that it would engage the community on the name of the campus building that houses MTSU’s Army Reserve Officer Training Corps program and is named after Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest.

Thursday’s meeting follows three previous meetings in which input from the public was received. There will be no public comment at Thursday’s meeting, which is strictly for task force deliberations, according to task force chairman and MTSU professor Derek Frisby, a Civil War historian and faculty member in the Global Studies and Cultural Geography department.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee asked the panel to recommend by this month whether the building should be renamed; retain the name but with added historical perspective; or recommend that no action or change is warranted. The Tennessee Board of Regents would have to approve any recommended name change and the Tennessee Historical Commission would have to give approval as well.

For more information about the task force, including a list of its members, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/forresthall.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

Student Success/ Budget Meetings open to university community

The university community is being invited to observe upcoming Student Success/Budget meetings hosted by President Sidney A. McPhee along with Provost Brad Bartel; Alan Thomas, interim vice president for business and finance; and Dr. Tricia Farwell, 2015-16 Faculty Senate president.

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

The meetings will be held later this month; the complete schedule is below.

At these meetings, each college dean will highlight accomplishments in pursuing the goals of the university’s Quest for Student Success initiative and the status of the implementation of the goals.

Also, as part of these meetings, deans will present their budget requests for the coming academic year and these funding requests should directly connect to the student success plan.

Launched in 2013, the Quest for Student Success lays out plans to innovate for increased student success in three key areas:

  • recruiting students who value academic success.
  • enhancing the academic experience for students by implementing innovation in curriculum across all disciplines and underscoring the role of quality advising in student success.
  • championing enhancements in administrative processes and eliminating barriers to student success.

The ultimate goal is to raise student retention and graduation rates in line with Gov. Bill Haslam’s Drive to 55 initiative, which aims to increase the number of Tennesseans with a certificate or degree beyond high school.

These Student Success/Budget Request meetings will be held April 25-27 in the Student Union Ballroom and are open to the public. Audience seating will be available. The schedule is as follows:

The MTSU seal is shown on the east side of campus on the Student Services and Admissions Center building. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

The MTSU seal is shown on the east side of campus on the Student Services and Admissions Center building. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

April 25        8:30 a.m. — Jones College of Business
                       10 a.m. — College of Education
                       1 p.m. — College of Media and Entertainment             
                       2:30 p.m. — College of Graduate Studies

April 26        8:30 a.m. — College of Liberal Arts                  
                      10 a.m. — University College                
                       2:30 p.m. — University Honors College

April 27        8:30 a.m. — College of Behavioral and Health Sciences                       
                      10 a.m. — College of Basic and Applied Sciences  
                      2:30 p.m. — James E. Walker Library

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU Department of Art holding April 15 open house at Todd Hall

The MTSU Department of Art invites the campus community to Andrew Todd Hall on Friday, April 15, to celebrate creativity and learn more about its offerings during the “Meet & 3: MTSU’s Department of Art Open House.”

The event, which is free and open to the public, runs from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, with various workshops scheduled from 10 to 11:45 a.m. and from 1:15 to 3 p.m.

The MTSU Department of Art is hosting an open house Friday, April 15, at Andrew L. Todd Hall. The department will be showcasing student work from painting, sculpture, printmaking, clay, graphic design, book arts, letterpress, art education and art history. (MTSU photo)

The MTSU Department of Art is hosting an open house Friday, April 15, at Andrew L. Todd Hall. The department will be showcasing student work from painting, sculpture, printmaking, clay, graphic design, book arts, letterpress, art education and art history. (MTSU photo)

Attendees will be able to attend demos and mini-workshops led by MTSU art department faculty and get first-class tours of Todd Hall, which is located at 542 Old Main Circle in the heart of campus.

A searchable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap. Off-campus visitors attending the event should obtain a special one-day permit from MTSU’s Office of Parking and Transportation at http://www.mtsu.edu/parking/visit.php.Art Open House Todd Hall graphic

Mini-workshops and demos at the open house include: paper marbling, encaustic painting, letterpress demonstration with poster giveaway, raku firing (free clay piece for the first 20 visitors), portrait painting, an etching demonstration and a sandcasting demonstration.

Organizers said the open house is a great opportunity to meet and talk to Department of Art faculty, students and staff, and visit the three floors of its state-of-the-art facilities.

The department will be showcasing student work from painting, sculpture, printmaking, clay, graphic design, book arts, letterpress, art education and art history.

Attendees will also be able to learn more about the department’s different major options and our summer classes that have no prerequisites. Transfer students, community college faculty and students, art teachers and high school students, and the MTSU campus and local communities are encouraged to attend.

For more information about the MTSU Department of Art within the College of Liberal Arts, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/art/ or call 615-898-2455.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

$19K Grammy grant will help MTSU digitize new bluegrass collection

MTSU’s Center for Popular Music is the recipient of another national grant from the Grammy Foundation, this time to digitize an extensive, “historically and culturally significant” live bluegrass audio collection from Indiana music lover Marvin Hedrick.

This rare 45 rpm single by “The Weedpatch Boys,” released in 1963, is part of a large “historically and culturally significant” bluegrass audio collection recently donated to MTSU’s Center for Popular Music by the family of Indiana music lover Marvin Hedrick. Hedrick was a member of the band, as were his two sons. The center received a $19,537 grant from the Grammy Foundation April 6 to preserve and digitize the collection.

This rare 45 rpm single by “The Weedpatch Boys,” released in 1963, is part of a large “historically and culturally significant” bluegrass audio collection recently donated to MTSU’s Center for Popular Music by the family of Indiana music lover Marvin Hedrick. Hedrick was a member of the band, as were his two sons. The center received a $19,537 grant from the Grammy Foundation April 6 to preserve and digitize the collection.

The $19,537 grant will make the center an even greater research resource for MTSU students and faculty as well as scholars from across the world, director Greg Reish said.

“Mr. Hedrick was, among other things, a fixture at the Bean Blossom Bluegrass Festival,” Reish explained. “He lived in Brown County, where the festival’s held, and befriended Bill Monroe and all the other pioneers of bluegrass. He also was very helpful to younger folklorists who took a serious interest in bluegrass.”

Hedrick, a Nashville, Indiana, radio and TV repairman as well as a musician, recorded priceless festival performances and backstage jam sessions as well as impromptu sessions at his shop. He died in 1973.

His sons, Gary and David, donated 167 open-reel tapes, a variety of other sound recordings and photographs to the Center for Popular Music last year for preservation and archiving.

The Grammy Foundation grant, which is one of 20 nationwide announced April 6, will allow the center to “catalog, preserve, digitize and disseminate the tapes and their contents via a dedicated website and the center’s documentary label, Spring Fed Records,” foundation officials said.

“The Marvin Hedrick Audio Collection is one of the most historically and culturally significant collections of live bluegrass recordings in existence,” the Grammy Foundation report concludes.

Click on the logo to visit the CPM website.

Click on the logo to visit the CPM website.

The Center for Popular Music received a similar Grammy Foundation grant in 2013 to organize and archive 3,850 cassette and open-reel tapes of music, oral histories and field recordings of Dr. Charles Wolfe, an MTSU English professor who captured musical and interview audio from hundreds of country, blues and bluegrass music practitioners over four decades.

Wolfe, who died in 2006, also donated his work to the center, which has since made the collection accessible on its website.

“Gary and David Hedrick didn’t want their father’s collection to go somewhere and just languish,” said Reish, an old-time musician who’s attended the Bean Blossom event for the last decade.

“They want it used, listened to and disseminated, and that’s what we’ll do.”

The Hedrick collection, like the 1 million-plus other items that comprise the center’s archives, will now be carefully cleaned and preserved and its contents identified, documented and catalogued. It then will be made accessible to scholars all over the world via a searchable database, Reish said, and MTSU faculty and students can use it for discussion and research.

Click on the logo to see the complete list of 2016 grant recipients.

Click on the logo to see the complete list of 2016 grant recipients.

“As far as disseminating it via Spring Fed Records, wow, that’s a lot of copyright and licensing work for us,” the director said. “This grant money couldn’t be used for that, but we’d love to be able to share the Hedrick collection later on via our built-in channels.”

Along with MTSU’s Center for Popular Music, the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville received a Grammy Foundation grant this year to preserve and share almost 45 years’ worth of rare interviews with country music performers, songwriters and music industry personnel.

Dr. Greg Reish

Dr. Greg Reish

The Grammy Foundation awarded more than $300,000 in its 2016 grants for projects ranging from research with cochlear implants and infants and toddlers with autism spectrum disorder to recovering and digitizing some of the earliest cylinder records ever made.

Other 2016 Grammy grant recipients include the Delta Blues Museum in Clarksdale, Mississippi; the New York Philharmonic; the Ravi Shankar Foundation in Encinitas, California; and the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History.

The Center for Popular Music, one of the nation’s largest and richest repositories of research materials related to American vernacular music, recently celebrated its 30th anniversary and is part of MTSU’s College of Media and Entertainment.

For more information on the Center for Popular Music and its projects and special events, visit www.mtsu.edu/popmusic.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Musician, activist and songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie, left, looks around at the archives at MTSU's Center for Popular Music as center director Greg Reish prepares to point out another portion of the center's extensive collection of rare recordings, photos, manuscripts, videos and the like. Sainte-Marie was on campus for a lecture and special visit during the September 2015 Americana Music Association awards events in Nashville, where she received the Spirit of Americana/Free Speech in Music Award. (MTSU file photo by Andy Heidt)

Musician, activist and songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie, left, looks around at the archives at MTSU’s Center for Popular Music as center director Greg Reish prepares to point out another portion of the center’s extensive collection of rare recordings, photos, manuscripts, videos and the like. Sainte-Marie was on campus for a lecture and special visit during the September 2015 Americana Music Association awards events in Nashville, where she received the Spirit of Americana/Free Speech in Music Award. (MTSU file photo by Andy Heidt)