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‘Freedom Sings’ lauds Seigenthaler at Bluebird Cafe (+VIDEO)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — “Freedom Sings” celebrated its 16th anniversary at The Bluebird Cafe Tuesday night with songs of “truth, justice and equality” in honor of a legendary journalist who devoted his entire career to protecting the First Amendment.

That man was John Seigenthaler.

Seigenthaler, a leading advocate of free speech and long-time editor of The Tennessean, died July 11, 2014, after a successful career defending social justice, human rights and racial equality. All of the songs performed at the world-famous nightclub reflected both his life and his values.

Watch a video excerpt from the tribute below.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nbHdmB9Dfks

Ken Paulson, president of the First Amendment Center and dean of the College of Mass Communication at Middle Tennessee State University, said he created “Freedom Sings” with intentions of a one-time show.

“John understood well that the First Amendment was not just about freedom of the press,” Paulson said offstage. “It projects all freedoms of expression, including art and music.”

John Seigenthaler

John Seigenthaler

The show kicked off in stirring fashion with Nashville singer-songwriting legend Ray Stevens performing his Grammy-winning best-seller “Everything Is Beautiful” as a duet with his singer-songwriter daughter Suzi Ragsdale, who was just a little girl when she sang with him on the original hit.

Country artist Hugh Moffatt performed Bob Dylan’s “The Times They Are A Changin,” a song that represents the kind of change Seigenthaler spent years fighting for, including getting clubbed by a KKK member while coming to the aid of a Freedom Rider in the early 1960s in Alabama.

“It’s hard to exaggerate the courage it took to take these kind of stands at the time in a non-violent way,” Moffatt said offstage of Seigenthaler. “It takes courage to stand against something, but taking a stand in a non-violent way like John did represents another level of courage.”

Suzi Ragsdale joins her father Ray Stevens in singing his hit ÒEverything is BeautifulÓ at The Bluebird Cafe Tuesday night (Oct. 28) as part of Freedom Sings. (MTSU photo by Andrew Oppmann)

Suzi Ragsdale joins her father, Ray Stevens, in singing his hit “Everything is Beautiful” at The Bluebird Cafe Tuesday, Oct. 28, as part of Freedom Sings. (MTSU photo by Andrew Oppmann)

Later in the show, Grammy Award-winning artist Don Henry performed “Abraham, Martin and John,” the moving 1968 song that pieces together the assassination story of three important figures in America’s history: Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr. and John F. Kennedy.

“He was at the front of everything,” Henry said offstage. “It’s funny to think that years later, I would be working with a man that inspired me when I was a kid. So to be here tonight, and sing songs for him, it’s going to feel … well, it’s going to feel like he’s here.”

Henry, along with singer-songwriters Kim Richey and Bill Lloyd, returned to the stage to perform the Pete Seeger classic “Where Have All The Flowers Gone,” a song the trio performed at the first “Freedom Sings” show, which Seigenthaler attended.

“I remember him immediately coming up to me after the show,” Henry recalled. “He gave me a big hug like he knew me for years. That’s how charming he was.”

The show also included performances by Linda Davis, Tim O’Brien, Joseph Wooten and Dez Dickerson.

The evening concluded with “Turn, Turn, Turn,” led by Bill Lloyd. The song, a favorite of Seigenthaler’s, was performed at his funeral service at The Cathedral of the Incarnation.

Dylan Skye Aycock, Seigenthaler News Service

MTSU Greek Row hosts trick-or-treating for mini-goblins Oct. 30

Greek Row will become a happy haunting ground again this year as MTSU’s Panhellenic Council hosts a free pre-Halloween trick-or-treat experience Thursday, Oct. 30.

A stylish witch and twin Captain Americas prowl MTSU’s Greek Row for treats during the 2013 “Trick-or-Treat on Greek Row” Halloween event. This year’s free public event for area youngsters 12 and under is set for Oct. 30. (photo courtesy of MTSU Fraternity and Sorority Life)

“Trick or Treat on Greek Row” is slated for 5 to 8 p.m. Oct. 30 in front of the organizations’ houses at the corner of Alumni Drive and North Rutherford Boulevard in Murfreesboro.

You can find Greek Row on a searchable campus map at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParking14-15.

“The purpose of it is to provide a safe place for children in the community to trick-or-treat,” said Donald Abels, coordinator of Fraternity and Sorority Life.

Inflatable bounce houses, games and activities, face painting and candy galore are in store. Youngsters ages 12 and under are encouraged to come dressed in their favorite costumes.

The event is free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Abels at 615-898-5812 or donald.abels@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU issues ‘all-clear’ notice after reported armed robbery

Middle Tennessee State University has issued an “all-clear” notice Tuesday morning, Oct. 28, after a report of an armed robbery Monday evening, Oct. 27, on the university campus.

MTSU Alert graphicThe following text came from the university’s “Alert Updates” page, located at www.mtsu.edu/alertupdates, which is part of the network of campuswide information sources linked to MTSU’s Rave Mobile Safety emergency notification system.

6:59 A.M., TUESDAY, OCT. 28, 2014, ALL CLEAR: The armed robbery suspects have not been apprehended, but they are not believed to be on campus. Resume normal activity. Please report suspicious activity to MTSU Police at 615-898-2424.

9:33 P.M., MONDAY, OCT. 27, 2014, MTSU ALERT: An armed robbery was reported at the Ellington Human Sciences parking lot. Leave that area immediately and stay away. The suspect was described as a younger black male, wearing a red-and-white striped shirt and carrying a knife. He was accompanied by a small group of four to five other black males. Please report suspicious activity to MTSU Police at 615-898-2424.

The notifications went automatically to all current  MTSU students, faculty and staff via email alerts from the Rave Mobile Safety system. When necessary, the campuswide alerts also include weather-related university scheduling changes, building closures and more.

MTSU students, faculty and staff who also want to receive text and/or voice alerts can click here, log in with a PipelineMT username and password to update their contact information. (Rave Alert FAQs, including adding or changing contact information, are available here.)

When there is not a situation on or near campus warranting emergency alerts, the “Alert Updates” page displays a generic message advising visitors to check back when necessary and to contact the MTSU Police Department if any suspicious activity is observed.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

100-plus take in MTSU True Blue Experience Day in the sciences

Shatima White, second from right, a senior at Central High School in Memphis, Tennessee, shows initiative in discussing an aspect of MTSU assistant professor David Nelson's biology research during the Oct. 17 True Blue Experience Day for the College of Basic and Applied Science in the Science Building. Watching in the front of the class are Joselyn Alvarez, a senior at Hillsboro High School in Nashville, and Tyler Braun of Bell Buckle, Tennessee. He is a senior at Cascade High School, and alreay has already had his application accepted. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

Shatima White, second from right, a senior at Central High School in Memphis, Tennessee, shows initiative in discussing an aspect of MTSU assistant professor David Nelson’s biology research during the Oct. 17 True Blue Experience Day for the College of Basic and Applied Science in the Science Building. Watching in the front of the class are Joselyn Alvarez, a senior at Hillsboro High School in Nashville, and Tyler Braun of Bell Buckle, Tennessee. He is a senior at Cascade High School and has already had his application accepted. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

Tyler Braun received his acceptance letter from the MTSU Office of Admissions two weeks ago.

The Cascade High School senior visited the Murfreesboro campus for the second time Oct. 17 and liked what he saw in the new 257,000-square-foot Science Building, which will be his academic home away from home starting in 2015.

“This place is amazing,” said Braun, a Bell Buckle, Tennessee, resident. “My dad (Sean Braun) helped do the lighting and electrical work. He’s really proud of the building.”

More than 100 people, including 64 prospective students, attended the True Blue Experience Day that emphasized the 11 departments in the College of Basic and Applied Sciences. Students from as far away as Memphis and Bowling Green, Kentucky, spent the day touring campus and talking to university personnel.

Pre-dentistry, a branch of biology, is the area of study Braun plans to pursue.

A 30-minute drive to campus will leave Braun close to family, and he admitted attending MTSU is “far less expensive for the same education.”

Craig Redden, a Bowling Green High School senior, and his mother, Melanie, traveled across the state line for his fourth college visit. An MTSU alumna, Melanie Redden (Class of 1991) wanted her oldest child to see the campus she is both proud and fond of even 24 years later.

“This was a much better visit than I even could’ve conceived,” Craig Redden said. “I’ve been surprised by the depth of opportunities and the immediate availability — the opportunities not just to incoming freshmen, but as you continue an education here.”

MTSU assistant biology professor David Nelson, left, talks about his department and research opportunities with Craig Redden and his mother, Melanie, Oct. 17 during the MTSU True Blue Experience Day for the College of Basic and Applied Sciences. The Reddens are from Bowling Green, Kentucky, where Craig Redden is a senior at Bowling Green High School. Melanie Redden is an MTSU alumna. Earlier, Nelson shared with the entire group about his research in the Science Building.

MTSU assistant biology professor David Nelson, left, talks about his department and research opportunities with Craig Redden and his mother, Melanie, Oct. 17 during the MTSU True Blue Experience Day for the College of Basic and Applied Sciences. The Reddens are from Bowling Green, Kentucky, where Craig Redden is a senior at Bowling Green High School. Melanie Redden is an MTSU alumna. Nelson also talked with the group about his research in the Science Building.

Biology is the field Redden, who scored a 33 on his ACT, plans to pursue wherever he attends college, but the Science Building and its faculty and leaders left an impression.

“It’s a dream come true for a first-time campus visitor,” he said of the facility. “And the entire staff is eager to get going and stay going. That took me by surprise.”

Redden and his mother, who shared fond memories of the late chemistry professor Aaron Todd, listened as assistant professor David Nelson and MTSU junior biology major Larissa Wolf of Murfreesboro talked about their research. Respective biology and chemistry department chairs Lynn Boyd and Greg Van Patten led tour groups.

The Reddens also met with University Honors College Dean John Vile.

Prospective students will have more opportunities for a firsthand look at campus:

  • The final Fall Preview Day will be held Saturday, Nov. 1.
  • Other True Blue Experience Days will be held Jan. 23, 2015, for students in the College of Behavioral and Health Sciences and the College of Liberal Arts and Jan. 30 for prospective students in the College of Mass Communication, the Jones College of Business and the Colelge of Education.
  • Admissions has special Saturday tours planned for Nov. 15 and Dec. 6, with all starting at 10 a.m. in the Student Services and Admissions Center.

To register, visit www.mtsu.edu/rsvp.

University officials urge prospective students apply by Dec. 1 in order to be considered for major scholarships for those who qualify.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU helps highlight October lectures at Heritage Center

MTSU alumni and faculty have been sharing their research and insights on significant people and events from Rutherford County’s 200-plus-year history each Tuesday in October at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County.

 To celebrate October as “Heritage Month” in Rutherford County, the Heritage Center has been hosting free weekly lunchtime lectures Tuesdays at 11:30 a.m. at its location off the Public Square in Murfreesboro, 225 W. College St.

MTSU alumnus Patrick “Pat” Cummins, president of the Native History Association, and association vice president Toye E. Heape were set to discuss the organization’s research into the Trail of Tears during their Tuesday, Oct. 21, lecture at the Heritage Center.

Their talk, “Forgotten Footsteps: Exploring the Cherokee Trail of Tears Alternate Route in Rutherford County, Tennessee,” tracks a little-known route of the forced relocation of the Cherokee people that travels from Readyville, Tennessee, along the east fork of the Stones River to the site of the former Old Jefferson community near Smyrna and on to Nashville.

Dr. Carroll Van West

Tennessee state historian Dr. Carroll Van West, an MTSU alumnus who also serves as director of the Center for Historic Preservation, will speak Tuesday, Oct. 28, on “Murfreesboro’s Historic Architecture.”

His 11:30 a.m. talk will address how the city’s historic buildings and places add to a sense of identity and community and remind us of landmarks lost.

“MTSU always gives back so much to the community,” West said. “We are proud to share our research with everyone in Rutherford County to emphasize how much significant history has happened here over the decades.”

The Oct. 7 lecture, “Rutherford County Cemetery Project,” was presented by MTSU alumni John Lodl, Rutherford County archivist; Michael Fletcher, a graduate research assistant in MTSU’s Center for Historic Preservation; and Catherine Hawkins of the Rutherford County GIS Lab.

They highlighted some of the findings of a countywide cemetery survey currently underway by Rutherford County government with the assistance of the Center for Historic Preservation and the Bradley Academy Museum and Cultural Center. The goal of the project is to digitally map and record all the cemeteries in the county.

Alex Collins, a student in MTSU’s public history program and the director of collections and education at the Historic Sam Davis Home and Plantation in Smyrna, discussed “Davis Women in Mourning: Customs and Practices of the Victorian Age” Tuesday, Oct. 14.

Collins’ talk included the Victorian mourning rituals prevalent at the time Sam Davis, a Confederate Army scout, was hanged and how the women in his family would have observed the practices.

The Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County is a partnership between Main Street Murfreesboro, the MTSU Center for Historic Preservation, the city of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County Government. The facility is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. weekdays.

For more information on activities at the Heritage Center, please call 615-217-8013 or visit www.hcmrc.org. For more information on Heritage Month events in Rutherford County, visit www.nps.gov/stri/planyourvisit/sharingprograms.htm.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Murfreesboro's Old City Cemetery on East Vine Street, shown in this photo, is part of a countywide survey to digitally map and record cemeteries in Rutherford County. The survey is the topic of a free public lecture set Oct. 7 at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County. (Photos courtesy of the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County)

Murfreesboro’s Old City Cemetery on East Vine Street, shown in this photo, is part of a countywide survey to digitally map and record cemeteries in Rutherford County. The survey was the topic of a free public lecture Oct. 7 at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County. (Photos courtesy of the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County)

The Victorian mourning displays practiced in the 19th century at the Sam Davis Home and Plantation in Smyrna, shown here, are the topic of discussion in a free public lecture Oct. 14 at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County.

The Victorian mourning displays practiced in the 19th century at the Sam Davis Home and Plantation in Smyrna, shown here, were the topic of discussion in a free public lecture Oct. 14 at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County.

This map of Rutherford County created from an 1832 survey of Tennessee depicts a little-known route of the Trail of Tears that's the topic of a free public lecture set Oct. 21 at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County.

This map of Rutherford County created from an 1832 survey of Tennessee depicts a little-known route of the Trail of Tears that’s the topic of a free public lecture set Oct. 21 at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County.

This building on North Church Street on the Public Square in Murfreesboro, most recently the home of The Guidance Center, shows the attention to architectural detail in city buildings that Dr. Carroll Van West will discuss Oct. 28 in a a free public lecture at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County.

This building on North Church Street on the Public Square in Murfreesboro, most recently the home of The Guidance Center, shows the attention to architectural detail in city buildings that Dr. Carroll Van West will discuss Oct. 28 in a a free public lecture at the Heritage Center of Murfreesboro and Rutherford County.

Sign up now for new series of fall rape-defense classes at MTSU

The MTSU Police Department is offering another free five-week fall series of RAD, or Rape Aggression Defense, classes beginning Tuesday, Oct. 21, for all female MTSU students, faculty and staff, along with the general public.

The Rape Aggression Defense Class is a program of realistic defense tactics and techniques. It is a comprehensive course for women that emphasizes awareness, prevention, risk reduction and avoidance and progresses to the basics of hands-on defense training.

Certified RAD instructors teach the free course.

Classes will be held each Tuesday from Oct. 21 to Nov. 18 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Attendance at all five sessions is mandatory.

Class size is limited for this new fall RAD course, so the MTSU Police Department is encouraging interested parties to enroll soon.

Participants should email their names and contact information to rad@mtsu.edu. Instructors will notify participants about their enrollment and the class location via email or phone.

For more information about MTSU’s RAD classes, send an email to rad@mtsu.edu.
— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU, agencies urge public to attend Oct. 20 water quality event

Middle Tennessee State University representatives will be among a host of area agencies gathering Oct. 20 in Murfreesboro to educate and engage the public on the importance of protecting the area’s water supply.

In this file photo from the spring, MTSU senior Stuart Montez, a music business major from Little Rock, Ark., volunteered to help cleanup litter in the Sinking Creek wetland area as part of Alternative Spring Break activities. (MTSU file photo by News and Media Relations)

In this file photo from the spring, MTSU senior Stuart Montez, a music business major from Little Rock, Ark., volunteered to help cleanup litter in the Sinking Creek wetland area as part of Alternative Spring Break activities. (MTSU file photo by News and Media Relations)

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation’s Division of Water Resources will host the “interactive” public event, scheduled for 5:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 20, at the Patterson Park Community Center, 521 Mercury Blvd. in Murfreesboro.

The event targets people who live in the Stones River Watershed, an area roughly 921 square miles that includes parts of Cannon, Davidson, Rutherford and Wilson counties. The goal of the event is to help those residents connect, share information, develop relationships and collaborate with others making contributions to water quality.stormwater logo

Residents from all of these counties are asked to share the important responsibility of protecting and improving water resources in the watershed.

“Learn more about our local environment where we live, work and play and network with a variety of organizations,” said Cynthia Allen with MTSU’s Stormwater Program. “The event is set up like a fall festival/Earth Day event geared toward education. Over 25 agencies will be in attendance to share ongoing efforts geared towards research, protection efforts and recreation regarding local streams.”

“This event will be a chance for people to see how water quality is being protected in the Stones River Watershed,” said Meredith Benton, regional director of TDEC’s Nashville Field Office. “It will also be an opportunity for people to find out from the people and organizations already contributing to the effort and how they can be involved with keeping the watershed healthy in the future.”

Watersheds are land areas that drain into a particular stream or lake. TDEC officials say a healthy watershed is important because these waters supply drinking water, water for agriculture, habitat for plants and animals as well as recreational opportunities like swimming, fishing and boating.

The following organizations, groups and state agencies will participate in the event:

  • TDEC Division of Water Resources
  • Stones River Watershed Association
  • Cumberland River Compact
  • Murfreesboro Parks & Recreation
  • Friends of the Greenway
  • Discovery Center
  • Middle Tennessee State University
In this file photo, MTSU student volunteers help plant trees along Garrison Creek in east Murfreesboro in November 2012. (File photo by MTSU News and Media Relations)

In this file photo, MTSU student volunteers help plant trees along Garrison Creek in east Murfreesboro in November 2012. (File photo by MTSU News and Media Relations)

  • MTSU Stormwater Program
  • Motlow State Community College
  • Rutherford County
  • Stones River National Battlefield
  • Metro Nashville
  • City of Murfreesboro
  • City of Lebanon
  • City of Mt. Juliet
  • Wilson County
  • The Nature Conservancy
  • Tennessee Stream Mitigation Program
  • Natural Resources Conservation Service
  • Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency
  • UT Extension
  • S. Army Corps of Engineers
  • Tennessee Department of Transportation
  • Tennessee Department of Agriculture-319 Program
  • Tennessee Department of Agriculture – Forestry
  • Water City USA
  • Tennessee Environmental Council

For more information about this meeting, contact Regan McGahen at 615-532-1175 or regan.mcgahen@tn.gov.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

Cynthia Allen of the MTSU Stormwater Program puts soil around one of dozens of trees planted Nov. 9 along Garrison Creek in Murfreesboro. Allen coordinated a volunteer team of about 40 students for the tree planting event, which was hosted by the MTSU Stormwater Program in partnership with the Tennessee Environmental Council and the city of Murfreesboro.

In this 2012 file photo, Cynthia Allen of the MTSU Stormwater Program puts soil around one of dozens of trees planted along Garrison Creek in Murfreesboro. Allen coordinated a volunteer team of about 40 students for the tree planting event, which was hosted by the MTSU Stormwater Program in partnership with the Tennessee Environmental Council and the city of Murfreesboro.

Chili’s supports Raiders’ Closet with Oct. 20 MTSU benefit

A major restaurant franchise is giving back some of its profits to fund a service for job-seeking MTSU students.

For each special flier presented Monday, Oct. 20, at the Chili’s restaurant at 755 N.W. Broad St. in Murfreesboro, the restaurant will donate 10 percent of the proceeds to Raiders’ Closet.

The Raiders’ Closet founder, Dr. Virginia Hemby-Grubb, will be at the restaurant to hand out fliers to customers as they walk in.

Hemby-Grubb, a professor in the Department of Business Communication and Entrepreneurship, created Raiders’ Closet to provide students with gently used professional attire to wear on job interviews.

“Raiders’ Closet will always be in need of gently used professional suits, accessories and monetary donations, because each time a student secures a suit from our inventory, we must replace it with another suit,” Hemby-Grubb said.

“The ‘give back’ event with Chili’s on Oct. 20 will ensure that Raiders’ Closet has funds available with which to replenish our inventory.”

Raiders’ Closet, which is located in Room 327 of the Keathley University Center, allows students to try on professional clothing items and keep them, free. It depends on donations of both clothing and money to operate.

The Oct. 20 fundraiser is good only at the Northwest Broad St. Chili’s location from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. and is good for all food and nonalcoholic beverage sales.

For more information, contact Hemby-Grubb at 615-898-2369 or virginia.hemby-grubb@mtsu.edu or Jaye Kiblinger at 615-898-2902 or jaye.kiblinger@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

Dr. Virginia Hemby-Grubb displays some of the items available for students preparing for job interviews and new jobs at the newly relocated Raiders’ Closet. (file photo submitted)

MTSU plans routine tornado-siren testing Tuesday

MTSU plans to test its tornado sirens on campus Tuesday, Oct. 14, at 12:20 p.m.

This will be a brief, routine test of the system, and no safety actions will be required.

The university notifies the campus and surrounding neighborhoods before these monthly tests. Tests are conducted on alternating Tuesdays and Wednesdays to minimize distractions for classes and community neighbors.

Members of the campus community can prepare for emergency weather situations anytime by checking MTSU’s list of “safe places” at http://bit.ly/MTSUSafePlaces. You also can make note of the siren-testing schedule by visiting http://mtsunews.com/tornado-siren-testing. Bookmark both sites!

Remember that, in the event of a weather emergency, all students, faculty and staff automatically receive a Rave alert at their MTSU email addresses. If you’re not already receiving text and/or voice alerts too, visit http://mtsunews.com/weather and use the “click here and log in” link to make those notification changes.

MTSU students, faculty will observe fall break Oct. 11-14

MTSU students and faculty will observe fall break Oct. 11-14. (MTSU file photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU students and faculty will observe fall break Oct. 11-14. Classes will resume Oct. 15.(MTSU file photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU students and faculty will observe fall break from Saturday, Oct. 11, through Tuesday, Oct. 14.

Fall semester classes will resume at their regular times Wednesday, Oct. 15.

All MTSU offices will be open their normal hours, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 13-14.

Weekend and fall break hours for the James E. Walker Library are as follows:

  • The library will be closed Saturday and Sunday;
  • Monday hours of operation will be 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; and
  • Tuesday hours of operation will be from 7:30 a.m. to 2 a.m. Wednesday. It will reopen at 7 a.m. Wednesday and resume its regular fall hours.

The Student Union will be open from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10; noon to 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday; and 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesday.

Weekend and fall break hours for the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center are as follows:

  • The Campus Recreation Center fitness facilities will be closed from Saturday through Tuesday. They will reopen at 6 a.m. Wednesday;
  • Campus Recreation Center offices will be open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday; and
  • Student Health Services and the Campus Pharmacy, which are located in the rec center building, will be open 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Tuesday. The pharmacy’s drive- thru will be open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. both days. The pharmacy closes from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for lunch.

For ARAMARK/MT Dining facilities open during fall break, visit http://www.campusdish.com/en-us/CSS/MiddleTennessee.

Prospective students and their parents have plenty of opportunities to visit campus. Visit www.mtsu.edu/rsvp to schedule a tour.  (MTSU file photo by Andy Heidt)

Prospective students and their parents have plenty of opportunities to visit campus. Visit www.mtsu.edu/rsvp to schedule a tour. (MTSU file photo by Andy Heidt)

A special Saturday campus tour Oct. 11 and daily campus tours Monday and Tuesday are full. To schedule a daily tour for other days, call 615-898-5670 or visit www.mtsu.edu/rsvp.

True Blue Experience Days will be held Oct. 17 for prospective students in the College of Basic and Applied Sciences; Jan. 23, 2015, for prospective students in the Colleges of Behavioral and Health Sciences and Liberal Arts; and Jan. 30 for prospective students in the Colleges of Mass Communication, Business and Education.

The Office of Admissions also has special Saturday tours planned for Nov. 15 and Dec. 6, with all starting at 10 a.m. in the Student Services and Admissions Center. The above phone number and website provide ways to register.

University officials urge prospective students and their parents to apply by Dec. 1 to receive priority consideration for major scholarships.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)