Logo

MTSU entertains public, fights hunger at April 24 ‘End of Semester Show’

MTSU’s entertainment community is coming together Monday, April 24, for an “End of Semester Show” aimed at showcasing campus talent and industry partnerships with an eye toward helping hungry fellow students, too!

End Semester Show 2017 poster webThe program, set for 7 p.m. April 24 in Tucker Theatre, features MTSU recording industry songwriters opening for The Acorn People, a Nashville-based rock band of MTSU alumni.

Admission is a can of nonperishable food, which will be donated to the university’s Student Food Pantry.

CME-logo-webOrganizers from the College of Media and Entertainment, who say this year’s show may be the largest ever, note that the event involves teamwork from students, faculty, organizations, departments and colleges across campus as well as nonprofits and industry donors and partners in the community. For example:

  • Students in a recording industry Sound Reinforcement class are working alongside a Theater Lighting class from the Department of Theatre and Dance to plan and provide sound, lighting and production for the show.
  • Master of Fine Arts students in recording industry will be creating multitrack recordings of the performances.
  • Animation students from the Department of Electronic Media Communication are creating content for a $1.5 million video wall, again donated by veteran EMC partner VER Nashville and most recently used for the MT Raiders Choice Awards, that will be assembled on stage and used during the show.
  • Student-run radio station WMTS and AMP Entertainment, MTSU’s student-run entertainment organization, are providing event promotion.

In addition to VER’s video wall equipment donation, Nashville-based entertainment lighting systems company 4Wall and audiovisual supplier LMG Nashville are also donating equipment for this year’s show.

For more information about the event, email Rachel Helms, coordinator for the College of Media and Entertainment, at rachel.helms@mtsu.edu.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Campus School marks 88 years with open house, honor for former professor

Homer Pittard Campus School’s annual open house, held Tuesday, April 18, welcomed current and former students, faculty, staff and friends to the historic facility on East Lyle Street.

Dr. Clarence "Pete" Greever, circa 1965

Dr. Clarence “Pete” Greever, circa 1965

This year’s theme, “Celebrate the ’60s,” showcased a special decade’s worth of school and world history, and the annual “Stroll Through the Decades” featured fifth-graders portraying historic world leaders, including:

  • musicians Aretha Franklin, Elvis Presley and all four Beatles.
  • athletes Muhammad Ali and Jesse Owens.
  • computer magnates Bill Gates and Steve Jobs.
  • American Red Cross founder Clara Barton.
  • former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.
  • civil rights activists Ida B. Wells, Martin Luther King Jr., Coretta Scott King, Rosa Parks and Nelson Mandela.
  • U.S. presidents from Teddy Roosevelt to the present day, as well as first ladies ranging from Eleanor Roosevelt to Laura Bush.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee was among the dozens of visitors admiring the historic displays and the students’ work. He also joined multiple generations of the late Dr. Clarence E. “Pete” Greever’s family for a special moment of recognition for Greever’s MTSU career, including sons Don and Barry Greever, daughter-in-law Janet Greever, grandson Tom Greever and great-grandson Braxton Greever.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, center, joins multiple generations of the late Dr. Clarence E. “Pete” Greever’s family for a special moment of recognition for Greever’s MTSU career at Homer Pittard Campus School’s annual open house, held Tuesday, April 18, at the school on East Lytle Street in Murfreesboro. Greever, a professor of education at MTSU from 1956 to 1975 and an educator for 37 years as well as a respected artist, was a U.S. Navy veteran and also set up the first greenhouse at MTSU. He died in 2000 at age 86. Shown with McPhee are, from left, grandson Tom Greever, daughter-in-law Janet Greever, great-grandson Braxton Greever, and sons Don and Barry Greever. Braxton, who attends Campus School, is the fourth generation of Greevers affiliated with MTSU. Campus School, which is celebrating its 88th year, is a K-5 teaching laboratory school jointly operated by MTSU and the Rutherford County Schools. (Photo courtesy of Homer Pittard Campus School)

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, center, joins members of the late Dr. Clarence E. “Pete” Greever’s family for special recognition of Greever’s MTSU career at Homer Pittard Campus School’s annual open house, held Tuesday, April 18, at the school on East Lytle Street in Murfreesboro. Greever, a professor of education at MTSU from 1956 to 1975, was a U.S. Navy veteran and also set up the first greenhouse at MTSU. He died in 2000 at age 86. Shown with McPhee are, from left, grandson Tom Greever, daughter-in-law Janet Greever, great-grandson Braxton Greever, and sons Don and Barry Greever. Braxton, who attends Campus School, is the fourth generation of Greevers affiliated with MTSU. (Photo courtesy of Homer Pittard Campus School)

Dr. Greever, a professor of education at MTSU from 1956 to 1975 and an educator for 37 years as well as a respected artist, was a U.S. Navy veteran and also set up the first greenhouse at MTSU. He died in 2000 at age 86.

Braxton, who attends Campus School, is now the fourth generation of Greevers affiliated with MTSU.

Campus School, which is celebrating its 88th year, is a K-5 teaching laboratory school jointly operated by MTSU and the Rutherford County Schools. Dr. Greever, who specialized in curriculum and instruction, helped train future teachers at Campus School.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU artists welcome season at Spring Dance Concert April 20-22

MTSU’s dance students, faculty and guest artists are celebrating a fresh new season at the annual Spring Dance Concert, which is set Thursday through Saturday, April 20-22, in the university’s Tucker Theatre.

MTSU Dance Theatre company members Quinn Cunningham, left, and Saul Rodriguez prepare for the April 20-22 Spring Dance Concert in the university’s Tucker Theatre. (Photo courtesy of Martin O’Connor)

MTSU Dance Theatre company members Quinn Cunningham, left, and Saul Rodriguez prepare for the April 20-22 Spring Dance Concert in the university’s Tucker Theatre. (Photo courtesy of Martin O’Connor)

Performances begin at 7 each evening. General-admission tickets for the Spring Dance Concert are $10 for adults and $5 for K-12 students and MTSU staff. MTSU students will be admitted free with a valid student ID.

This year’s Spring Dance Concert will once again highlight original choreographic works from MTSU dance faculty and selected students and from guest artist Banning Bouldin, an internationally recognized choreographer and artistic director of the Nashville-based New Dialect company, who visited the MTSU Dance Program in March.

The event also will feature pieces that display the scope of MTSU’s dance training and the talents of the university’s dance faculty in contemporary ballet, jazz and modern dance.

MTSU dance faculty member Meg Brooker has restaged three original Isadora Duncan choreographies, presented as “Suite from Orfeo ed Eurydice,” for the spring dance concert.

Marsha Barsky, artistic director of MTSU Dance Theatre, will present an excerpt of “Leaving Home,” a piece she choreographed that also features music by MTSU jazz faculty members Jamey Simmons and Don Aliquo.

Spring Dance Concert 2017 card webThe program also will include works by dance faculty Jennifer McNamara, Windship Boyd and Chell Parkins and by MTSU senior Amber Jordan.

“The MTSU Dance Theatre aims to enrich our campus and local community’s appreciation of concert dance by providing high-quality performances,” Barsky said. “The Spring Dance Concert reflects the dynamic range and diversity of our program.”

Tickets can be purchased online at www.mtsuarts.com or at the door. The Tucker Theatre Box Office will open one hour before each performance for ticket purchases.

A searchable campus map with parking details is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

For more information about the 2017 Spring Dance Concert, visit the MTSU Dance Theatre website at www.mtsu.edu/dance or call 615-494-8810.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Music colloquium draws another top scholar to MTSU for public lecture

The MTSU School of Music is sponsoring a Music Colloquium that will bring another top scholar to campus for a free public presentation on Thursday, April 20.

Dr. Helena Simonett

Dr. Helena Simonett

Dr. Helena Simonett, senior research associate at Switzerland’s Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, will speak at 2:40 p.m. April 20 in Room 101 of the Saunders Building.

A searchable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap. Off-campus visitors attending the lectures should obtain a special one-day permit for each at www.mtsu.edu/parking/visit.php.

School of Music new logo webSimonett’s April 20 presentation, “Yoreme Cocoon Leg Rattles: An Eco-organological Study of a Unique ‘Sound Maker,’” stems from her research among the indigenous peoples of northwestern Mexico.

She received her doctorate in ethnomusicology from the University of California, Los Angeles, and has conducted extensive research on Mexican popular music and its transnational diffusion, as well as exploring the role of indigenous ceremonial music and dance in northwestern Mexico.

Simonett’s publications include “Banda: Mexican Musical Life Across Borders” and “En Sinaloa Nací: Historia de la Música de Banda,” and she edited “The Accordion in the Americas: Klezmer, Polka, Tango, Zydeco, and More!” and co-edited “A Latin American Music Reader: Views from the South.” She also produced the children’s book “Ca’anáriam — Hombre Que No Hizo Fuego” with Bernardo Esquer López in both Yoreme and Spanish with an English translation.

Dr. Joy Calico

Dr. Joy Calico

Dr. Joy H. Calico, the Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Musicology at Vanderbilt University and the first speaker in the 2017 MTSU colloquium, discussed her research on “Noise and Arnold Schoenberg’s 1913 Scandal Concert” March 28.

The Austrian-American composer, known for creating new musical composition methods involving atonality, conducted a concert in the Great Hall of Vienna’s Musikverein that was broken up by a melee and led to legal proceedings.

The MTSU Music Colloquium is a public series that presents scholarship on music and music-related issues concerning the world’s many music traditions. More details are available at www.mtsu.edu/music/colloquium2017.php.

For information on MTSU School of Music events and musical performances, please visit www.mtsumusic.com or call 615-898-2493.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Quick tornado-siren testing planned for MTSU campus Tuesday

MTSU plans to test its tornado sirens on campus and at the Miller Coliseum Complex Tuesday, April 11, at 12:20 p.m.

This will be a brief, routine test of the system, and no safety actions will be required.

If harsh weather is in the area around the time of the scheduled testing, the test will be canceled.

MTSU notifies the campus and surrounding neighborhoods before these tests each month. Tests are conducted on alternating Tuesdays and Wednesdays to minimize distractions for the campus and for neighbors.

Members of the campus community can prepare for emergency weather situations anytime by checking MTSU’s list of recommended shelter locations at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUTornadoShelters. You also can make note of the siren-testing schedule by visiting www.mtsunews.com/tornado-siren-testing. Bookmark both sites!

Remember that, in the event of a weather emergency, all students, faculty and staff automatically receive a Rave alert at their MTSU email addresses. If you’re not already receiving text and/or voice alerts too, visit www.mtsunews.com/weather and use the “click here and log in” link to make those notification changes.

Grammy nominee Allyson joins MTSU students, faculty for April 11 concert

Five-time Grammy nominee Karrin Allyson will join the MTSU Singers and MTSU jazz faculty musicians in a special public concert set Tuesday, April 11, in Hinton Music Hall inside the university’s Wright Music Building.

Karrin Allyson

Karrin Allyson

General admission tickets for the April 11 concert are $10, and high school student tickets are $5 each; all will be available at the door. MTSU students, faculty and staff can attend free with valid IDs.

A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

The MTSU Singers are an audition-only select group of up to 16 student vocalists who perform jazz standards and jazz-style arrangements of popular music, including choral jazz and vocal improvisation.

Joining Allyson and the MTSU Singers will be MTSU faculty members Matt Endahl on piano, Chip Henderson on guitar, Jim Ferguson on bass and Derrek Phillips on drums.

The MTSU Singers, shown in this spring 2017 photo from the group’s Facebook page, will perform Tuesday, April 11, in concert with five-time Grammy nominee Karrin Allyson and members of MTSU’s jazz faculty in Hinton Music Hall inside the university’s Wright Music Building. They’re led by MTSU music professor Cedric Dent, an emeritus member of the 10-time Grammy-winning a capella group Take Six. (Photo courtesy of MTSU Singers)

The MTSU Singers, shown in this spring 2017 photo from the group’s Facebook page, will perform Tuesday, April 11, in concert with five-time Grammy nominee Karrin Allyson and members of MTSU’s jazz faculty in Hinton Music Hall inside the university’s Wright Music Building. They’re led by MTSU music professor Cedric Dent, an emeritus member of the 10-time Grammy-winning a capella group Take Six. (Photo courtesy of MTSU Singers)

“It is a great honor to welcome Karrin, one of the very best jazz vocalists, to MTSU to perform with our jazz singers and jazz faculty,” said Dr. Michael Parkinson, director of the MTSU School of Music, who’s known Allyson since his teaching years in Kansas City.

Dr. Michael Parkinson

Dr. Michael Parkinson

“I have followed her career as it has grown from regional to national to international recognition of her skills. She is a dynamic singer and pianist, a great communicator, and devoted to helping students pursue their career goals.”

School of Music new logo webAllyson has 16 albums to her credit, and five have received Grammy nominations for best jazz vocal album since 2001, including “Ballads: Remembering John Coltrane,” “Footprints,” “Imagina: Songs of Brasil,” “’Round Midnight” and “Many a New Day: Karrin Allyson Sings Rodgers & Hammerstein.”

She lives in New York City and currently spends two days out of three on tour, playing major jazz festivals, concert venues and clubs across the United States, Brazil, Japan, Australia and Europe. Allyson also was a featured vocalist in the “Newport Jazz Festival: Now 60” U.S. and Canadian tour in 2014.

“Karrin brings a wealth of experience to MTSU for her first appearance here,” said Parkinson. “You will not want to miss this! We also appreciate the support of John and Bobbie Duke in helping to underwrite this event.”

For details on more MTSU School of Music performances, call 615-898-2493 or visit the Concert Calendar online.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Stones River Chamber Players take ‘flights’ in April 10 concert finale

MTSU’s faculty ensemble-in-residence, the Stones River Chamber Players, will end their 2016-17 season with “Flights of Fancy,” a free public concert, Monday, April 10.

SRCP logo web

Click on the graphic above to listen to streaming audio performances by the Stones River Chamber Players.

The ensemble members, all of whom teach in MTSU’s School of Music, will perform at 7:30 p.m. April 10 in Hinton Music Hall inside MTSU’s Wright Music Building. A printable campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap.

The classical concert will feature music from composers Alberto Ginastera, Claude Debussy and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

“The Argentine composer Ginastera wrote his ‘Duo for Flute and Oboe’ in 1945,” said Dr. Arunesh Nadgir, coordinator of keyboard studies at MTSU and co-director of SRCP.

“Comprising three individual movements, Ginastera brings a wide spectrum of shades and nuance to the music to make a very vibrant and colorful work.”

Dr. Arunesh Nadgir

Dr. Arunesh Nadgir

Flutist Celine Thackson and oboist Laura Ann Ross will perform the work.

Pianist Nadgir and cellist Felix Wang will present Debussy’s “Cello Sonata,” a hallmark of the cello repertoire. Written in 1915, it was the first of what was to be a series of six sonatas for various instrumentations; Debussy completed only three before he died in 1918.

“Debussy masterfully combines musical elements typically associated with the Baroque period along with modern cello techniques such as left-hand pizzicato, ponticello and false harmonics,” said Nadgir. “Because of this, he’s able to create a fresh, colorful and varied musical landscape.”

Mozart’s “Quintet for Piano and Winds” will be the final work on the April 10 program. The composer wrote to his father that “I myself consider it to be the best thing I have written in my life.”

Ross and Nadgir will be joined in the quintet by clarinetist Todd Waldecker, bassoonist Gil Perel and Angela DeBoer on the horn.

School of Music new logo web“It’s a staple of chamber music for winds and piano, and this quintet overflows with Mozart’s charming, poignant and witty melodies,” said Waldecker. “It’s like a fully staged opera for five instrumentalists.”

You can listen to streaming audio performances by the Stones River Chamber Players at www.mtsu.edu/music/srcp.php.

For details on more MTSU School of Music performances, call 615-898-2493 or visit the Concert Calendar online.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

MTSU takes audiences on ‘Streetcar Named Desire’ April 6-9 [+VIDEO]

The cast and crew of MTSU Theatre’s final spring 2017 production don’t mind that some audiences may be unfamiliar with the strangeness of kin that permeates the classic “A Streetcar Named Desire” April 6-9 in Tucker Theatre.

“The crazy thing is that college students, they don’t know this play. They didn’t grow up with the movie; it’s famous to their parents but wasn’t to them,” says Murfreesboro sophomore Conner McCabe, who’s taking on the role of Stanley Kowalski, one of American theater’s most iconic and most challenging male characters.

MTSU sophomore Conner McCabe, left, comforts junior Megan Castleberry as senior Hannah Ewing looks on in horror while the three rehearse a scene from the April 6-9 MTSU Theatre production of “A Streetcar Named Desire.” McCabe and Castleberry portray Stanley and Stella Kowalski, respectively, while Ewing portrays Blanche DuBois. Tickets are available now at http://www.MTSUArts.com. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

MTSU sophomore Conner McCabe, left, comforts junior Megan Castleberry as senior Hannah Ewing looks on in horror while the three rehearse a scene from the April 6-9 MTSU Theatre production of “A Streetcar Named Desire.” McCabe and Castleberry portray Stanley and Stella Kowalski, respectively, while Ewing portrays Blanche DuBois. Tickets are available now at www.MTSUArts.com. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

“By limiting ourselves to the standard way of doing ‘Streetcar,’ it’s actually much more freeing to us to tell the story to a generation that hasn’t heard it and maybe needs to hear it. … Stanley was a ‘normal husband’ back then. He’s in a lot of places now. You probably know a Stanley.”

Advance tickets, available at www.mtsuarts.com, are $10 general admission and $5 for K-12 students and senior citizens 55 and older. Curtain times are 7 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, April 6-8, and 2 p.m. Sunday, April 9.

Tickets also will be available at the Tucker Theatre box office 90 minutes before curtain times. You can watch a video preview below, and a full listing of the “Streetcar” cast and crew is available here.

MTSU’s also offering a special lecture, “Catching a 70-Year-Old Streetcar: Why Williams’ Play Still Matters,” at 5 p.m. opening night, April 6, in Tucker Theatre featuring MTSU English professor and Tennessee Williams scholar Robert Bray. The lecture is free and open to the public, and attendees will receive a free ticket voucher good for one performance through the show’s run.

Megan Castleberry, a Cleveland, Tennessee, junior, who’s portraying Stella Kowalski, realized that playwright Williams was making a clear point in creating her character as a shrinking violet alongside her hothouse magnolia sister Blanche DuBois, played by Knoxville senior Hannah Ewing.

Dr. Robert Bray

Dr. Robert Bray

“She’s the person who sees bad things happen and doesn’t do anything about them,” Castleberry said of Stella. “I think Williams was trying to say to not be like her.

“When you see someone who is hurt or see someone who is struggling in a situation, you should not sit aside and wait and make sure it’ll be okay but speak up and take action … especially when you feel like you want to stay quiet.”

Justin Dixon

Justin Dixon

Ewing, who’s tackling the white-gloved, powdered Blanche before she graduates in May, said she’s enjoying the high-speed test created by presenting the classic drama during a first for Tucker Theatre: three major plays in a single semester.

“I think you can kind of get stuck … [and] not allow yourself to push past a way you’ve been doing a certain way of acting,” Ewing said.

“I can push myself in this role to a professional level in an undergraduate setting. This [four-week turnaround] has presented the challenge of putting a show up fast and really diving in deep, not only into the character but into the background of the character.”

Stage manager Justin Dixon, a Lafayette, Tennessee, sophomore who joked that he “only watches the show,” said being a part of a classic is “an extreme privilege.”

“It’s presented so many opportunities for everyone, whether you’re an actor or on the design team or whatever other role,” he said. “There’s so much you can do with it. There’s so much to learn. It’s such a well-known piece of theater that I feel everyone should experience ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’ at least once in their lives.”

For more information about the MTSU Theatre production, visit www.mtsuarts.com.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

 

Will inclement weather affect MTSU’s schedule? Find out here!

If inclement weather forecasts have you wondering if MTSU classes and events will be delayed or canceled, bookmark this page, mtsunews.com/weather, to keep track of the latest updates!

When inclement weather affects university operations, MTSU will always inform the campus and surrounding community via:

  • direct communication with students, faculty and staff through alerts from MTSU’s Critical Notification System;
  • local radio and television stations (see list below);
  • the “Alert Updates” web page at www.mtsu.edu/alertupdates;
  • a note on the MTSU home page at www.mtsu.edu;
  • the university’s Twitter feed, @mtsunewsand
  • the MTSU hotline (615-898-2000).

 

All current  MTSU students, faculty and staff automatically receive email alerts from the university about weather-related emergencies, delays and cancellations.
MTSU students, faculty and staff who also want to receive text and/or voice alerts may add those preferences by clicking here and logging in with a PipelineMT username and password.

(Campus Alert FAQs, including adding or changing contact information, are available here.)

If MTSU classes are canceled or delayed, the announcement applies to all classes, credit and noncredit. All university offices will be open unless the weather announcement specifically says they’ll be closed. Overnight decisions will be announced by 6 a.m. the following day.

Radio Stations
TV Stations
Student class attendance during inclement weather when the university remains open is addressed in MTSU’s 2016-17 “Blue Raider Planner and Handbook.” It explains that

… students will be allowed to use their own discretion when snow and icy conditions exist — they will be given the opportunity to make up missed classes should they decide not to attend. (page 25)

The Ann Campbell Early Learning Center, MTSU’s early intervention preschool, also has updated its inclement-weather closing policy and follows the university’s closure decisions. You can read the policy here and also check the ACE Learning Center’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/AnnCampbellEarlyLearningCenter for more information.

MTSU tests its tornado sirens monthly to ensure proper operation during tornado warnings and other emergency alerts. A schedule of the monthly tests is available at mtsunews.com/tornado-siren-testing. That page also includes a link to recommended tornado shelter locations on campus.

The MTSU Alert4U emergency weather information page at http://mtsu.edu/alert4u/tornado.php also includes tips on preparing for tornado weather and a “Frequently Asked Questions” link to MTSU-specific information for tornado warnings.

MTSU’s WMOT Roots Radio adds video outlet by joining VuHaus network

MTSU’s WMOT Roots Radio 89.5 FM is creating a new connection with its audience by affiliating with VuHaus, a web platform that showcases music videos and livestreams created by public radio stations.

WMOT-new web logoThe partnership was officially launched Tuesday, March 28, with a special live performance of the Americana/folk band The Stray Birds from the Aurora Nashville studios in downtown Nashville, broadcast at www.wmot.org and www.vuhaus.com/nashville.

WMOT, which broadcasts at 89.5 FM as well as online at www.wmot.org, is a charter member of National Public Radio since 1969 and the region’s only Americana music channel. It teamed up last October with the NPR-distributed “World Cafe” music program to create a new Nashville-headquartered content hub, “World Cafe Nashville,” that focuses on expanded coverage of music and artists from Nashville and the South.

VuHaus logo webVuHaus, a Boulder, Colorado-based nonprofit collaboration operated by Public Media Company, curates music videos and livestreamed performances from a network that includes public radio stations in New York City, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Dallas/Fort Worth, Boston, Seattle, St. Louis and more, including West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s “Mountain Stage.”

This new affiliation with VuHaus gives the WMOT/World Cafe Nashville partnership an even larger showcase for Music City’s legacy, which includes classic country music, bluegrass, singer/songwriter, folk, soul, R&B and old-school rock ‘n’ roll, officials said.

“WMOT is thrilled to join VuHaus as an affiliate to present Americana music and artists with partner World Café in Nashville,” said Val Hoeppner, executive director of WMOT Roots Radio.

“At WMOT, we are building a culture of discovery, and this partnership will further our efforts to bring attention to Nashville artists and the sound that is distinctly our Middle Tennessee heritage.”

Val Hoeppner

Val Hoeppner

Roger LaMay

Roger LaMay

WMOT-FM, a 100,000-watt professional radio station housed in the Center for Innovation in Media inside the university’s Bragg Media and Entertainment Building, changed formats last September from its classical, jazz and news-talk focus to Americana in a partnership with Music City Roots, a Nashville-based firm that provides programming for both radio and television.

WMOT airs World Cafe, a daily two-hour music program produced by public radio station WXPN in Philadelphia and syndicated by NPR to more than 200 stations across America, each night at 10 Central. The program was launched in 1991 and features a mix of artist interviews and in-studio performances from almost every musical genre.

“In launching World Cafe Nashville with NPR Music as a southern hub for World Cafe, we were delighted to partner with a great local station in WMOT,” said Roger LaMay, general manager of WXPN and chair of the VuHaus board of directors.

“Extending this commitment to exposing the incredible music of Nashville and the region to a video channel on VuHaus is an important next step. “

For more information about WMOT Roots Radio 89.5 FM, part of MTSU’s College of Media and Entertainment, visit www.wmot.org. For more information about World Cafe, visit http://xpn.org/world-cafe. To learn more about VuHaus, visit http://www.vuhaus.com.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

The WMOT Roots Radio page at VuHaus is shown in this screen grab. Click on the image to visit the site.

The WMOT Roots Radio page at VuHaus is shown in this screen grab. Click on the image to visit the site.

Secured By miniOrange