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‘MTSU On the Record’ goes wild with animal educator-entertainer

A former MTSU student whose love of animals led him into a wild career will be the guest on the next “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

“Safari Greg” Carter enjoys the company of two baby bears who are being nurtured at the Austin Zoo and Animal Sanctuary in Austin, Texas. (Photo submitted)

“Safari Greg” Carter enjoys the company of two baby bears who are being nurtured at the Austin Zoo and Animal Sanctuary in Austin, Texas. (Photo submitted)

Host Gina Logue’s interview with “Safari Greg” Carter will air from 5:30 to 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 8, and from 8 to 8:30 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 14, on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ).

Carter, former animal ambassador for the Austin Zoo and Animal Sanctuary in Austin, Texas, now performs his “Amazing Urban Safari” with critters in tow for schools, churches, fairs and festivals throughout the country.

A former student of animal and wildlife sciences at MTSU who now lives in the Austin area, Carter honed his skills while living in Nashville, Tennessee. He is a two-time winner of the Tennessee Governor’s Award of Excellence in Education.

Safari Greg logo webOver the past 20 years, Carter’s adventures have included nurturing a baby kangaroo by keeping her in a makeshift pouch tied around his neck and rescuing a huge yellow python snake from under a motel bed. Carter adopted the snake and named him “Banana Bill.”

He has incorporated stories of his animal encounters into assemblies on topics ranging from life sciences to bullying for clients such as the Nashville Predators, the Tennessee Titans, Texas Parks & Wildlife, the National Children’s Museum and the U.S. Department of Defense.

“I honestly have to say that (retired MTSU horse science program director) Dave Whitaker probably had one of the biggest impacts on me during my college years,” said Carter.

“Not only did I do the horse judging, but I also did the livestock judging there as well. And that gave me an opportunity to speak in front of crowds and develop my ability to get up and speak in front of people.”

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

Alumnus’ new L’Amour book revives drive west on ‘MTSU On the Record’

The 19th-century American frontier is returning to life via an MTSU alumnus’ new book.

Tim Champlin

Tim Champlin

Host Gina Logue’s interview with MTSU graduate Tim Champlin on the “MTSU On the Record” radio program first aired Jan. 18 on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ). You can listen to their conversation below.

Champlin LAmour cover webChamplin’s latest book is “The Wild West of Louis L’Amour,” an examination of America’s most popular and prolific author of Western fiction. Champlin is an accomplished author of more than 35 Western novels of his own.

Illustrated with more than 240 images, including full-color photographs, maps and daguerreotypes, Champlin’s nonfiction appreciation of L’Amour analyzes the elder author’s descriptions of landscapes, women, gunfighters, ranchers and other familiar figures of the Old West.

“You could always be guaranteed an exciting story, an exciting tale, some character development, a good hero or heroine you could root for,” Champlin said of L’Amour’s writing style. “It was good escape reading. It was fun.”

Champlin, who is now based in Nashville, graduated from MTSU in 1960 with a bachelor’s degree in English. He earned his master’s degree from Vanderbilt’s Peabody College in 1964. He was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and grew up in the western United States.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

https://youtu.be/RoGSxgai-3A

Alumnus gives MTSU domes for drone, spider research [+VIDEO]

Alumnus John Hurt’s unique donations of geodesic domes to the MTSU aerospace and biology departments will aid unmanned aircraft systems and spider research for students and faculty.

Hurt, a member of the Class of ’82, owns Buffalo Valley, Tennessee-based Zip Tie Domes, which makes 10- to 25-foot structures primarily used for chicken coops and greenhouses.

https://youtu.be/k9Jems_AYig

A pre-law and political science major while attending MTSU, Hurt received a U.S. patent for his geodesic dome kits in 2013 and later patents from New Zealand, Australia and the United Kingdom. The one-time computer programmer worked for 30 years for the state of Tennessee and started Zip Tie Domes in May 2014.

MTSU alumnus and Zip Tie Domes inventor John Hurt, left, uses stainless steel zip ties to connect ends of PVC pipe in a dome constructed in December at the MTSU Farm in Lascassas, Tenn. Waiting to hand him more zip ties is Doug Campbell, MTSU aerospace unmanned aircraft systems manager. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

MTSU alumnus and Zip Tie Domes inventor John Hurt, left, uses stainless steel zip ties to connect ends of PVC pipe in a dome constructed in December at the MTSU Farm in Lascassas, Tennessee. Waiting to hand him more zip ties is Doug Campbell, MTSU aerospace unmanned aircraft systems manager. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

Through his inventive efforts, Hurt’s university generosity includes:

  • Loaning the MTSU Jennings A. Jones College of Business a dome for a team-building class project.
  • Donating two 10-foot domes for biology associate professor Ryan Otter’s spider research.
  • Giving one dome, constructed in December at the MTSU Farm in Lascassas, Tennessee, to the Department of Aerospace for the UAS program.
  • Providing three domes for Tennessee Technological University in Cookeville for poultry research.

“I just wanted to help,” Hurt said of his geodesic dome donations, adding that he’s “open to building another one” at the MTSU farm.

The domes are constructed with 1.5-inch PVC pipe. Stainless steel zip ties hold adjoining ends together, and once the top is added, the dome becomes a solid piece, Hurt said.

Aerospace’s unmanned aircraft systems, or drone, program will use the dome for testing and evaluation purposes in the enclosed environment, said Doug Campbell, who manages the UAS program.

MTSU associate professor Ryan Otter and his biology students will be able to utilize two 10-foot Zip Tie Domes for spider research starting spring 2016. (MTSU file photo by J. Intintoli)

MTSU associate professor Ryan Otter and his biology students will be able to utilize two 10-foot Zip Tie Domes for spider research starting this spring. (MTSU file photo by J. Intintoli)

“When we apply to the Federal Aviation Administration for permission to fly our unmanned aircraft out here, the first thing we have to ensure is that the aircraft is air-worthy,” Campbell said.

“Doing air-worthiness evaluation, doing the hover checks, doing build checks on aircraft we’ve constructed either from kits or individual components and sharing that that build is of sufficient quality to be air-worthy is the objective.”

Development Director Nicole Chitty said the College of Basic and Applied Sciences is excited that the domes have been given to the aerospace and biology departments.

“The domes will be a tremendous help to students in these aerospace and biology programs,” she said.

Otter said the biology department will use the domes as “artificial habitats for use in our field work” related to theDecember 2008 Kingston, Tennessee, coal ash spill.

“In my lab, we work with spiders that live at the edges of rivers and lakes, and when we collect spiders, we look on the tree branches that overhang the water,” Otter explained.

“With these domes, we are hoping to build artificial habitats that spiders will use, so we improve our collection efficiency. We are very optimistic and think they can really help us in our field research.”

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

John Hurt, an MTSU alumnus who invented and received the patent for Zip Tie Domes, donated one dome for aerospace unmanned aircraft systems at the MTSU Farm in Lascassas, Tenn., and two domes for biology-related spider research. While awaiting FAA approval to fly unmanned aircraft, or drones, at the farm, they can be flown inside the dome. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

John Hurt, an MTSU alumnus who invented and received the patent for Zip Tie Domes, looks over a partially completed dome. He donated one dome for aerospace unmanned aircraft systems at the MTSU Farm in Lascassas, Tennessee, and two domes for biology-related spider research. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

Arms race for drones? Alumnus explains on ‘MTSU On the Record’

An MTSU alumnus took on a scientific think tank on the subject of autonomous weapons, also known as drones, on a recent edition of the “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Sam Wallace

Sam Wallace

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Sam Wallace first aired Jan. 11 on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org). You can listen to their conversation below.

Wallace, who works for Archer Advanced Rubber Components in Winston-Salem, N.C., holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Virginia Military Institute and a master’s degree in business administration from MTSU.

In this 2008 file photo, mechanics load a missile onto a Predator unmanned aerial vehicle in Iraq. (Courtesy of the U.S. Air Force)

In this 2008 file photo, mechanics load a missile onto a Predator unmanned aerial vehicle in Iraq. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Air Force)

He served as a U.S. Army officer from 2006 to 2012, was the battery executive officer and a battle captain for a counter-rocket, artillery and mortar intercept mission based at Camp Victory near Baghdad, Iraq, in 2008-09.

In 2010-11, Wallace commanded a mission to support the NATO security forces training mission in Afghanistan during the U.S. surge operation. His unit oversaw the training of more than 8,000 Afghan security force personnel at nine different basic training locations in eastern Afghanistan.

In an Aug. 5, 2015, post to the KurzweilAI/Accelerating Intelligence blog, Wallace rebutted the Future of Life Institute’s call for a worldwide ban on offensive autonomous weapons, commonly referred to “drones” and unmanned aerial systems.

“It would be impossible to completely stop nations from secretly working on these technologies out of fear that other nations and nonstate entities are doing the same,” Wallace wrote.

On the upcoming “MTSU On the Record” program, Wallace said, “You have to continually develop defensive capabilities against any threat that could be existential. You can’t just say, ‘It could be bad. Let’s just not make it.’”

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

Tickets remain for MTSU Alumni & Friends Night with Predators

A limited number of tickets are available for the MTSU Alumni & Friends Night with the Nashville Predators.

MT alumni logo web

Click on the MTSU Alumni logo for information on the “Alumni & Friends Night” event.

The Predators National Hockey League game against the Minnesota Wild will be played at 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 16, at Bridgestone Arena, 501 Broadway, in Nashville.

Predators logo 72Tickets are $45 per person. The price includes both game ticket and a reception; reception-only tickets are $20. The seats are located in sections 330 and 331.

Alumni Relations Assistant Director Paul Wydra says interested alumni and friends of the university should reserve their seats by 4 p.m. Friday, Jan. 8, by calling 615-898-2922 or visiting www.mtalumni.com and clicking on the Predators “Smashville” featured item at the top of the page.

The private reception will begin at 5:30 in the lower concourse D-G Room. Food and non-alcoholic drinks will be provided. A cash bar will be available.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Holiday ‘MTSU On the Record’ programs tap into creativity, comedy

The “MTSU On the Record” winter-break offerings include an entrepreneur whose invention helps him “hold it together” and a not-so-funny look at humor in the workplace.

Dr. Timothy Dunne

Dr. Timothy Dunne

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Zach Dycus, founder of Kangeaux Outdoors, first aired Dec. 28 on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org). Logue’s interview with Timothy Dunne, assistant professor of management, first aired Jan. 4, on WMOT-FM.

You can listen to both conversations below.

Dycus, a former MTSU recording industry major, left his profession to devote all his energies to promoting his creation, the Kangeaux Walkabout.

Zach Dycus

Zach Dycus

The device is a patented foot-long combination of neoprene and Velcro suitable for use with either lanyards or carabiners that holds items together even during rugged outdoor activities like hiking and backpacking.

Dycus said he had put the idea on the back burner while pursuing his recording industry career until his wife encouraged him to go into development.

“My wife had been using it when we were moving, and she was using one of the original prototypes I had made,” Dycus said. “That was when she was, like, ‘You really should do something with this product.’”

Dunne, along with two colleagues, published a study in the academic journal Group & Organization Management of how humor affects supervisor-employee relations in the workplace.

The research found that regardless of whether the boss uses positive humor or negative humor to try to bond with his subordinates, the employees’ existing perceptions of the boss will determine whether that humor will be effective.

“When that’s interpreted within (the context of) a poor relationship, they might see that as very cutting or maybe passive-aggressive or maybe just simply a waste of their time, and they wish that their boss would get down to business,” Dunne said.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

https://youtu.be/7IDfXp_Gv_Y

Hack-MT sponsor LeanKit elevates MTSU computer science alliance

MTSU’s computer science program has been so influential in shaping the careers of Chris Hefley and Amy Henderson they continue to return the favor as alumni.

Hefley, CEO of fast-growing software development company LeanKit in Franklin, Tennessee, and Henderson, who became LeanKit’s director of organizational development focusing on recruiting earlier this year, serve on the MTSU Computer Science Advisory Board.

LeanKit MTSU alumni include, front row from left: Macie Hummer, Anne Blankenship, Chris Hefley, Amy Henderson and Eddie Detvongsa; second row from left: Nathan Perry, Daniel Lesnansky and Brandon Hedge; third row from left: Samantha Meeks, Nick Biddle, Bob Saulsbury and Ryan Oberleitner; and back row from left, Shawn Hartsell, Chris Gunderson, Robert Reaves, Dennis LaFreniere, Ben Henderson, Tommy Norman and Shawn LaCroix. Not pictured are John Allen, Michael Cavopol, Andy Hoover, Jonathan Moosekian and Heather Capps Seay. (Submitted photo)

LeanKit MTSU alumni include, front row from left: Macie Hummer, Anne Blankenship, Chris Hefley, Amy Henderson and Eddie Detvongsa; second row from left: Nathan Perry, Daniel Lesnansky and Brandon Hedge; third row from left: Samantha Meeks, Nick Biddle, Bob Saulsbury and Ryan Oberleitner; and back row from left, Shawn Hartsell, Chris Gunderson, Robert Reaves, Dennis LaFreniere, Ben Henderson, Tommy Norman and Shawn LaCroix. Not pictured are John Allen, Michael Cavopol, Andy Hoover, Jonathan Moosekian and Heather Capps Seay. (Submitted photo)

This fall, LeanKit emerged as title sponsor for the Jan. 29-31, 2016, Hack-MT, a high-intensity, 36-hour event that will be held in the Science Building.

Hack-MT will gather software developers, visual designers, programmers and computer science students from area universities, including MTSU, to form teams to invent new Web platforms, mobile apps and electronic gadgets.

“Hackathons are a great way to identify talented and self-motivated engineers and designers,” Hefley said. “We’re looking forward to working side-by-side with computer science students during Hack-MT.”

“MTSU is where I and 23 other LeanKit team members got their start,” he added. “We see our Hack-MT sponsorship as a way to support a new generation of computer science students entering the workforce.”

Earlier this year, LeanKit bought Firefly Logic, which was co-founded by Henderson in 2004. Firefly was known for its team of software programmers. Its clients included Microsoft, Xamarin, Travelocity and the Country Music Association.

Henderson said “hackathons” such as Hack-MT allow team members to share knowledge and improve teamwork skills.

“We use the hackathon concept at LeanKit to help us come up with new products and features,” she said. “It’s fun for the teams to brainstorm ideas, build them out and then come back together for demos and presentations. We’re looking forward to bringing that same level of positive energy and supportive attitude to Hack-MT.”

Dr. Chrisila Pettey

Dr. Chrisila Pettey

The growth rate in software developer jobs in Tennessee “is one of the largest in the nation,” said MTSU’s Dr. Chrisila Pettey, chair of the largest computer science department in Tennessee with more than 400 majors, an outstanding computer science graduate program and participation in the computational sciences doctoral program.

“And the number of job openings is greater than the number of students graduating from universities in the Midstate area,” Pettey added.

“We need for graduating students to feel like Tennessee is the place to stay because they’ve made connections with industry professionals. The interaction between industry partners (including LeanKit), our students and other Midstate university students through Hack-MT is a chance for networking and community building in a really fun environment.”

A number of LeanKit staff will participate in Hack-MT, which has more than 100 people registered, said Pettey, who expects a capacity of 300 participants by the Jan. 15 deadline.

Other universities with students participating include Belmont and Fisk in Nashville. Pettey said Glenn Acree with the TN STEM Innovation Network has reached out to Lipscomb, Vanderbilt, Tennessee Tech, Tennessee State and UT-Chattanooga.

HackMT72In addition to host MTSU and the TN STEM Innovation Network, the event is a collaboration with Hack Tennessee, whose founders “have hosted more than 20 hack-a-thons locally to “ensure the success and broad reach of our first event,” Pettey said.

For more information, visit hackmt.eventbrite.com.

LeanKit is a software development company whose mission is to “help teams actively work together to deliver customer value faster — building business fitness and strength from within.”

LeanKit is an enterprise lean process and work management software provider. Their products and services enable teams of all types and across all levels of the organization to apply lean management principles to their work.

To learn more about the company — whose 2,000-plus clients include Xerox, CarMax, IBM and Target — visit leankit.com.

By the end of 2016, LeanKit expects to hire 50 more people for its Franklin and the company’s new London office.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU professor, alumni part of Variety’s ‘Music City Impact Report’

MTSU Department of Recording Industry chair Beverly Keel, two university alumni and a former student are included in Variety magazine’s “2015 Music City Impact Report,” which focuses on the people “igniting” Nashville’s latest popularity surge.

Beverly Keel

Beverly Keel

The alphabetical listing of 30 artists, record label chiefs, songwriters, entertainment industry executives and government leaders includes:

  • Brad Belanger, a 2001 MTSU music business grad who, as founder and president of Homestead Management, now guides country newcomer Sam Hunt’s career. He was formerly a videographer and photographer for Keith Urban.
  • Brett Eldredge, a 2008 MTSU university studies graduate and songwriter who was the Country Music Association’s 2014 New Artist of the Year as well as a 2013 nominee.
  • Sam Hunt, who attended MTSU 2003-04 and played football for the Blue Raiders and received a pair of 2016 Grammy nominations — Best New Artist and Best Country Album — Dec. 7 to follow up a trio of 2015 CMA nominations.

Keel, an MTSU mass communication alumna, is the only educator on the 2015 list, which also features new Nashville mayor Megan Barry alongside artists Kacey Musgraves and Justin Timberlake.

Brad Belanger

Brad Belanger

Brett Eldredge

Brett Eldredge

You can click through the complete list here.

This is the magazine’s second annual “Music City Impact Report,” compiled by Variety staff members to “spotlight the talents, producers, execs and key pros igniting the current Nashville boom.”

“I am so honored to be included on this list of industry leaders,” said Keel, who’s touted for her co-founding role in Change the Conversation, a group working to advance women’s country music presence.

“What makes this truly special is that I share this with one of my former students, Brad Belanger. There isn’t a better feeling than seeing your students succeed.

Sam Hunt

Sam Hunt

“I am surrounded on this list by dear friends, such as music supervisor Anastasia Brown. We began our careers together in this town and have supported and encouraged each other for decades. This is a collection of people who have shown up and worked hard day after day, year after year.”

Variety logo webKeel also was mentioned in The Hollywood Reporter’s recent inclusion of MTSU’s recording industry program in its “Top 25 Music Schools 2015.”

Twenty MTSU alumni or former students and faculty from around the university have been nominated for Grammy Awards in the last six years, and seven have won Grammys so far. The annual Country Music Association Awards regularly include nominations for MTSU-trained professionals, including several repeat contenders.

Luke Laird

Luke Laird

In addition to Hunt’s Grammy nominations, repeat-winning alumnus Luke Laird is nominated once again in this year’s Grammys: as a co-writer of Tim McGraw’s Best Country Song candidate “Diamond Rings and Old Barstools” and as co-producer of Musgraves’ second “Best Country Album” nominee, “Pageant Material.”

The 58th annual Grammy Awards will be held Monday, Feb. 16, at Los Angeles’ Staples Center.

You can learn more about MTSU’s recording industry program, part of the College of Media and Entertainment, at www.mtsu.edu/recording-industry.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU iMag: From Homecoming recap to $20M science upgrades

From a look back at the recent MTSU Homecoming activities to a glimpse of the $20 million in renovations now underway on MTSU’s two historic science buildings, the newest digital mini-version of MTSU Magazine covers a broad swath of topics for the university’s growing Web and app audiences.

Available through the MTSU Magazine app for iPads, iPhones and Android devices, the electronic-only version includes multimedia content unavailable in print. The MTSU Mag app is available in the iTunes store (click the image at bottom) and at Google Play.

Click for the free Google Play app.

Click for the free Google Play app.

The latest mini-edition also includes:

• A visual look at MTSU Homecoming weekend.
• The story of one computer science graduate’s effort to facilitate a $1 million gift of technology to her alma mater.
• Interviews with two first-year teachers in Midstate grade schools to gauge the value of the teacher training they received at MTSU’s College of Education.
• And much more!

You can also view digital flip-page versions of the mini-mag here and here.

— Drew Ruble (drew.ruble@mtsu.edu)

MTSU iMagazine-Oct2015-web

Click to get the free app on iTunes.

MTSU’s Jones College recognizes 4 with business awards

MTSU’s Jennings A. Jones College of Business recently honored four business people with awards in recognition of their contribution to business and industry.

Jones College of Business logo-updated• MTSU alumnus Scott Brisson, an executive with financial services firm UBS, received the Young Professional of the Year Award, which recognizes those who have become role models through high achievement at a relatively young age and show potential for even greater accomplishments.

Scott Brisson

Scott Brisson

The Hendersonville resident has a bachelor’s degree in management and an MBA from the Jones College of Business at MTSU. He started his career at J.C. Bradford & Co. before landing at UBS through various industry acquisitions. Brisson now serves as head of service delivery for group operations, where more than 400 employees support UBS’s Wealth Management and Investment Bank business.

• MTSU alumnus Randy Knight, vice president of manufacturing at Nissan’s Smyrna vehicle assembly plant, received the Jennings A. Jones Champion of Free Enterprise Award, which is presented to an individual whose achievements reflect the traditions of free enterprise and who are role models for others.

Randy Knight, vice president of Manufacturing in Smyrna, Tenn.

Randy Knight

In his current position since 2013, Knight is responsible for the plant’s operation, including safety, quality, operations, productivity and environmental compliance. He joined Nissan in 1983 as a production technician in the Smyrna paint plant and has risen through the ranks. He holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from MTSU, is an alumnus of Leadership Rutherford and serves on the Leadership Rutherford Council.

• Janet Miller, head of real estate services firm Colliers International in Nashville, received the Joe M. Rodgers Spirit of America Award, which is given to a business person “who has demonstrated the highest ideals in keeping with the American spirit of innovation, entrepreneurship and commitment to others.”

Janet Miller

Janet Miller

A key player in Nashville’s commercial real estate community for over 30 years, Miller joined Colliers in 2014 as CEO and market leader — responsible for talent development, business and brand development, and all operations — following 21 years as chief economic development officer of the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce. Miller led the 10-county region’s top agency for recruiting companies and working with existing companies on retention and expansion projects and led a team that three times was named a top-10 economic development group in America and worked with over 400 corporations on major job-creation projects.

• David Tincher, plant manager of the General Mills plant in Murfreesboro, received the Jones College of Business Exemplar Award, which is presented to a Jones College alumnus whose personal and professional accomplishments demonstrate that future MTSU graduates can also achieve at a high level.

David Tincher

David Tincher

With degrees in electronic engineering and industrial management from West Virginia University Institute of Technology, Tincher served over 14 years as a C-130 flight engineer and maintenance officer in the West Virginia Air National Guard. He joined General Mills in 1998 as maintenance manager in Murfreesboro and has held positions of increasing responsibility. As plant manager, he led an expansion to make the plant one of the world’s largest producing refrigerated dough and yogurt.

The Jones College of Business is made up of the departments of Accounting, Computer Information Systems, Economics and Finance, Management, and Marketing. For more information, visit www.mtsu.edu/business.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

The Jennings A. Jones College of Business recently recognized recipients of its 2015 Jones College Awards. Pictured, from left, are Aubrey Harwell Jr., holder of the Jennings A. Jones Chair of Excellence in Free Enterprise; Randy Knight, vice president of manufacturing at Nissan’s Smyrna vehicle assembly plant and recipient of the Jennings A. Jones Champion of Free Enterprise Award; Scott Brisson, an executive with financial services firm UBS and recipient of the Young Professional of the Year Award; David Tincher, plant manager of the General Mills plant in Murfreesboro and recipient of the Jones College of Business Exemplar Award; and David Urban, dean, Jones College of Business. Also honored but unable to attend the awards presentation was Janet Miller, head of real estate services firm Colliers International in Nashville and recipient of the Joe M. Rodgers Spirit of America Award. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Recipients of the 2015 Jones College Awards from MTSU’s Jennings A. Jones College of Business gather for a photo after receiving their honors. Pictured, from left, are Aubrey Harwell Jr., holder of the Jennings A. Jones Chair of Excellence in Free Enterprise; Randy Knight, vice president of manufacturing at Nissan’s Smyrna vehicle assembly plant and recipient of the Jennings A. Jones Champion of Free Enterprise Award; Scott Brisson, an executive with financial services firm UBS and recipient of the Young Professional of the Year Award; David Tincher, plant manager of the General Mills plant in Murfreesboro and recipient of the Jones College of Business Exemplar Award; and David Urban, dean, Jones College of Business. Also honored but unable to attend the awards presentation was Janet Miller, head of real estate services firm Colliers International in Nashville and recipient of the Joe M. Rodgers Spirit of America Award. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)