Logo

Center for Popular Music acquires Grammy-winning Spring Fed Records

The Center for Popular Music at Middle Tennessee State University has acquired the renowned Spring Fed Records from the Arts Center of Cannon County.

The Arts Center has donated the Grammy-winning label’s name and rights and sold its existing inventory to MTSU, said Dr. Greg Reish, the Center for Popular Music’s new director.

  Founded in 2002, Spring Fed Records is devoted to issuing unique and historically significant recordings of traditional Southern music, including old-time country, blues and gospel. Among its featured titles are music by Uncle Dave Macon, Sam and Kirk McGee, The Fairfield Four, Frazier Moss and Mississippi John Hurt.

Spring Fed’s compilation of field recordings by pioneering African-American folklorist John Work III won a Grammy in 2008 for its liner notes by former CPM staffer Bruce Nemerov.

The label established a strong partnership with MTSU and the Center for Popular Music from its inception with contributions from Nemerov, former CPM director Paul Wells and the late Dr. Charles Wolfe, a venerated scholar of traditional music.

Dr. Greg Reich

Dr. Greg Reich

“Spring Fed’s regional emphasis on traditional music fits well with the CPM’s mission and will allow us to explore even further the vast repository of historically and culturally significant recordings in the CPM archive,” Reish said.

The Center for Popular Music is affiliated with MTSU’s College of Mass Communication and is housed in the Bragg Mass Communication Building on campus.

Production and marketing of new Spring Fed releases will also work in cooperation with the College of Mass Communication’s highly regarded Department of Recording Industry program, giving students the opportunity to work in a specialized sector of the business.

Beverly Keel, recording industry department chair, said the acquisition is “a wonderful opportunity both for the music of Spring Fed Records and for MTSU, which has one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious music business programs and the highly esteemed Center for Popular Music.

“Our students will get a chance to gain real-world experience by promoting this music and scholars everywhere will have the opportunity to study the history of Spring Fed at MTSU.”

Mass Comm logo croppedKen Paulson, dean of MTSU’s College of Mass Communication, added that the addition of “Spring Fed Records gives MTSU an extraordinary opportunity to use the recordings of the past to enhance the college’s future. The label adds a new dimension to our educational opportunities and underscores the pivotal role the Center for Popular Music plays in the College of Mass Communication.”

Spring Fed will be housed in the Center for Popular Music, and CPM staffer John Fabke will manage its day-to-day operations. A new marketing and sales structure, including a new website, will roll out soon.

The Spring Fed catalog is distributed by City Hall Records of San Rafael, California. Selected titles are also available as digital downloads from Amazon.com, iTunes and CD Baby.

The Center for Popular Music at MTSU is a research center devoted to the study and scholarship of popular music in America. Established in 1985 by the Tennessee Board of Regents as one of 16 Centers of Excellence across the TBR system, MTSU’s CPM maintains an archive of research materials stretching from the early 18th century to the present and develops and sponsors programs in American vernacular music.

For more information on the Center for Popular Music and its projects and special events, visit http://popmusic.mtsu.edu.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Scandinavian study abroad finds ‘happiness’ for MTSU art exhibit (+VIDEO)

MTSU students learned firsthand why the people of Scandinavia’s cozy countries continually top the United Nations’ “World Happiness Report,” and their own report is “Passport to Happiness,” a new art exhibit open through Aug. 15 in MTSU’s Todd Art Gallery.

Click on this exhibit card to see more of the "Scandinavia Abroad" group's adventures at their Facebook page.

Click on this exhibit card to see more of the “Scandinavia Abroad” group’s adventures at their Facebook page.

Created by MTSU students and Danish and Norwegian children during a special MTSU study-abroad program, the art exhibit features multimedia pieces and artifacts created in Denmark and Norway and in America, all focusing on happiness.

Dr. Debrah Sickler-Voigt, MTSU art education associate professor, took seven students to Denmark and Norway in May to study art, stay with area families and teach in local schools for the “Scandinavia Abroad” project.

Brittany Gardner, LeAnne Hannington, Bailey Ingram, Ciara Knight, Whitney Proper, Kaitlyn Roberts and Tucker Webb made the trip, making stops in the capital cities of Copenhagen and Oslo, swimming in the waters of the Arctic Circle, visiting Legoland Billund, climbing mountains and admiring fjords, churches and museums while immersing themselves in the region’s culture.

The students worked with youngsters in the Anna Trolles Skole, or School, in Brenderup, Denmark, and the Svolvær Skole in Svolvær, Norway, to create original works inspired by Scandinavian folklore, art history and visual culture.

The Scandinavian countries — Denmark, Norway and Sweden — regularly rank at the top of the United Nations’ annual “World Happiness Report,” thanks to their solid incomes, top healthcare and schools, and balancing their work and personal lives via generous parental leave and vacation time and inexpensive child care. Combine those factors with scenic vistas and hearty outdoor activities, and it’s no surprise that citizens in those nations where the sun shines only seven hours a day in deepest winter still consider themselves “happy.”

MTSU student Bailey Ingram incorporates the technology of the iPhone into her work with two young students at the Svolvær Skole in Svolvær, Norway, during this summer’s “Scandinavia Abroad” trip. (Photos courtesy of Dr. Debrah Sickler-Voigt)

“We had read that Scandinavians were the happiest because of their high standard of living,” Sickler-Voigt explained during a radio interview this week, “so the students came up with the lessons we taught: how can we communicate the idea of happiness that extends beyond the things we buy and shows quality-of-life happiness.”

The students used their time with their host families in Denmark to brainstorm project ideas for their young charges during their classroom visits.

“We learned a lot about the culture, every ‘little thing’ in life that makes them happy,” Gardner said during the interview. “We did some projects in photography, book arts and paper weaving to show how happy they are.”

“In Norway, we asked children to write sentences in Norwegian and English about things that made them happy. They didn’t come up with ‘shopping’ or ‘money’; they came up with things like ‘my dog,’ ‘my family,’ ‘my friends,’ and it was beautiful,” added Roberts.

The result is a series of projects displayed in the Todd Gallery featuring the children’s work as well as the MTSU students’ art inspired by their experience. The “Passport to Happiness” exhibit also includes hand-carved trolls from the collection of MTSU professor Kent and Lynell Syler’s family, along with original Oleana sweaters and knitted goods from the Norwegian company.

“Our goal for the exhibition guests is to consider the importance of happiness in daily life and how to implement a positive lifestyle by simply enjoying ‘the little things,’” Gardner said. “Everything that the (Scandinavian) students made is up on display, so you can really see what makes them happy.”

You can watch a video Ingram created about the experience below, and other videos are included in the “Passport to Happiness” exhibit, too. More photos and details about the trip are available at www.facebook.com/MTSUScandinaviaStudyAbroad.

 

 

Support for “Passport to Happiness” is provided by the MTSU Office of International Affairs, Todd Art Gallery, Anna Trolles Skole, Svolvær Skole, Nordnorsk Kunstnersenter, Oleana, the MTSU College of Liberal Arts, and Kent and Lynell Syler.

MTSU’s Todd Art Gallery is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and is closed on weekends and state and university holidays.

For more information about the exhibit, including parking and directions, contact Todd Art Gallery Director Eric Snyder at 615-898-5653 or eric.snyder@mtsu.edu, or visit www.mtsu.edu/art.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Celebrating Norwegian Flag Day’s Bicentennial in Svolvær, Norway, in May are, from left, MTSU professor Debrah Sickler-Voigt and her “Scandinavia Abroad” students Kaitlyn Roberts, LeAnne Hannington and Ciara Knight on the front row and Brittany Gardner, Tucker Webb, Whitney Proper and Bailey Ingram on the back row.

MTSU student Brittany Gardner, center left, works with students at the Svolvær Skole in Svolvær, Norway, during this summer’s “Scandinavia Abroad” trip.

‘Saddle Up’ July 31 with MTSU to give happy cowpokes a hand

Get ready to give some of Rutherford County’s finest young wranglers a hand Thursday, July 31, at the annual “Saddle Up” fundraiser for MTSU’s Ann Campbell Early Learning Center.

Some of Rutherford County’s finest cowgirls and cowboys are ready for the annual Saddle Up fundraiser for MTSU’s Ann Campbell Early Learning Center July 31 at the MTSU Foundation House. Get more details by clicking on this photo. (Photos courtesy of the Ann Campbell Early Learning Center at MTSU)

“Saddle Up” gets underway at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, July 31, at the MTSU Foundation House, located at 324 W. Thompson Lane next to the university’s Tennessee Miller Coliseum.

Funds raised at this year’s event will be used to continue expanding services at the ACE Learning Center, which is Rutherford County’s only community- and center-based program serving very young children, including those with special needs.

The center was formerly known as Project Help and was renamed last spring to honor its founder, the late MTSU special education professor Ann Campbell.

For only $50 per ticket, guests can show off their favorite jeans, boots and cowboy hats while they enjoy a Western-themed evening filled with barbecue from Bob’s BBQ, beer donated by Mayday Brewer and wine from Stones River Total Beverage.

Guests will be treated to live music from Rhythm Kitchen as well as a “step & repeat” with Cynthia Jones Photography at Studio C. “Saddle Up” also will include a silent auction featuring spa packages, golf excursions, gift baskets and cards, cookware, trips to the Nashville Zoo, a hosted holiday party and more.

 For information on sponsoring the event and tickets, contact Saddle Up Chair Lindsey Fournier at lindsey.fournier@gmail.com.

Previous “Saddle Up” events have helped the program grow into new classroom space and offer services to older children. The center’s ultimate goal is to operate a one-stop wrap-around educational and therapeutic center for families in Middle Tennessee.

Founded in 1983, the nonprofit ACE Learning Center provides inclusive classes for children ages 3 months to kindergarten, where little ones with developmental delays play and learn with those who are developing typically. A “prep” program helps 3-, 4- and 5-year-olds get ready for public school.

The center also provides home-based services for families of children from birth to age 3 who have developmental delays. It’s affiliated with the Tennessee Early Intervention System and provides hands-on learning experiences for MTSU and Motlow State Community College’s Nursing Program students who work with the children and staff.

Grants from the Tennessee Department of Education through Early Intervention Services and the United Way of Rutherford and Cannon Counties partially fund the ACE Learning Center’s work. Dozens of community organizations and businesses also provide the center with much-needed equipment, toys and consumable items every year.

Tickets also are available by calling the ACE Learning Center at 615-898-2458. You can find up-to-the-minute details on “Saddle Up” 2014, including photos of the center’s children and the silent-auction items, here. You can learn more about the center anytime at www.mtsu.edu/acelearningcenter.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Two of Rutherford County’s finest young wranglers are on the lookout for rustlers and people without tickets to the July 31 “Saddle Up” fundraiser for MTSU’s Ann Campbell Early Learning Center. Don’t get stuck in the hoosegow and miss all the fun!

This busy young cowpoke is packing his saddlebags for the annual “Saddle Up” fundraiser for MTSU’s Ann Campbell Early Learning Center July 31 at the MTSU Foundation House.

Check out new public-access programs on ERC@MT, MTSU’s Channel 9

Wondering about the programming schedule for The Education Resource Channel @ Middle Tennessee, also known as ERC@MT, this summer?

Click on the mini-schedule above for a printable version.

Bookmark this page, www.mtsunews.com/erc-mt, and you’ll stay on top of all the MTSU education access channel’s new offerings.

The ERC@MT channel serves Rutherford and Cannon counties and portions of DeKalb, Smith and Wilson counties.

It airs on Comcast Channel 9 in Rutherford County and DTC Communications’ Channel 195 in Cannon and DeKalb counties and some areas in Rutherford, Smith and Wilson counties. It airs on AT&T U-verse Channel 99 across Middle Tennessee.

The Educational Resource Channel @ Middle Tennessee broadcasts educational programming suitable for all ages 24 hours a day, seven days a week, including nationally recognized documentaries and short films, instructional K-12 series on varied topics, the renowned “Classic Arts Showcase” and NASA Television, as well as special “MTSU Presents:” shows on unique university events and topics.

ERC@MT is expanding its programming this year and also rearranged its schedule appearance to better accommodate viewer needs by beginning each day at 6 a.m. instead of midnight. New programs for the week of July 20-26 and links for information include:

For more information about The Education Resource Channel @ Middle Tennessee, email Gail Fedak at gail.fedak@mtsu.edu.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU workshop trains teachers to help struggling readers

As he floated between the rows of educators inside MTSU’s College of Education Building, literacy trainer Ron Yoshimoto drew lots of laughter but also equal amounts of attention from a group of Tennessee teachers eager to help their struggling students with reading.

Literacy education trainer Ron Yoshimoto, left, demonstrates proper one-on-one reading instruction with veteran Rutherford County educator and education consultant Nancy Duggin during a literacy training session Thursday for about 35 Tennessee educators inside the MTSU College of Education Building. The training was hosted by the Tennessee Center for the Study and Treatment of Dyslexia at MTSU. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

Literacy education trainer Ron Yoshimoto, left, demonstrates proper one-on-one reading instruction with veteran Rutherford County educator and education consultant Nancy Duggin during a literacy training session Thursday for about 35 Tennessee educators inside the MTSU College of Education Building. The training was hosted by the Tennessee Center for the Study and Treatment of Dyslexia at MTSU. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

Yoshimoto, the statewide special education literacy resource teacher trainer for Hawaii, conducted a 40-hour training program that ran July 14-18 and was hosted by the Tennessee Center for the Study and Treatment of Dyslexia at MTSU. Yoshimoto is considered a master trainer of the Orton-Gillingham instructional approach to reading, which emphasizes phonics-based, multi-sensory, hands-on learning.

The training, attended by about 35 educators from throughout the state, focused on how to not only help students who may be suffering from dyslexia, but any students struggling with reading, spelling, writing and reading comprehension. Using a variety of training tools ranging from a bingo-themed game to index cards, Yoshimoto kept his class engaged.

“Sometimes (student) reading comprehension is low, but their listening comprehension is high,” Yoshimoto told the group during a Thursday discussion about how to properly conduct one-on-one reading instruction.

“I don’t want you to overly focus on speed,” he said later as the training continued. “There’s more than speed to think about.”

Workshop participant Cindy Nickerson, a third grade teacher at Lascassas Elementary School in Rutherford County, is excited about using the teaching methods shared by Yoshimoto with her third-graders, who are in a critical transition where “they are switching from learning to read to reading to learn.”

“I wanted something that would help me with those students who are struggling with reading, and this is a very systematic approach that I think will help keep students on track and help those who are struggling catch back up,” she said. “This is one more tool to add to my tool belt to help me really address the differentiating needs of my students.”

Literacy education trainer Ron Yoshimoto, the statewide special education literacy resource teacher trainer for Hawaii, conducts a training session Thursday for about 35 Tennessee educators inside the MTSU College of Education Building. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

Literacy education trainer Ron Yoshimoto, the statewide special education literacy resource teacher trainer for Hawaii, conducts a training session Thursday for about 35 Tennessee educators inside the MTSU College of Education Building. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

Lenise Moore feels the workshop will greatly assist in her role as an instructional coach for teachers at Southside School, a Pre-K through eighth grade school in Lebanon, Tennessee.

“This is one of one of the best workshops I’ve attended for at-risk students,” she said, adding that workshop participants are learning how to effectively help students in one-on-one and small group settings.Dyslexia Center logo web

“We still have middle schoolers who are struggling to read, so this will benefit them as well. We have several English language learners that will benefit, and we have struggling readers at all grade levels that this will help.”

Dr. Jim Herman, director of the Tennessee Center for the Study and Treatment of Dyslexia, said Yoshimoto, who has taught thousands of educators across the U.S., Canada and Singapore, has developed his own comprehensive program within the Orton-Gillingham framework.

“Teachers should have this in their backgrounds to teach,” Herman said. “It’s great for general education, but it’s great for special education also. A special education teacher could really use this to upgrade their reading instruction.”

Herman said there was a waiting list of teachers seeking Yoshimoto’s training and plans are to bring him back to campus next year for a similar session.

“I believe if all teachers had this reading training, our reading scores would go up. It’s that good.”

For more information about the Tennessee Center for the Study and Treatment of Dyslexia and its training programs, visit www.mtsu.edu/dyslexia/index.php, call 615-494-8880 or email dyslexia@mtsu.edu.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

Literacy education trainer Ron Yoshimoto makes a point during a training session Thursday for about 35 Tennessee educators inside the MTSU College of Education Building.

Literacy education trainer Ron Yoshimoto makes a point during a training session Thursday for about 35 Tennessee educators inside the MTSU College of Education Building.

July ‘Out of the Blue’ sizzles with great MTSU news

Have you seen the July 2014 edition of “Out of the Blue,” MTSU’s video magazine, yet? It’s hotter than a summer sidewalk with fascinating stories about university people and places, including news of national and state recognition for work by students and faculty.

Check out this month’s program, produced with help from Lauren Dickens, a graduate assistant in the Office of News and Media Relations, and hosted by senior Chris Davis, who serves as news director for MTSU’s student-run TV station, below to learn more about:

  • The annual “Tennessee Guitar Festival” and the virtuosos who share their music with the campus and community.
  • New educational exchange and research pacts with five Chinese universities, along with a renewed agreement with the renowned Confucius Institute.
  • A unique grant from the Grammy Foundation for the Center for Popular Music to preserve a late professor’s respected research.
  • A national award for EMC Productions, a group of electronic media communication students whose high-definition TV work puts Blue Raider fans in the middle of the action at MTSU ball games.
  • MTSU’s latest Gilman Scholars, a new honor for student-athlete Ebony Rowe and recognition for a professor’s work with STEM education for girls.
  • Summer plans as well as fall semester exhibits for MTSU’s Todd Art Gallery, and more!

 

 

You can watch “Out of the Blue” online anytime at www.youtube.com/user/MTSUOutOfTheBlue or watch on Murfreesboro cable Channel 9 daily at 7 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. and on NewsChannel5+ every Sunday at 3:30 p.m.

“Out of the Blue” also is available on other cable outlets in Middle Tennessee, so check local listings to watch and enjoy the show.

Bookmark the “Out of the Blue” online archives, too, at www.youtube.com/user/MTSUOutOfTheBlue.

New MTSU vice provost has eye on students’ success

MTSU will welcome a new vice provost in September in a job with a singular focus: ensuring the academic success of the university’s students.

Dr. Richard “Rick” Sluder, who currently serves as vice provost for recruitment and outreach at the University of Central Missouri in Warrensburg, will join MTSU’s family Sept. 15 after helping UCM increase its enrollment and leading its initiative to improve student retention and graduation rates.

Dr. Richard Sluder

Dr. Richard Sluder

“Working collaboratively with faculty, staff and students, I am fully committed to doing everything possible to facilitate the success of MTSU students,” Sluder said this week.

“MTSU is an exceptional institution with strong faculty, committed staff and a vibrant campus environment. I look forward to beginning my work, knowing that we can further enhance student persistence and completion rates.”

MTSU launched its “Quest for Student Success” initiative in October 2013, creating extensive reforms aimed at helping its almost 24,000-plus students stay on track academically and complete their degrees. The university’s ultimate goal is to boost the current 52 percent graduation rate to at least 62 percent by 2020.

The MTSU effort works in conjunction with Gov. Bill Haslam’s “Drive to 55” goal to extend the reach of higher education and includes a top-to-bottom review of university operations as well as campuswide town hall meetings to gather even more ideas for student success.

Dr. Brad Bartel

Part of MTSU’s plan includes establishing the new vice provost’s post to provide leadership, vision and strategic planning for student retention and success. The job “will be particularly focused on creating a learning environment where high expectations for student learning are linked to a[n] … effective system of academic support initiatives.”

“We are excited about Dr. Sluder joining the MTSU family,” said University Provost Brad Bartel. “He brings with him a wealth of experience and knowledge about student success issues and a proven track record of accomplishments.”

MTSU’s student success initiative concentrates on:

  • stepping up recruitment of students with greater potential to succeed at a four-year comprehensive university.
  • enhancing students’ academic experience to better ensure their success, including on-campus and online tutoring, more advising and an emphasis on more “high-tech and high-touch” approaches.
  • using more innovative, proven techniques, to help students flourish.

While in the vice provost’s office at UCM, Sluder also was part of a campus effort to establish the Office of Military and Veterans Services to accommodate student veterans and worked to strengthen its partnerships with community colleges, both of which have been high-priority efforts at MTSU. He also served as dean of UCM’s College of Health and Human Services as well as a professor of criminal justice there since 1992.

Sluder earned his bachelor’s and doctoral degrees in criminal justice from Truman State University and Sam Houston State University, respectively, and a master’s degree in human resources management from Truman State. He also worked his way through the ranks of the Adams County, Colorado, Sheriff’s Department, rising to captain and administrator of the adult detention facility there before moving into academia.

“It’s important to note Rick’s strong leadership in building enrollment at UCM, which has climbed to nearly 13,000 students,” said Jeff Murphy, assistant director of university relations at UCM. “Rick is a great problem solver and a versatile educator. MTSU has made an outstanding choice in hiring Rick Sluder, and he will be greatly missed at UCM.”

For more information about MTSU’s Quest for Student Success, go to www.mtsu.edu/studentsuccessYou can watch a video report on last spring’s town hall meetings on student success below.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

 

TV sports journalism is in the picture on ‘MTSU On the Record’

An MTSU alumnus who will help usher in the SEC Network after producing at ESPN will be the guest on the next edition of the “MTSU On the Record” radio program.”

Lewis Harkness

Lewis Harkness

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Lewis Harkness will air from 8 to 8:30 a.m. Sunday, July 27, on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org).

Harkness, a native of Harriman, Tennessee, graduated from MTSU in 1993 after working at the student television station. He began interning at WKRN-TV in Nashville, Tennessee, that same year and worked there for 18 years before becoming a producer of ESPN’s “Sportscenter.”

Beginning in August, Harkness will work for the Southeastern Conference’s new TV network, which will be located in the headquarters of the ESPNU network in Charlotte, North Carolina.

“I never really wanted to be in front of the camera,” said Harkness. “Probably the creative side of me is what drove me to be behind the scenes.”

To listen to previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, go to the searchable “Audio Clips” archives here and here.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

Professor reviews recent Supreme Court rulings on ‘MTSU On the Record’

A review of the most recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions was the focus of a recent edition of the “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. John Vile

Dr. John Vile

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. John Vile first aired July 14 on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org ). You can listen to their conversation here.

Vile is dean of the University Honors College, a constitutional law scholar and author of “Essential Supreme Court Decisions: Summaries of Leading Cases in U.S. Constitutional Law.”

“A lot of times you really cannot understand a modern decision unless you know what it’s reacting against or what it’s overturning,” said Vile.

To listen to previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, go to the searchable “Audio Clips” archives here and here.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

Aug. 9 MTSU Pigskin Pre-Game moves to new Rockvale site

The annual MTSU Pigskin Pre-Game preseason social event will offer another new venue and will be held earlier this year.

Pigskin Pre-Game 2014 graphic webThe event, sponsored by the Office of Alumni Relations and the MT Alumni Association, will start at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 9, at Annalee Acres, 11000 state Route 99, in Rockvale, Tennessee.

For directions, visit www.annaleeacres.com and click on the “Contact” link or call 615-274-3376.

The Pigskin Pre-Game serves as the kickoff for the MTSU Blue Raiders football season each year and a fundraiser for the Alumni Legacy Scholarship.

“All proceeds of this event benefit the Alumni Legacy Scholarship, which is awarded to children or grandchildren of MTSU alumni,” said Paul Wydra, Alumni Relations assistant director.

“We love this event every year because it is a great chance for everyone to get together for a good cause and get ready for some Blue Raider football.”

Wydra added that the alumni association has been “very fortunate with the support Pigskin Pre-Game has garnered through the years and looks forward to having another successful event.”

Ticket prices are $30 for adults. Children 12 and under will be admitted free.

Attendees must pay in advance and RSVP by Wednesday, Aug. 7, to secure their tickets. Admission will include food, beverages, entertainment by the Nashville-based O’Donnells, door prizes and more.

For more information about the event and sponsorship opportunities, or to reserve tickets, call 800-533-6878 or 615-898-2922, or visit www.mtalumni.com.

Payments can be mailed to the Office of Alumni Relations, MTSU Box 104, Murfreesboro, TN, 37132.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

MTSU Pigskin Pre-Game attendees enjoy food and fellowship in this file photo from the 2013 celebration. The 2014 event will be held Aug. 9 at Annalee Acres in Rockvale, Tennessee. (MTSU file photo)

MTSU Pigskin Pre-Game attendees enjoy food and fellowship at the 2013 celebration. The 2014 event will be held Aug. 9 at Annalee Acres in Rockvale, Tennessee. (MTSU file photo)