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‘MTSU On the Record’ studies science savvy for non-science teachers

Teaching teachers how to teach science is the subject of the next “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. Katherine Mangione

Dr. Katherine Mangione

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Katherine Mangione, an assistant professor in MTSU’s Department of Elementary and Special Education, will air from 9:30 to 10 p.m. Tuesday, April 25, and from 6 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, April 30, on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org.

Mangione asserts that student teachers, now known as preservice teachers, need special instruction to familiarize themselves with the lingo of scientific disciplines, especially if they are not particularly science-savvy.

WMOT-new web logo“Vocabulary in science is exceptionally precise,” said Mangione, “so when the science teacher is explaining the concept of a wave, he may mean something different in a physics class, but then your earth science teacher … may be teaching things like P-waves and S-waves before and after earthquakes or ocean waves.”

Mangione, biology professor Cindi Smith-Walters and Alyson Smith Bass, an associate professor of elementary and special education, wrote about their research in the Electronic Journal of Science Education. You can read the article here.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

MTSU hosts tail-wagging 5K trek April 30 to benefit Habitat for Humanity

Human walkers and runners are invited to accompany their furry, four-footed canine companions in the annual fundraiser for Habitat for Humanity set Sunday, April 30, on the MTSU campus.

Two- and four-legged participants make their way around Old Main Circle at MTSU in the 2016 "See Spot Run" 5K Run/Walk for Habitat for Humanity. The 2017 event is set Sunday, April 30. (Photo courtesy of MTSU See Spot Run)

Two- and four-legged participants make their way around Old Main Circle at MTSU in the 2016 “See Spot Run” 5K Run/Walk for Habitat for Humanity. The 2017 event is set Sunday, April 30. (Photo courtesy of MTSU See Spot Run)

The 12th annual See Spot Run 5K Run/Walk, sponsored by the MTSU Office of Student Organizations and Service and the MTSU chapter of Sigma Pi Fraternity, is slated for 8 a.m. April 30.

Registration will begin at 6:45 a.m. race day at Peck Hall. The entry fee before Monday, April 24, is $30, and on race day, the fee will be $35.

Each entry fee includes dry-fit style shirts for all participants and awards for the top age-group finishers. All proceeds will support the MTSU Habitat Blitz Build and Rutherford County Habitat for Humanity.

A discounted group rate of $25 per person is available for organizations that have 15 or more participants. Organizations must pre-register by 4:30 p.m. April 24 in Room 330 of the MTSU Student Union to qualify for the discount.

Although participants aren’t required to run or walk with a dog to enter, those who do bring their pets must provide valid rabies tag numbers. Retractable leashes are prohibited.

See Spot Run logo web

Chip timing is available for all participants. A map of the race route is available online here.

Racers may register online at www.active.com or by mailing in a printable registration form, found here, with payment to MTSU, 1301 E. Main St., P. O. Box 39, Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37132.

For more information, contact the Office of Student Organizations and Service at 615-898-5812 or visit www.mtsu.edu/sos/see-spot-run.php.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU students exhibit interior design ideas at Saturday showcase

Professional interior designers-in-training at MTSU are ready to display what they’ve learned about creating viable work and living spaces in a free showcase open to the public.

Design Student Showcase 2017 flier webThe 2017 Interior Design Student Showcase, presented by the MTSU student chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers, is slated for 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, April 22, in the McWherter Learning Resources Center.

A searchable, printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

“The evening is going to be fabulous!” said Deborah Belcher, chair of MTSU’s Department of Human Sciences.

“We have some wonderful student work, a great vendor, door prizes and the jazzy tunes of local band Les, Chuck and I.”

Student projects on display will include creative and innovative use of textiles, light fixtures, furniture, space planning, construction drawings and computer-aided drawings.

The students will show off their ideas in LRC Rooms 108, 109 and 112 as well as the center’s corridor, lobbies and resource library.

For more information about the 2017 Interior Design Student Showcase, contact Belcher at 615-898-2302 or deborah.belcher@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

An array of textiles and other materials invites visitors to examine the stylistic possibilities at a previous MTSU Student Chapter ASID/IIDA Interior Design Showcase. (Photo courtesy of MTSU Department of Human Sciences)

Psychologists, students discuss narcissism, research at spring meeting

The Middle Tennessee Psychological Association will explore the psychology of narcissism this Saturday, April 22, when MTSU hosts the group’s spring 2017 meeting.

Dr. Alexander Jackson

Dr. Alexander Jackson

Dr. Alexander T. Jackson, an assistant professor of psychology at MTSU, will deliver the keynote address, “Why and When Narcissists Dismiss Advice,” at 10 a.m. April 22 in the State Farm Lecture Hall of the Business and Aerospace Building.

A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

“People often pay incredible sums of money to acquire advice, and, when used, advice tends to lead to more optimal decision-making,” said Jackson. “However, some people seem entirely unwilling to use advice.”

The gathering of the regional group, which is slated for 8:30 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. and is open to the public, will enable MTSU psychology majors to display their posters, discuss their research with academics and other professionals and to make valuable contacts that could benefit them in their post-college careers.

“The meeting provides an excellent opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to present their efforts to colleagues from other colleges and universities,” said Dr. William Langston, an MTSU psychology professor.

The registration fee is $5 for students and community members and $15 for faculty and professionals. Community college and high-school students may attend for free if they register in advance.

All conference events will take place in the Business and Aerospace Building. For more information, contact Langston at 615-898-5489 or william.langston@mtsu.edu. Online registration is closed, but participants may register on site.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU plays role in new museum honoring former slave’s ‘hard bargain’

A rare aspect of American history is on display thanks to the Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area and MTSU students and staffers.

The McLemore House African-American Museum, located in Franklin, Tenn., sits on the corner of 11th Avenue North and Glass Street, across from Johnson Elementary School, in the city's renowned "Hard Bargain" neighborhood. A new historic display, created with help from MTSU students and staff, will be unveiled April 19. (Photo courtesy of VisitFrankin.com)

The McLemore House African-American Museum, located in Franklin, Tenn., sits on the corner of 11th Avenue North and Glass Street, across from Johnson Elementary School, in the city’s “Hard Bargain” neighborhood. A new historic display, created with help from MTSU students and staff, will be unveiled April 19. (Photo courtesy of VisitFranklin.com)

“Building a Future — The Journey from Slavery to Freedom” was unveiled April 19 at the McLemore House African-American Museum, 446 11th Ave. N. in Franklin, Tennessee.

The museum will open for tours on Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. beginning Friday, April 21.

Harvey McLemore was a slave owned by former Confederate cavalry officer W.S. McLemore, who also was a lawyer and judge.

In 1880, as a free citizen, Harvey McLemore purchased land from the judge and built the home where the museum is now located. The house served as home to Harvey McLemore and his descendants for 117 years.

McLemore later purchased more lots, subdivided the 15-acre property and began selling building lots to other former slaves, creating an entire middle-class African-American neighborhood of teachers, carpenters, masons and farmers around the McLemore House.

Because McLemore reportedly had driven a “hard bargain” with the judge for his land, the neighborhood, bordered by 11th Avenue North, Mt. Hope Street, 9th Avenue North and Green Street in Franklin’s downtown area, became known as “Hard Bargain.”

Harvey McLemore’s daughter, Mary McLemore Matthews, seated, and Harvey’s great-granddaughter, Ora Mai Hughes Manier, pose for an undated snapshot. (Photo courtesy of the Heritage Foundation of Franklin and Williamson County)

Harvey McLemore’s daughter, Mary McLemore Matthews, above, and his great-granddaughter, Ora Mai Hughes Manier, pose for an undated snapshot. (Photo courtesy of the Heritage Foundation of Franklin and Williamson County)

“Harvey McLemore’s success anchored the Hard Bargain neighborhood and played a key role in Franklin’s recovery after the Civil War,” said Laura Holder, federal liaison for the Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area, which is administered by MTSU’s Center for Historic Preservation.

This sign erected near the McLemore House African-American Museum in Franklin, Tenn., by the Williamson County Historical Society explains the history of the "Hard Bargain" neighborhood.

This sign erected near the McLemore House African-American Museum in Franklin, Tenn., by the Williamson County Historical Society explains the history of the “Hard Bargain” neighborhood.

Residents, neighbors and other supporters created an organization in 2006 called the Hard Bargain Association, which focuses on preserving the historic neighborhood by rehabbing existing homes, building affordable new homes and turning a cemetery caretaker’s old house into a popular community center called “Ty’s House.”

Heritage Area staff and MTSU students wrote the text for the new McLemore House Museum display with research assistance from the African-American Heritage Society, and MTSU’s Office of Creative and Visual Services designed the display.

“The Harvey McLemore story is a remarkable one, and we are grateful to the MTSU team and others for their hard work and for the great job they have done working with us on this project,” said Alma McLemore, president of the African-American Heritage Society, a nonprofit organization that administers the McLemore House museum.

Other partners in creating the exhibit include the Williamson County Convention and Visitors Bureau, the Heritage Foundation of Franklin and Williamson County, the Battle of Franklin Trust and Franklin’s Charge Inc.

For more information about the Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area, contact Dr. Antoinette Van Zelm, assistant director of the Center for Historic Preservation, at 615-898-2947 or antoinette.vanzelm@mtsu.edu.

To learn more about the McLemore House African-American Museum, call 615-305-0904.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

‘Healthy in College’: Listen to April 11 ‘MTSU On the Record’

Producer/Host: Gina Logue
Guest: Grace Farone

Synopsis: A senior dietetics major talks about mentoring other students in healthy eating and healthy cooking.

In the News: MTSU faculty, staff tackle civility, politics, academic advising

Politics, college advising and liberal arts dominate the latest spate of MTSU faculty expressions in national and international media.

Dr. Mary Evins, a history professor and director of the American Democracy Project, commented on the increase of incivility in political discourse for the Associated Press. The story is available here. At least 18 newspapers affiliated with the wire service published the story.

Dr. Mary A. Evins

Dr. Mary A. Evins

Dr. Andrei Korobkov

Dr. Andrei Korobkov

MTSU WordmarkDr. Andrei Korobkov, a professor of political science, opined on the similarities between the United States political scene and the Soviet Union’s political scene at the end of Perestroika for www.watchingamerica.com. His views are available here.

Leonid Bershidsky quoted Korobkov in an article titled “President Trump’s Boris Yeltsin Moment” published Feb. 15, 2017, by www.bloomberg.com. That article can been seen here.

Korobkov also penned an opinion piece for www.russia-direct.org titled “Trump’s First Days in Office Aggravate Political Crisis in the U.S.” that was published Feb. 2, 2017. It can be accessed here.

Matthew Hibdon

Matthew Hibdon

Lucy Langworthy, academic adviser

Lucy Langworthy

Russia Direct published another Korobkov essay titled “Why Trump Backtracks On His Russia Policy” March 14, 2017. That essay can be accessed here.

Matthew Hibdon, an adviser for the College of Liberal Arts, penned a blog entry for Educause Review titled “The Tools of Academic Advisors and Superheroes.” The entry was published Feb. 8, 2017, and can be viewed here.

Dr. Lucy Langworthy, manager of the College of Liberal Arts’ advising office, wrote an article titled “The Liberal Arts: Always a Story to Tell” for Educause Review’s blog. It was published Feb. 22, 2017, and is available here.

Reporters seeking expertise from MTSU personnel, as well as members of the campus community with expertise for media, may contact Gina Logue in the Office of News and Media Relations at 615-898-5081 or via email at gina.logue@mtsu.edu.

Alumnus discusses finding true African ‘gold’ on ‘MTSU On the Record’

An MTSU alumnus who went to Africa to treat illnesses and managed to find gold will be the guest on the next “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Adam Shulman will air from 6 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, April 23, on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org.

Adam Shulman

Adam Shulman

Shulman’s debut solo photography exhibition, “The Gold of Africa,” is on display through May 6 at Tinney Contemporary Art Gallery, 237 5th Ave. N. in Nashville.

The self-taught photographer took the pictures while working as a medical physicist in Senegal, Rwanda, Zimbabwe, Ghana and Qatar. He spent over a year shooting and editing the photos, which consist of 19 images and five behind-the-scenes videos showing Shulman and the models in action.

WMOT-new web logoThe dynamic images of black men and women decorated with gold on their bodies create a startling contrast as Shulman attempts to convey that the “gold” in Africa is not in a precious metal, but in the hearts and souls of its people.

“The gold substance applied to the models’ bodies was actually just … potting clay,” said Shulman, a Nashville native.

“I would mix it with water, get it into a wet sort of mud, put it on the models’ bodies and then I would use a hair dryer to dry it. As it dried, it sort of hardened and cracked and got the look that it has.”

A product of the University Honors College, Shulman graduated summa cum laude from MTSU with a bachelor’s degree in physics in 2007. He earned his master’s degree in medical physics from Vanderbilt University in 2009.

You can learn more about his work and see some of his “Gold of Africa” photos here.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

‘MTSU On the Record’ dines out with peer-to-peer nutrition mentoring

Students who mentor other students about how to make healthier eating decisions were the focus of a recent “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Grace Farone

Grace Farone

Host Gina Logue’s interview with senior dietetics major Grace Farone first aired April 11 on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org. You can listen to their conversation below.

WMOT-new web logoFarone is one of a handful of students conducting activities to give other students accurate food information under the direction of Dr. Lisa Sheehan-Smith, a professor of nutrition and food science and a registered dietician, through a partnership with Campus Recreation.

The daughter of biology professors Anthony and Mary Farone said she became interested in nutrition after losing the index finger on her right hand to cancer when she was 14 years old.

“Being in a hospital around other health care professionals, I realized how important nutrition was to help prevent other diseases,” said Farone. “I just wanted to help and share with others what I learned.”

Farone, who is right-handed, has been cancer-free since the amputation. She is on track to graduate this May with a bachelor’s degree.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

April 13 ‘Rape Culture’ panel discussion at MTSU is open to public

MTSU will host a conversation designed to redefine some of the most prevalent assumptions surrounding sexual assault during a special panel discussion Thursday, April 13, in the university’s Sam Ingram Building.

“Rape Culture: Let’s Talk About It,” a free public panel discussion in observance of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, will take place from 5:30 to 7 p.m. April 13 in Room 101 of the Ingram Building, located at 2269 Middle Tennessee Blvd.AAUW Mboro logo web

Nearly 1 in 5 women and 1 in 71 men in the United States have been raped at some point in their lives, according to the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey conducted for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The survey also asserts that nearly 1 in 2 women and 1 in 5 men have experienced sexual violence other than rape in their lifetimes.

Panelists will include:

      • Karen Lampert, executive director of the Rutherford County Domestic Violence Program and Sexual Assault Services.
      • Barbara Scales, director of MTSU’s June Anderson Women’s Center for Women and Nontraditional Students.sex assault talk about it logo
      • Amy Dean, MTSU Sexual Assault Intervention liaison.
      • Victor Pigg, health and wellness lab instructor and graduate teaching assistant in the MTSU Department of Health and Human Performance.

In memory of the late Deb Johnson, former executive director of the Rutherford County Domestic Violence Program and Sexual Assault Services, the American Association of University Women’s Murfreesboro chapter also will collect donations of personal hygiene items for the program.

Donations of full-size containers of shampoo, soap, toothpaste, toothbrushes and other new, unused hygiene items are welcomed.

The AAUW-Murfreesboro chapter is sponsoring the April 13 panel discussion. Light refreshments will be served.

For more information, contact Dia Cirillo, president of AAUW-Murfreesboro, at 773-677-4238 or President@AAUW-Murfreesboro.org.

— Gina Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

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